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ASUS MOBO & Corsair RAM HELP PLEASE !

Discussion in 'Motherboards & Memory' started by Robopimp, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. Robopimp

    Robopimp New Member

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    Hi guys,
    I have an ASUS P8Z77-V PRO mobo with 4x4GB Corsair Vengeance RAM and Core i7 3770k, but Im having an issue with the RAM speeds. That memory is 1866MHz, however, the BIOS reports 1333MHz. I believe that mobo supports 1600MHz ram without overclocking, but my ram is @ 1333. Could it be something wrong with the mobo or ram ?? Maybe I need to overclock ?? If overclock is needed, Is there a way to overclock RAM only and leave CPU with stock clocks ??
    Im a noob at overclocking so please excuse my ignorance.
    Thanks m8s :)
     
  2. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    look through your bios for the memory section, change the setting to either 1600 or 1866, then be sure to set the timings manually along with the voltage.
     
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  3. Robopimp

    Robopimp New Member

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    I have no idea what volts and timings to put XD
    Help :(
     
  4. Aleksander

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    Raise the volts little by little
     
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  5. LGV

    LGV New Member

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    Install CPUz , thets tell you your timings/volts for your ram. Then go to bios to set it.
     
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  6. cadaveca

    cadaveca My name is Dave

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    Unfortunately, you guys aren't being too helpful here. This is far easier than you are making it out to be.



    Give me a half hour to grab some BIOS shots for ya. I have the P8P77-V here, and it'll be the next I'm testing anyway, so I'll toss it on my testbench and show you EXACTLY what to change.. It should only take a few seconds in the BIOS to fix this problem.
     
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  7. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    should be on the sticker on the side of the memory, possibly even on the packaging.
     
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  8. Xzibit

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    Yup, Each individual stick of ram should have a sticker with the settings.

    You can always look up setting at Corsair site aswell with the memory sku#
     
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  9. cadaveca

    cadaveca My name is Dave

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    This is the opening page of the BIOS. Here, go to the top right, and hit the "exit/advanced mode" button, and choose "advanced mode"

    [​IMG]



    Then, hit the right arrow once to get to the AI Tweaker section, shown here:

    [​IMG]

    As you can see the first option has a setting labelled "XMP". Choose that, save and exit, and you are done.


    Now, if you want to get a bit more advanced, you can go to this page here:

    [​IMG]

    And select the "ASUS SPD Information" option, which will show you a page like this:

    [​IMG]


    This page has all the settings for your ram from within the SPD profiles you need. IF you have issues with figuring out the labels, or the XMP setting doesn't work, let me know, and I'll get you sorted. ;) Oh, and I apologize, it took 16 minutes, not a half hour. .:roll:
     

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  10. Robopimp

    Robopimp New Member

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    Thank u all guys for the quick ans, they were really useful.
    Cadaveca thanks a million, that tutorial is awesome :D
     
  11. Widjaja

    Widjaja

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    I think a lot of people are caught out by this misinformation when buying RAM which is actually advertising the XMP overclocked profile speed and not the RAMs native speed.

    The RAM is advertised as 1600 or 1866 in the OPs case only to find the RAM is running at 1333.
    Looking at the RAM specs in CPU-Z also note this RAM IS actually 1333 and can be overclocked stable to the advertised clock speed by enabling XMP in BIOS only on Intel motherboards, otherwise need to be overclocked manually on AMD chipsets.
     
  12. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    BD and llano run 1866 natively. No oc is needed there unless its a mobo limitation, but that won't be the case for AM3+ or FM1 boards.
     
  13. cadaveca

    cadaveca My name is Dave

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    Yeah, this is exactly how it works. OEMs like Corsair and G.SKill buy memory parts that are 1333 or 1600 MHz parts, and then test them for higher speeds, and create an XMP profile for those "pre-tested" speeds. I don't even think there are actual 1866 MHz-native ICs yet, but I could be wrong...like the Samsung sticks I reviewed earlier this year..those were 1600 MHz sticks, native, but they can reach 2400 MHz in some instances. So we might find these same Samsung-made ICs, rated by Samsung for 1600 MHz, in DIMMs from memory makers like Corsair and G.SKill that are 1600 MHz, 1866 MHz, 2133 MHz, and 2400 MHz. Heck, they might even be used in 2600 MHz sticks, for all I know.


    Anyway, to add a bit more info here relevant to the OP, in the "ASUS SPD Information" listings, the secondary timing labels are different from what's listed in the ASUS BIOS's memory timing section. Here's a list to decipher that:

    ASUS SPD = ASUS BIOS listing

    tWR = DRAM WRITE Recovery Time
    tRRD = DRAM RAS# to RAS# Delay
    tRFC = DRAM REF Cycle Time
    tWTR = DRAM WRITE to READ Delay
    tRTP = DRAM READ to PRE Time
    tFAW = DRAM FOUR ACT WIN Time
    tWCL = DRAM WRITE CAS Latency
     
  14. Aleksander

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    If it was being truly helpful i would have an entire list for cad:
    1) If the pc can open, than don't overclock at all.
    I have my rams from 800 to 1600, nothing changed to the pc speed.
    The cpu speed from 3.7Ghz to 2.0Ghz only felt a very slight change when windows opens.
    It opens like 2 seconds later.
    2) I would not even try to comment. Overclocking for me was just to show off to others, nothing else.
    3) The more you overclock, the less life you let the rams live.
    4) The more the bill will come
    5) The more time you will waste
    6) The speeds are very annoying when it comes to ram
    7) The higher the chance to blow up your pc is
    Try making the ram and cpu overclock each other, so when u raise cpu, u raise the ram too.
    And i bet all who overclock don't see any change at all.
     

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