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Best UPS?

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by 1c3d0g, Jun 8, 2010.

  1. anonemus

    anonemus New Member

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    Yup, this is how I configured mine right now

    [​IMG]
  2. Kona1169 New Member

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    ive always just ran a powerbar and thats it. ive never had any hardware failure is that is what you are worried about. most computer can recover from a surge they 'shutoff' but come back right away. not always but it happens. if you are most worried about about having it shut down on you just get a ups.
  3. westom

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    Yes. All appliances contain serious surge protection. How often are you replacing less well protected dimmer switches and bathroom GFCIs? Even those have good protection.

    Your only concern is the rare anomaly that can overwhelm protection in all appliances. That anomaly occurs typically once even seven years. And that is made completely irrelevant by one 'whole house' protector that costs about $1 per protected appliance.

    Surges too small to harm any appliances will sometimes destroy grossly undersized power strip protectors. Undersizing promotes sales. Effective protection (ie one earthed 'whole house' protector) means nobody knew a surge existed. But if the power strip is destroyed by a surge that cannot even harm any other appliances, then the most naive among us will recommend that power strip protector.

    Any protector that fails during a surge is a scam. Undersized to increase profit margins and to get the naive to recommend it. Only surges that can overwhelm protection inside appliances - including direct lightning strikes - are made irrelevant by earthing a 'whole house' protector. Lightning strikes are typically 20,000 amps. So that the protector is not damaged, a minimally sized 'whole house' protector starts at 50,000 volts.

    Effective solutions come from more responsible companies including Square D, Siemens, Intermatic, Leviton, and General Electric. A Cutler-Hammer solution sells in Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50. Your concern is that rare surge (ie once every seven years) that can overwhelm protection inside every appliance - including the stove, furnace, and clock radios. An earthed protector protects everything. What most needs protection during a surge? Smoke detectors. Ignore miracle plug-in scams. Spend less money on a 'whole house' protector.
  4. anonemus

    anonemus New Member

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    I'm saving up for one :)

    Is that rare surge applicable as well in my locale (Philippines)? Is my surge protector (see pic) considered an earthed protector? Apologies for this noob questions
  5. westom

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    If referring to the power strip, well those scam do not have earthing. Read its numeric specs. It does not list protection from each type of surge.

    Earthing means, for example, a 3 meter earth ground rod. An effective protector connects from each incoming wire, less than 3 meters, to that 3 meter rod. A protector that does not make that short connection does not claim and cannot provide effective protection.

    This applied everywhere in the world. Why does you telco suffer over 100 surges with each thunderstorm - and no damage? They waste no money on that grossly overpriced power strip. Every incoming wire in every cable first connects short to earth ground via one protector. To make protection better, the protector is located up to 50 meters distant from electronics. That separation is also important for protection.

    Protection is always about where energy dissipates. Either energy is harmlessly absorbed in earth before entering the building. Or that energy will hunt for earth destructively via household appliances. And that power strip protector can sometimes make damage easier.

    How to identify ineffective (profit center) protectors. 1) It has no dedicated wire for the short connection to single point earth ground. 2) Manufacturer will not discuss earthing - may even try to confuse safety ground with earth ground. Your power strip is the worst - violates both points.

    To have protection means a protector connects even directly lightning strikes harmlessly to earth - and a protector remains functional. Protectors that fail during a surge provide no protection. Literally disconnect as fast as possible while leaving the surge connected to that appliance.
  6. anonemus

    anonemus New Member

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    So would you advise that I do away with my power strip and just connect the AVR, westom?
  7. westom

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    I first advise answering this question. What are you trying to solve? Significant facts are obvious just by observing incandescent bulbs.

    If protecting unsaved data from a blackout, then a UPS is recommended. If incandescent lamps remains more than 50% intensity, then AVR is already performed inside every electronic power supply. UPS does nothing. If noise is the problem, then a power suply is missing essentiaal funtions or a noise filter - far in excess of what anyone has discussed - is required.

    If power factor is bad, well that is solved inside electronic appliances and must be corrected elsewhere to protect electric motors such as the refrigerator. If lights dim or brighten when a major appliance power cycles, then an electrician may be required to solve a serous human safety threat in household wiring.

    In every case, different problems require different solutions. There is no magic box to solve all as claimed by retail salesmen and hearsay.

    AVR is already performed inside every electronic appliance. AVR is only necessary for motorized appliances when utility power is defective - varies by much greater than 5% - violates international standards.

    That UPS claims many functions that are also near zero. Do virtually nothing. But can be hyped to a majority as it saves the world. When claims are made subjectively - no numbers - than a majority suddenly become experts. That UPS has only one function. To protect unsave data - to a disk drive, or a movie recorded by a video recorder. It does not do fancy miracles claimed by hearsay and sales brochures.

    Remember, they can lie all they want in a sales brochure. But the numeric specs must be honest. Show me the numbers.

    Step one - first define a problem to be solved.
    anonemus says thanks.
  8. anonemus

    anonemus New Member

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    No, I'm not concerned about protecting data as my PC is mainly for gaming. I'm more concerned about protecting my PC main components from damages brought about by electrical instability coming from the house outlets...

    Thanks for the insights and info, westom. A lot to digest...
  9. AsRock

    AsRock TPU addict

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    However some of them pay up when their UPS fails to stop your system being fried. However there should be some thing else before a UPS but you have to be careful as some of them cannot handle a PC. So ya gotta keep away from the cheap power breakers at least.

    Which in turn bad shutdowns can damage\kill a HDD or even data loss.

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