1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

Corsair Announces DDR3 Memory Upgrades for Apple Computers

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Aug 23, 2011.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    Messages:
    28,972 (10.99/day)
    Thanks Received:
    13,759
    Location:
    Hyderabad, India
    Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC gaming hardware market, today announced worldwide retail availability of 4GB DDR3 memory for Apple Mac desktop and laptop PCs.

    Corsair’s Mac memory kits are tested at Apple Developer Compatibility Labs and are guaranteed to work with any Mac desktop or notebook PC that supports 4GB DDR3 SODIMMs, including iMac, Mac mini, Mac Pro, MacBook, and MacBook Pro models. This includes virtually all models offered by Apple since 2010.

    [​IMG]

    The new DDR3 Mac memory upgrades, like all Corsair DRAM products, are tested to exacting standards and come with a limited lifetime warranty.

    An article detailing the installation of Corsair Mac memory in a MacBook Pro can be found on the Corsair Blog, here.

    "Macs are often the platform of choice for video production, photo editing and graphics design, and these applications require lots of memory." said Giovanni Sena, Director of Memory Products at Corsair. "With hassle-free compatibility and renowned Corsair compatibility and support, our new Mac memory upgrades are a smart performance investment.

    Corsair Mac memory upgrade kits are available in the following configurations:

    [​IMG]

    The new DDR3 Mac memory kits are available immediately from Corsair’s worldwide network of resellers and distributors.
     
  2. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    Messages:
    28,972 (10.99/day)
    Thanks Received:
    13,759
    Location:
    Hyderabad, India
    Apple-bashing in this thread invites infractions.
     
  3. Thrackan

    Thrackan

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2008
    Messages:
    3,482 (1.53/day)
    Thanks Received:
    656
    How are these memory modules price-wise?
     
  4. arterius2

    Joined:
    May 21, 2011
    Messages:
    524 (0.40/day)
    Thanks Received:
    105
    so whats wrong with my "non-mac certified" ram that I installed into my macbook pro the other day? (which works perfectly)
     
  5. repman244

    repman244

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,119 (0.82/day)
    Thanks Received:
    459
    It's not certified :p

    Well you could end up with issues with "non-certified" types of RAM. A good example for this are servers, where you must use the so called "certified" RAM which was tested for 100% stability.
    Same goes for HDD's with special firmware (HP firmware for example).
     
  6. arterius2

    Joined:
    May 21, 2011
    Messages:
    524 (0.40/day)
    Thanks Received:
    105
    so in another word - just pure gimmicks

    oh right, so I need to swap out all my ram on my intel rig because they are not "intel-certified", oh and i probably need to switch out my ram on my AMD workstation as well, and replace them with "amd-certified" ram, because god forbid! amd tells me i do not have 100% stability.
     
  7. repman244

    repman244

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,119 (0.82/day)
    Thanks Received:
    459
    That's why I mentioned servers and 100% stability, you don't mess with hardware parts there, even in workstations if it's mission critical. For normal desktop it doesn't matter.

    AFAIK Mac's and such can be quite picky with hardware, but I could be wrong here ;)
     
  8. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2009
    Messages:
    9,212 (4.97/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,995
    Location:
    Home
    Server rams have ECC, and that is expensive. Nothing to do with certification or stability. Well, that is the main difference anyway.

    I was under impression that Apple uses Intel controllers and you can just "plug and play", no?
     
  9. repman244

    repman244

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,119 (0.82/day)
    Thanks Received:
    459
    :wtf: ECC is for stability reasons.
    And certified RAM is guaranteed to work with a specific server/workstation. And like I said if you have a server you do not mess with weird hardware. The certified RAM is thoroughly tested for that specific machine.
    That's why you get BSOD's (not often but it does happen) in normal PC's, because you mix a lot of different hardware with different firmwares.
    The SAS disk I have in my PC is a HP disk made by Hitachi. HP only puts their custom firmware which was designed to work with a specific machine.
     
  10. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2009
    Messages:
    9,212 (4.97/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,995
    Location:
    Home
    I thought ECC is built in? Either you have ECC or you don't? :confused:
     
  11. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Messages:
    42,565 (11.40/day)
    Thanks Received:
    9,836
    yeah, but its entire purpose is to improve stability by preventing errors from RAM.
     
  12. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2009
    Messages:
    9,212 (4.97/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,995
    Location:
    Home
    Eh, perhaps I worded my first post wrongly :eek:

    I meant to say that server RAM have ECC, and will always be tested before they leave the plant, so certification is not needed, other than just for "guarantee" reasons.
     
  13. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Messages:
    42,565 (11.40/day)
    Thanks Received:
    9,836
    different memory controllers can cause compatibility issues. servers cant risk that.
     
  14. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2009
    Messages:
    9,212 (4.97/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,995
    Location:
    Home
    That will be in specifications, no? Or servers actually certify each individual RAm for motherboards (or its controller)?
     
  15. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Messages:
    42,565 (11.40/day)
    Thanks Received:
    9,836
    if you were running a mission critical server, you'd want every damn assurance it would be perfect and never fail under your unique circumstances - temperature, humidity, motherboard, CPU, the lot.


    we're talking systems where a loss of system stability could cost thousands, or tens of thousands of dollars in the case of a failure. not a system that you can just slap in a new stick of ram and hit reboot and everyones happy.
     
    Fourstaff says thanks.
  16. TheMailMan78

    TheMailMan78 Big Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    Messages:
    21,312 (7.71/day)
    Thanks Received:
    7,795
    Mac has used Samsung RAM for years. I mean YEARS! Its good to see a new face.
     
  17. Red_Machine

    Red_Machine

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    1,763 (1.14/day)
    Thanks Received:
    389
    Location:
    Marlow, ENGLAND
    1066 is a little slow these days...
     
  18. timta2

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Messages:
    819 (0.32/day)
    Thanks Received:
    114
    Location:
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA
    I just bought a kit of 2 of these (1066 2x4GB) for my Mac and they are awesome. $35 shipped after $10 rebate. You can't beat that (Until next week :laugh: ).
     

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page