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BIOS voltage does not match RAM voltage - what to do?

Discussion in 'Motherboards & Memory' started by Artas1984, Dec 23, 2011.

  1. Artas1984

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    Written on my RAM modules is 1.65 V. But my default BIOS setting adjusts just 1.5 V.

    Should i set the voltage to 1.65 V, as written on RAM or leave 1.5 V?

    Logicaly thinking i probably should set the voltage to 1.65 V, even though my bios thinks it is an overclock in the risk zone, yes?

    Answer fast please.:respect:!!!
     
  2. Frick

    Frick Fishfaced Nincompoop

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    Lower voltages are always better if it's stable.
     
  3. Crap Daddy

    Crap Daddy

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    Sandy Bridge? If you want answers come with more details - mobo, CPU and RAM.
     
  4. Artas1984

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    Motherboard: Gigabyte 890GX 2.1
    Motherboard: Gigabyte 890GX, version 2.1
    CPU: Phenom II X6 1075T, stepping 0 (no OC)
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2011
  5. Artas1984

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    I just found a RAM manual where it says that in order to keep timings at 7-7-7-20 instead of 9-9-9-24, one has to increase voltage from 1.5 V at 1.65 V

    It is clear now.
     
  6. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    Increasing the voltage will not change the timings. You can increase the voltage, but the timings need set in a separate section of the bios.
     
  7. Artas1984

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    I obvioulsy know that. What i did not know is that you have to increase voltage in order to keep lower timings. I always thought that you have to increase votlage only when overclocking raw MHz, not lowering CL.
     
  8. BlackOmega

    BlackOmega

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    Increasing voltage, increases the signal. Or more specifically the peaks of the Sine wave. This not only applies to RAM but also the CPU and anything else that has a frequency.

    At any rate, you need to increase voltage to your RAM when you want to increase frequency (MHz), tighten timings, or when overclocking your CPU-NB frequency. However, try not to exceed 1.65v as that's what the integrated memory controller (IMC) is rated for. Overvolting the IMC will lead to degradation over time. Also bear in mind that AMD only rates their IMC to handle 1333MHz RAM. ANYTHING over that is considered an overclock. I'm not 100% positive if that applies to the Thuban's, x6 CPU's, and possibly the 960T, I know for a fact that it does apply to Athlon II's and the Deneb core Phenom II's.

    To answer your other question about timings (from the other thread), a good rule of thumb to follow for setting your timings is this:
    CAS# Latency (CL) + RAS# to CAS# Delay (tRCD) + RAS# Precharge (tRP) = Cycle Time (tRAS)

    then (this part only applies to AMD's)

    RAS# Precharge (tRP) + Cycle Time (tRAS) = Bank cycle time (tRC).

    Then simply follow the equation through.

    For instance if you wanted CAS 7 RAM you could try timings such as 7-7-7-21-28, or if that is not fully stable you could try loosening the RAS# to CAS# delay (tRCD) and your timings would then be 7-8-7-22-29. I've found when overclocking my Phenom II x3 720, that equation helped me get my RAM very stable.

    Now overclocking your RAM will net you some performance gains, however, you will net A LOT MORE performance from overclocking the CPU-NB frequency. That is the actual lane between the CPU and the RAM, so obviously the faster it is, the better the performance. And the Thuban's (x6 CPUs') can overclock this frequency like crazy. It's not at all unheard of increasing the CPU-NB on those to well over 3000MHz (2000 is stock).

    Hope that helps. Good luck! :toast:
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2011

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