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Core i7 965 XE Unboxed, Stock Cooler and Processor Exposed

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Sep 23, 2008.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Intel would be rolling out an elite fleet of desktop processors based on the new Nehalem architecture soon. The first derivative, the Bloomfield core, is supposed to be the architecture's flagship for the desktop PC market. And for it, Core i7 Extreme 965 is supposed to be the leading processor. Priced at US $999, the processor is clocked at 3.20 GHz and features four cores and eight logical processors thanks to HyperThreading Technology (encore). Details of it are covered here.

    Mobile01, unboxed the i7 965 before launch. The contents show a massive stock cooler and the processor itself. The stock cooler is composed of the same fins projecting radially, just that they are much thinner, and more in number (to boost surface area of dissipation). The cooler uses 50% of fins made of copper and the rest 50% made of aluminum. The large CPU contact base is made of copper and pre-applied TIM. The box pictured is the "white-box" part, expect the retail box to be of that exact size.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Source: Mobile01
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2008
    Mussels, OnBoard, freakshow and 2 others say thanks.
  2. Cruvenium New Member

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    How did they get their hands on it D:!
  3. lemonadesoda

    lemonadesoda

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    That is fake for sure. Why? That is the worse design of fan ever. There is a lot of airflow resistance as air is forced into the fins. Unless there is a baffle around the fan blades, 90% of the air will spill. That means the cooling efficiency will be absolutely terrible. Most air will spill and the fans will be spinning like crazy. Turbulence in the case, but very ineffective cooling of the CPU. There is no way a company like Intel would make such a big mistake.

    P.S. Take a look at just about any Zalman CPU cooler that uses the "spilt airflow" as part of the cooling... why their fins extend around the fan.
  4. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh, so being the worst design makes it fake automatically? Seen the Intel stickers on the fan and the box?
  5. lemonadesoda

    lemonadesoda

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    OK, OK, it's possible that Intel have made the worse fan possible. Let's put it another way: the person that designed this for Intel has a FAKE engineering degree. PS. Brown box doesnt look legit.
  6. InnocentCriminal

    InnocentCriminal Resident Grammar Amender

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    Could just be a proto-type cooler.
  7. Katanai

    Katanai

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    Ooh finally. That chip looks tasty! I just need to sell an organ or two now to afford a brand new system. :laugh:
  8. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Apparently Intel outsources thermodynamics research, kuhler design, and manufacturing to Sanyo-Denki of Japan (spell?) and others. They worked on the s478, initial models of the s775 coolers. Don't know about the Xeon fans though.
  9. InnocentCriminal

    InnocentCriminal Resident Grammar Amender

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    They also use those stupid push-pin(s) connectors again. >.<
  10. Animalpak

    Animalpak

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    the thermal paste is already applied ?
  11. InnocentCriminal

    InnocentCriminal Resident Grammar Amender

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    Yep! It's not great thermal-paste to be honest. Current retail Intel CPUs (well, HSFs) do.
  12. Error 404

    Error 404 New Member

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    Chip looks crazy, so many pins!
    BUT THEY HAVE PUSHPINS!! :mad::shadedshu
    I vote this is the worst fan design ever; the only way it could be worse is if they used all aluminium fins...
  13. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Pushpin because motherboards have retention back-plates for the CPU socket.
  14. Error 404

    Error 404 New Member

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    Are they any easier to use compared to the LGA 775 ones? I hate those things, feels like I'm trying to push the whole darn pin assembly through the mobo...
    Does the larger cooler mean higher TDPs?
  15. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, Bloomfield chips have 130W ratings. The back-plates hold the CPU socket assembly, if you add another back-plate to the cooler, that would mess with the board-chassis clearance.
  16. laszlo

    laszlo

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    i don't think the fan design is wrong is even curved to concentrate the airflow to the pins;considering the thermal output of the cpu and the copper-aluminium cooler i think is enough

    keep in mind that 90% of buyers use the box cooler anyway which support a small oc also and the rest will buy aftermarket cooler anyway

    compared with older intel box cooler is a improvement for sure
  17. tigger

    tigger I'm the only one

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    I love the way the stepping says q1ck :laugh: you reckon it is quick.
  18. lemonadesoda

    lemonadesoda

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    Not just Q1CK, but Q1CKES (t).
  19. thraxed Guest

    A 2.93 GHz Core i7 940 system has been used to run a 3DMark Vantage benchmark and gave a CPU score of 17,966.[12] The 2.66 GHz Core i7 920 scores 16,294. A 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo E6600 scores 4,300.[13]

    AnandTech tested the Intel QuickPath Interconnect (4.8 GT/s version) and found the copy bandwidth using triple-channel 1066 MHz DDR3 was 12.0 GB/s. A 3.0 GHz Core 2 Quad system using dual-channel 1066 MHz DDR3 achieved 6.9 GB/s.[14]
  20. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    The "baffles" (it's actually called a shroud, just a fyi) aren't that important. Take a look at the fan designs on the Freezer7 or 64 Pros. They are unshrouded, but perform well. I actually built a shroud for my F64 Pro, because I thought the same way you did. You know how much of a temp difference it made? Absolutely nothing.
  21. ShadowFold

    ShadowFold New Member

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    My life goal is to punch the person who made push pins in the face. Intel seriously needs a better design..
    Error 404, mdm-adph and 3xploit say thanks.
  22. PCpraiser100 New Member

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    Well Intel needs push pins so that even the newest builders can install their fans. Besides, the first of their kind these fans were supposed to be cleaned yearly because of their fins so I guess that's one of the major reasons why there is push pins...On the other hand, your right. They do need a better design, in cooling though not installation or else they might need to make a commitment with motherboard companies to replaces their push pin slots.
  23. PVTCaboose1337

    PVTCaboose1337 Graphical Hacker

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    The push pins are pretty fail. I usually hate them, but sometimes I feel installation is easier... just not by much.
  24. tigger

    tigger I'm the only one

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    At least there is 4 good spaced holes to mount better coolers on.I dont mind the push pin fitting,at least its relativley easy to remove/replace without taking the board out.I do agree though that its time for a new design.
  25. techie81

    techie81 New Member

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    When are they going to move away from they cumbersome pushpin?

    Other than that, looks yummy.

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