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burning in

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by Solaris17, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    ok so im under the impression that if you oc...say like 300 mhz and then it wont boot if u clock it @ like 250 and its stable u let it run like that for a while then eventually it "burns in" and u can then go to the 300mhz point and abouve do i have this right?.......anyways i ocd my processor a little more now @
    2250mhz cpu
    180mhz fsb
    360mhz total bus speed
    and 216mhz mem....

    the problem is prime 95 got errors my computer runs everything i whant it to and my temps r nice but errors agitate me if i just let it run at the above speeds will i eventually get no errors and if so how long should i leave it like this?

    is their a "burn in" program that will speed it up?


    thnx guys :)
  2. Thermopylae_480

    Thermopylae_480 New Member

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    Thats and interesting idea. I've never heard of it before, I too would like some confirmation of it.
  3. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    /bump.....anyone?
  4. djbbenn New Member

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    From what I have believe, is that the "burn in " process, is the whole process of overclocking. As you overclock, you run a stability test by stressing the cpu really hard, if it passes, you go with a higher frequency. Then you do another strees or "burn in" test. I don't really believe that you have to run a electrical component for a while before overclocking. I may be totally wrong, but thats my point of view on this matter. I am interested to what others have to say on this as well.

    -Dan
  5. Ramine New Member

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    hehe, u are totally write, burnin testing does not mean burning it to that point of OC then you can get some more out of it, it is a type of trsting, like deferred burn in or immediate burn in.
  6. Zurb New Member

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    yes you can burn in components (at least) Ram and Cpu.when you burn in you should have as high voltage as you dare (without destroying anything) and put it in a stresstest loop. And let it run for several hours, the more the better 24 - 72 H I would recommend.
  7. Star New Member

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    i haven't seen any better results with "burning in" a chip first. my old 2500 XP just did not want to do 400FSB and i inched it up 1Mhz at a time for like a week lol. as for the prime95 errors - try increasing your Vcore voltage. (and definitely make sure ur ram passes test 5 and 6 of memtest86+ just to rule out ram as the culprit)

    EDIT: btw i just noticed u have a barton. u should get a mobile, they are nice i got one in my other box running prime stable at 2.5Ghz 200x12.5
  8. Poisonsnak New Member

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    The only place I have seen evidence of burn-in is on BH-5 memory (search dfi-street.com), other electrical components if anything will perform worse after being over volted and run hot for extended periods. The reason you stress components is to make sure they're stable, that's all.
  9. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

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    Actually it is true for new CPU's that they can perform a bit better after being used for a while. Though I'm not sure if the difference is that big.
  10. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    thnx guys :)
  11. shadowing New Member

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    Burn-in pretty much works for most RAM. For CPUs, I don't really think it works.

    This is all from my experience.
  12. Zurb New Member

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    FACT: in some electrical components the resistance drops after burned in... reacts/behaves the same way as rising the voltages

    Correct me if I´m wrong. But I think this is True

    And yes I also think that on SOME components it´ll work and on some as quoted above ( If you set to high voltage )

    And I´m not anykind of a electrician... I´m a plumber :D And have had computers as a hobby for as long back I can remember
  13. Poisonsnak New Member

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    Well, for conductors the resistance goes up with temperature, but for semiconductors it does go down so maybe you're right. Once the temperature returns to normal though the effects should disappear I think.

    Reference:
    http://mot.vuse.vanderbilt.edu/mse150/lab_3.htm

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