1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

C++ texts

Discussion in 'Programming & Webmastering' started by kane22, Jul 16, 2009.

  1. kane22

    kane22 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009
    Messages:
    57 (0.03/day)
    Thanks Received:
    7
    Location:
    emory,va
    Hi all. Looking for a bit of advice that I hope any of you experienced programmers may help me with. I am currently trying to learn C++, however, I have had 0 experience in the past with programming languages. I had asked around the bookstore I currently work at for references to a decent C++ "how-to"/learning guide, but the only suggestion that I received was C++ for dummies...needless to say it has helped very little (although I have learned some minor aspects). I just wanted to know how any of you all learned C++, and whether you could maybe suggest a decent guide to learn from. Thank you all!
     
  2. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,553 (2.70/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,383
    I learned some basics at school many years ago, nothing really useful. I don't like C++, I learned VB via VBA until I figured .NET is far more easy. From there I started making little tools Googling the things I required. Basically having a specific goal works best for me, learning random crap I'm not using in any useful way doesn't get me anywhere.

    I'm really crap as a programmer btw :)
     
    kane22 says thanks.
  3. kane22

    kane22 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009
    Messages:
    57 (0.03/day)
    Thanks Received:
    7
    Location:
    emory,va
    ha-ha I am sure you are better than me :p. Thanks for the advice anyway! :)

    I am mainly interested in learning because of the "possible" job prospects it may open up..I am not studying computer science in college (biology/literature major here), but I do wish to acquire some type of computer certification to make me more marketable. I was A+ certified way back when, but honestly I was young and never used it, or knew what to do with it anyway ha-ha
     
  4. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,553 (2.70/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,383
    Take some basic courses then, if you're applying for a job it helps if you're able to back up whatever you say with pieces of paper. Sure you know a bit of C++, they won't be able to tell what you can and can't do without seeing some certificate or references. Simple as those certificates might be, they do help. For instance I actually had some years working at TPU on my CV, my current boss actually liked it as my job included working with hardware. I could have told him I knew something about hardware and he would know nothing, though he actually heard of atitool at the time and our software relies heavily on videocards, so my work here at TPU actually looked interesting to my boss.
    Just list as much as you can, if the one taking the interview finds something interesting he'll ask.

    Personally I use VB for simple tools and automation, it's just a little thing that makes my job easier. I'd never apply for a job as programmer as I simply don't know enough for that.
     
  5. kane22

    kane22 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009
    Messages:
    57 (0.03/day)
    Thanks Received:
    7
    Location:
    emory,va
    I will have to look at what my college offers, but that sounds like a good idea. There are just so many computer related careers anymore that I, and probably along with many others, have no idea what employers are looking for anymore. Personally, I would like to work with the mechanical aspects of computers, and figured familiarizing myself with some programming language may assist me sometime or another.
     
  6. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,553 (2.70/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,383
    They mostly look for some 18yo with 25 years of experience for minimum wage.

    And that's not completely a joke. Either way, it doesn't really matter if you're good at anything when applying for a job, you just need the papers. It will matte if you plan on keeping the job once you get it.
     
  7. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    13,881 (4.77/day)
    Thanks Received:
    5,620
    Location:
    Cheeseland (Wisconsin, USA)
    Why not just use the internet for resources?
    There is more information on C++ programming on the internet than you could read in your lifetime. From absolute beginner to highly advanced stuff including tutorials, references, best practices, tip, tricks, etc.
    You can use the stickied post at the top of this forum as a good launching point.
     
  8. Jizzler

    Jizzler

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Messages:
    3,486 (1.28/day)
    Thanks Received:
    655
    Location:
    Geneva, FL, USA
    Good deal.

    Part of my job is to screen applicants before getting an interview with the director. I see so many kids coming out of school who know the basics, but little else. Anyone showing the slightest bit of initiative will get my approval.
     
  9. YinYang.ERROR

    YinYang.ERROR New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2009
    Messages:
    463 (0.22/day)
    Thanks Received:
    33
    Master says thanks.
  10. adbroke New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2009
    Messages:
    3 (0.00/day)
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Hi kane22 ,
    i know its not easy to become good programmer in C++
    i suggest you to set your mind that actually you want to learn C++.
    Once you start it seems boring in beginning but its very interesting.
    Basic logic you can develop from this language..
    for more help on C++ find material on net ..
     
  11. zenonzyta01 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4 (0.00/day)
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Hi,
    I have whole guides of the C++.What you want?
    Can you give me some particular program name for C++.
    Thanks for sharing this information.
     
  12. shashank86 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2009
    Messages:
    1 (0.00/day)
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Herbert schildt's The complete reference C++... Don't go by the size of the book... It is really awesome... Good for both beginners and pros...
    Cheers..
     
  13. 3870x2

    3870x2

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    Messages:
    4,875 (1.93/day)
    Thanks Received:
    690
    Location:
    Joplin, Mo
    I agree with Dan, you have to set short goals that interest you, and complete them one after another. From hello world! to a dice game, to graphical user interface coloring programs, to a full fledged program, you have to learn eventually.

    The trick is to do something that is going to keep your interest. Same with playing the guitar, you cant start out playing "Master of Puppets" or "Pinball Wizard", but if you conquer "Mary had a little lamb", you will be ecstatic.
     
  14. CrackerJack

    CrackerJack

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    2,719 (1.04/day)
    Thanks Received:
    452
    Location:
    East TN
    Agree

    Be kinda silly to make a full program, and not know had to do a little program. Even the Hello World and the other thousands like it will help you in the long run, boring I know. But they all teach you something
     
  15. 3870x2

    3870x2

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    Messages:
    4,875 (1.93/day)
    Thanks Received:
    690
    Location:
    Joplin, Mo
    I had a series of games that I made called "Bad Farming", it was like the old school drug wars, but with farm animals. The series included bad farming 1, 2, 3, and the expansion to 3.

    1 was a very simple program where you could buy and sell, and get money. There were random prices (IE from 1-5 for pig, 20-30 for cow, etc...). The system required you to put numbers for things you wanted to sell.

    2 was more in-depth, having supply and demand random "Blowouts" that increased the price thrice-fold. Here, you had to pay Giovanni by the end of 15, 30, and 60 days, in different amounts starting with 3000 to pay off a loan. This installment included cheat codes, including turning the farm lingo into drug lingo by entering your name as "Giovanni" on the "Enter name" screen. This system let you type things like "Sell Chicken/Buy Chicken/Skip Day", etc... but suffered from problems like capital letters, and small mistakes, where you would waste a day by entering the incorrect syntax.

    3 was much like 2, with graphics (very poorly pixel drawn designs, etc...), an ability to "save your game" and play beyond 60 days, and several other game tweaks. The expansion added more animals, and an options and credit menu, where you could set several different options from the color of text, to graphics on/off, etc... This system was very user friendly, where you could misspell several different ways, and still have the game understand you, like "Sell Chicken" or "sell chicken" or "sel chiken", etc...
     
  16. james2008 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    Messages:
    29 (0.01/day)
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Unless someone is there teaching you, it is a hard subject.
    It would be akin to trying to learn how to speak a different language.
    The best anyone can probably do is to point you in the right direction.

    So you would say "how do I use the random function" and I would say:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <time.h>

    srand ( time(NULL) );
    randomguess = rand() % 50 + 1;

    and explain that the srand would be the seeded part, by the function of
    time. Then the interger (varaible) randomguess would ouput a number from
    1 to 50, using the modulus.

    but you don't need to understand that as a beginner, that will come in time
    all you need to know is that it works. Then slowly build up that way, it will
    be some 2 years, from novice, to be able to program.

    And though really geeky, great fun, and all the girls will love you
    I wish
    James
     
  17. Master

    Master

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Messages:
    80 (0.03/day)
    Thanks Received:
    9
    Location:
    Iran
    if you can afford it , go get a Deitel and Deitels C++ how to program, its indeed a great book
    you can also garb it form your city / college library .
    and put the books aside, you can find pretty much everything you need on the iternet! lots of tutorials are out there! you can either register at codeguru or cprogrammingboard and alot more!
    C++ is a good language , but this language needs alot of effort !
     
  18. entropy13

    entropy13

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2009
    Messages:
    4,985 (2.31/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,225
    I was taught C++ during high school. Suffice to say I barely remember anything about it now (same with Visual Basic). At least I remember something about Java...
     
  19. mab1376

    mab1376

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Messages:
    951 (0.31/day)
    Thanks Received:
    46
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Out of all the C variants, I'm seeing C# being used more and more, from experience you can't know too much when interviewing for a programming job, and a lot of entry level jobs offer OJT for a lot of proprietary resume builders. For instance at my previous job I picked up some Intel PRO-IV programming and Fujitsu Superlayer, which are both very obscure and highly proprietary, and right now in school I'm learning IBM Assembly languagage as well as VB.net and Java.

    Did I mention I'm not even a programmer... :laugh:

    Point being learn whatever you can, it'll only help you as time goes on.
     

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page