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Back Track 5 good to learn linux on?

Discussion in 'Linux / BSD / Mac OS X' started by [H]@RD5TUFF, Aug 29, 2011.

  1. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    Pretty simple I went to DEF CON 19, learned a lot, and heard a lot about Back Track Linux, and am wanting to learn linux and to learn some about pen testing. I know that Back Track 5 is based on ubuntu, and I currently use ubuntu for browsing and IRC and such.

    Any opinions or tips, and or links you could point me to would be helpful as my googlefu is weak, thanks in advance.
  2. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    iv used i even included it in my dvd for a release. but backtrack 5 isnt an OS its a live from disk program you can use to test networks go to websites hack if your skilled enough etc. it isnt something you can keep your family photos or install open office on.
    Easy Rhino says thanks.
  3. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    I have it currently installed via USB live disk, and it works fine, but what I wnat to know is it goor for learning Linux, and some about pentesting (kismet ect)?
  4. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    if kismet airplay etc are what you want to use it for its good for that, but its not very noob friendly, especially when you start getting into the terminal stuff, which is were most anything is done on backtrack
  5. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    would you suggest another distro ?
  6. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    most programs like kismet etc can be installed on most debian based distros with ease. if you want the ability to probe networks etc with kismet and similar programs but also want to learn linux you can do so with ubuntu.
  7. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    Guess I am good then.
  8. majestic12

    majestic12

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    I think Backtrack is good for learning how to break into a WEP encrypted network... err checking to see how secure it is! I'm a bit partial to Ubuntu -it's got a lot of community support.
    danidant, Easy Rhino and [H]@RD5TUFF say thanks.
  9. Widjaja

    Widjaja

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    Once you learn how to use Backtrack it is useful for breaking into WEP easy.
    The other like WPA and above are well....still pretty hack safe with backtrack.
    You still need to install add-ons (won't go any further) and it is better to get an good external WiFi which is compatible with BT.

    Had a field day after studies, killing time around town looking for WiFi to get into.
    [H]@RD5TUFF says thanks.
  10. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    I saw a demo at DEF CON where a guy used SILICA to break WEP and WPA with 4 mouse clicks, though it cost about 2k for the software.:roll:
  11. majestic12

    majestic12

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    [​IMG]

    Haven't used it in a few years now (last version was Backtrack 2!) -oh the satisfaction of acquiring a network key!
    [H]@RD5TUFF says thanks.
  12. [H]@RD5TUFF

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  13. majestic12

    majestic12

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    Yessum -Haven't used one of those in years as well. :D
  14. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    LOL I still use on for my garage pc because they are more scratch resistant.
  15. IlluminAce

    IlluminAce New Member

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    Great piece of kit - but like most of the above posters I'd typically advise using Backtrack for its intended purpose, i.e. boot to it when you need it.

    As you know, Linux distros are tailored for particular users and use cases (especially so when you get further out from the Linux trunk into the distant branches such as Backtrack, Mint etc). Backtrack is good because it's tailored for security use cases. Similarly, other distros are better tailored for general usage use cases, and it's normally better to use the right tool for the job - don't get out the flat screwdriver to screw in a crosshead. As to which general purpose distro you want, that depends on you. If you're really new to Linux, then the typical names that are recommended are Ubuntu, Mint, PCLinuxOS (urgh)... typically Debian-based distros because of apt, but plenty of others are simple enough too - CentOS, Mandriva, ... ultimately, if you're comfortable at the terminal, which is where you're going to want to get to anyway, then almost any big-name distro should work for you. I'd advise picking Debian or a Debian-based distro and installing what you need on there.

    That said, Backtrack being an Ubuntu derivative, it's easy to use as a distro, but personally, if I really wanted the tools in Backtrack available in my day-to-day distro, I would choose my distro and install them separately. But hey, it's Linux - it's up to you...
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2011
    qubit and [H]@RD5TUFF say thanks.
  16. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    I think that is the conclusion I am coming to as well I have kind of setled on Ubuntu because I am familiar with it. And it is noob friendly, which is a big plus to me as I haven't a clue how to use command line to do anything other than make directory's and open them.:shadedshu
  17. majestic12

    majestic12

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    When in Linux, you will always end up using the terminal (command line) at some point. Doesn't matter what flavor you use -it will happen. Ubuntu has the Synaptic package manager that makes updating/acquiring stuff easier but remembering things like "sudo apt-blah blah blah" will become second nature if you use it enough.
  18. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    Yeah that is what I am trying to learn, but not having much success my googlefu is weak.
  19. majestic12

    majestic12

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    If it's any consolation, it's gotten a lot easier -unless you're a power user, you won't have to use it... much.
  20. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    Not a power user but I want to learn to be.
  21. majestic12

    majestic12

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    You'll get the opportunity then -best of all, it's FREE!!!!

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