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Black Holes

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by Drone, Sep 24, 2011.

  1. lyndonguitar

    lyndonguitar I play games

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    Dark matter is not black holes: Black holes are gravity lenses that bend light. Astronomers do not see enough lensing events to account for the amount of dark matter that must exist. That's what i've read, and If I understand your post correctly, Primordial black holes have weaker lensing? so they are just black holes after all?

    I really hope to be alive when we perfect the warp drive tech and use it for propulsion on manned or unmanned space travel like we use rockets today, I wish China and India would hasten up the development of Space Exploration Technologies to kickstart a new Space Race (it can provoke US and Russia to increase their budgets)

    Current estimates says that we can get to this kind of tech in 100 to 1000 years, It could be way earlier though

    On Oct. 9, 1903, the New York Times wrote:
    “The flying machine which will really fly might be evolved by the combined and continuous efforts of mathematicians and mechanics in from one million to ten million years.”
     
  2. Drone

    Drone

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    Black holes bend light's path and create rings and multiple false images of a single object. The article in my OP is just an alternative theory (alternative to the LSP). Neither LSP nor primordial atomic size black holes were ever found, it's just a theory.

    Gravitational lensing proved right many times and you're right gravitational lensing of dark matter alone is not well studied/understood yet.

    I don't know what to say about that warp drive I'm more into wormholes, they're more fascinating. If humankind spent more money on science instead of wasting it on military and surveillance crap this world would've been a better place.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2013
  3. Drone

    Drone

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    New Zinger Space Image of 3C353 From Chandra's X-Ray Archives

    [​IMG]


     
  4. Drone

    Drone

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    [​IMG]

    This image shows a giant jet of particles that has been shot out from the vicinity of supermassive black hole (quasar) called 3C273. The jet is enormous, stretching across more than 100000 ly of space - a size comparable to our own Milky Way galaxy.

    A kaleidoscope of colors represents the jet's assorted light waves. X-rays, detected by Chandra, are the highest-energy light in the image are seen at far left in blue (the black hole itself is well to the left of the image). Moving from left to right, the light diminishes in energy, and wavelengths increase in size.
     
  5. Drone

    Drone

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    Another black hole discovered!

    A team of researchers discovered the first examples of black holes in globular star clusters in our own galaxy, upsetting 40 years of theories against their possible existence.

    Fascinating!


    [​IMG]


    Radio image (left) and x-ray image (right). The yellow circle shows the black hole found in the M62 star cluster (which is 23000 ly away from Earth) in our Galaxy. The red circle denotes a neutron star close by.
     
  6. Drone

    Drone

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    Amazing discovery:

    Heavy atoms help give black hole jets their power

    Here's a diagram

    [​IMG]

    And more:

     
  7. Drone

    Drone

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    Researchers have ruled out a range of primordial black holes as dark matter, but have not ruled them out completely.

     
  8. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    I think most scientists ruled out Black Holes long ago. If we had so much matter in black holes than is needed to account for Dark Matter, we'd be able to see the gravitational effects through lensing, or the radiation if stuff is falling in (which has to happen at some point, somewhere, with so many BHs around it should be a uniform radiation).

    Anyone know if there are any solid theories for what happens if DM falls into BHs ? It should be able to, right? Because it interacts with gravity.
     
  9. Drone

    Drone

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    Same what happens to normal matter. BH doesn't give a damn if it's normal or dark matter. Once it crossed the event horizon it's gone.
     
  10. Drone

    Drone

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    Amazing news!

    [​IMG]
     
  11. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    You know, uranium and most other extremely dense metals naturally give off x-rays (Henri Becquerel discovered this). Sagittarius A* is undeniably very dense. It stands to reason that it would have x-ray emissions regardless if it is or isn't a black hole.

    Black holes still don't explain how spiral galaxies can work. Dark matter has to be involved in that phenomena.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2013
    Crunching for Team TPU
  12. Drone

    Drone

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    lmao you really think that there are gazillions of tons of uranium there? Sgr A* emits every kind of radiation including radio waves, it's definitely a supermassive black hole.
     
  13. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    No, I did the math and uranium isn't dense enough. I don't remember the number I came up with but it really isn't that much denser than uranium. I think it was closer to an atomic weight of 300'ish.
     
    Crunching for Team TPU
  14. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    How to kill a black hole, err, sorta, not quite, hypoothetically.
    Read the rest at New Scientist
     
  15. Drone

    Drone

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    [​IMG]


    Whatever that selfish stuff is, it looks so cool.
     
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  16. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    I can't get over the scale that these things happen over. It really is mind boggling.
     
  17. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    Jets are not from inside the event horizon of the black hole. They are from matter falling into the black hole, so they do not reduce its energy/matter.
     
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  18. Drone

    Drone

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    Astronomers see huge clouds of gas orbiting supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. Once thought to be a relatively uniform, fog-like ring, the accreting matter instead forms clumps dense enough to intermittently dim the intense radiation blazing forth as these enormous objects condense and consume matter.

    Conceptual computer animation.



    Looks pretty cool
     
  19. Drone

    Drone

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    New black hole!

    Team of Australian and American astronomers have been studying nearby galaxy M83 and have found a new superpowered small black hole, named MQ1

    [​IMG]

    MQ1 is a stellar mass black hole and was likely formed when a star died, collapsing to leave behind a compact mass. It's classed as a microquasar - a black hole surrounded by a bubble of hot gas, which is heated by two jets just outside the black hole, powerfully shooting out energy in opposite directions, acting like cosmic sandblasters pushing out on the surrounding gas.

    That's really cool. It ain't big but so powerful! As a comparison, the most powerful microquasar in our galaxy, known as SS433, is about 10 times less powerful than MQ1!

    Although the black hole in MQ1 is only about 100 km wide, the MQ1 structure - as identified by the Hubble Space Telescope - is much bigger than our Solar System, as the jets around it extend ~ 20 ly from either side of the black hole.
     
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  20. Drone

    Drone

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    The spin rate of a supermassive black hole has been measured for the first time

    [​IMG]


    X-ray observations of quasar RX J1131-1231 (located six billion ly away from Earth) show it's whizzing around at almost half the speed of light!!!




    “We estimate that the X-rays are coming from a region in the disk located only about three times the radius of the event horizon - the point of no return for infalling matter,” stated Jon Miller, an associate professor of astronomy at the University of Michigan and a co-author on the paper. “The black hole must be spinning extremely rapidly to allow a disk to survive at such a small radius.”
     
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  21. scoutingwraith

    scoutingwraith

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    I was about to post that article. It is amazing how fast it is spinning.
     
  22. arskatb

    arskatb

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  23. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Finally, some physics make sense when looking at the black hole problem. The classic definition of them...it doesn't pass the logical test. "Apparent horizon" does.

    I still contest that black holes cannot form from dying stars. I suspect they formed not long after the "big bang" itself. Without black holes, how do the gases coalesce to form stars and stars eventually aid the formation of planets? The gases would likely spread out to become as distant as galaxies are today. As such, I believe black holes aren't "star stuff," they're "big bang" stuff. Physicists can theorize all they want about black holes but I think, when we actually get the chance to poke and prod one, we'll have to throw out virtually everything we know about them. I think they're altogether alien and no experiments performed on Earth are going to explain their nature.

    We have a pretty good grasp of atoms and radiation yet, quantum mechanics baffle and confuse. What if black holes are the opposite of quantum mechanics--what if they are made of the stuff that exceeds mass and radiation? What if they are the product of everything in the universe compressed into a small space? Would it be mass, radiation, or governed by quantum mechanics or would it be something entirely different? What we need to find out is what happens when two galactic cores (black holes) merge--or do they? Maybe they're solid bodies and they form a non-spherical object. That may also explain why galaxies can take on different shapes than your typical "spiral" galaxy.

    In a lot of ways, I don't think theoretical physicists are asking the right questions about black holes.


    Still, I think Hawking is on to something here. Black holes could be the furnace heavy metals are forged in.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2014
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  24. Drone

    Drone

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    This is old news but fascinating nevertheless

    [​IMG]

    The result is of great importance. It provides compelling evidence of the close ties between black hole, host galaxy, and their surroundings. Like symbiotic species a galaxy and its central black hole lead intimately connected lives, the galaxy providing matter to feed the black hole, and the black hole returning energy to the galaxy.

    The image was made during the test-phase of LOFAR, and targeted the giant elliptical galaxy M87, at the center of a galaxy cluster in the constellation of Virgo. This galaxy is 2000 times more massive than Milky Way and hosts in its center one of the most massive black holes discovered so far, with a mass 6 billion times that of our Sun. Every few minutes this black hole swallows an amount of matter similar to that of the whole Earth, converting part of it into radiation and a larger part into powerful jets of ultra-fast particles, which are responsible for the observed radio emission.


     
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  25. kwangso123 New Member

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    What if...there's a paradise on blackhole...where physics law doesn't need to apply :p
     

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