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Corsair Announces Transition Plan for Force Series Solid-state Drives

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Feb 21, 2011.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC gaming hardware market, today announced its plans for the upcoming transition from 34 nanometer to 25 nanometer flash chips used on its solid-state drives.

    “There is a lot of confusion in the market about the impact the move from 34 to 25nm flash will have on both the price and the performance of solid-state drives,” said John Beekley, VP of Technical Marketing at Corsair. “We’ve been working closely with SandForce to ensure the smoothest possible transition and we’re sharing the details today.”

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    Flash memory manufacturers are transitioning to using 25nm process for fabrication, allowing them to boost capacity and reduce costs, which in turn will allow SSD suppliers to pass those savings to the consumer. The downside is that SSDs built using 25nm flash ICs may require more over-provisioning (a technique used to ensure reliability) which lowers the capacity of the SSD and may also see a reduction in performance.

    “The Corsair and SandForce engineering teams have been working closely with the key flash memory suppliers to profile and qualify 25nm parts,” continued Beekley, “and we’ve been running our Force drives through performance and reliability testing alongside them. We’re pleased with the progress that’s been made in getting the Force Series 25nm drives ready to ship to customers.”

    In the Corsair Labs, using the ATTO synthetic benchmark, only a small reduction in performance (roughly 3-4%) was seen when testing Force Series SSDs built with 25nm flash. Real-world tests, such as copying groups of files or measuring Windows boot times, support the ATTO results and show little to no performance loss. However, the over-provisioning needed means that in some cases the capacity of the drives will be reduced.

    “So that our customers are perfectly clear about what they are getting, we will be changing the model numbers on all 25nm based drives and transitioning the drive capacities we offer where necessary. For example, a drive that would have been sold as 120GB when built with 34nm flash will be launched as a 115GB version,” said Jared Peck, Global Product Marketing Manager for SSDs at Corsair, “All Force Series drives built with 25nm flash will also have a ‘-A’ suffix on the part and/or model number, making it easy to determine exactly what you’re getting.”

    Force Series 115GB and 80GB 25nm drives will be available by the end of February from Corsair’s worldwide network of resellers and distributors. The F115-A has a Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) of $215 and the F80-A has an MSRP of $169 in the U.S. For comparison the current Force Series F120 has an MSRP of $249 and the F80 has an MSRP of $199.

    You can read more about the transition plan, including the full set of results from our Corsair Lab performance testing, on the Corsair Blog.
     
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  2. Q9650

    Q9650

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    IMO stay away from 25nm based ssd`s (QUOTE: 25nm flash ICs may require more over-provisioning which lowers the capacity of the SSD and may also see a reduction in performance..which is bad!!

    I prefer to pay that bit more for a 34nm ssd which has less over-provisioning and slightly faster like my ocz vertex2e 60gb.. it screeeams!!
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2011
  3. RejZoR

    RejZoR

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    I'm confused here. Now the price for 115GB SandForce drive is ineed a really nice one. But shouldn't new generations be better, not worse? Is the pricehere really the only benefit?
     
  4. Q9650

    Q9650

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    I would not go for a 25nm ssd cause it is still premature and i cannot see and reason to go for it besides it slightly cheaper. 34nm based ssd are more mature, faster and yes higher in price. but remember..newer technology does not always mean faster/better!
     
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  5. DanishDevil

    DanishDevil

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    Props to Corsair for divulging information upfront. This at least gives us a choice.
     
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  6. $immond$ New Member

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    Considering how the SSD market has evolved I disagree, we will just have to wait for benchmarks and reviews.
     
  7. buggalugs

    buggalugs

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    Theres nothing wrong with 25nm as long as its branded as a different model, the reduced capacity is clearly listed and the price is cheaper. They are still faster than most of the competition.

    Ocz screwed up by selling them as the same model, same capacity for the same price.

    Anyway the 6GBs drives are coming out in a couple of weeks that are twice as fast and use 25nm nand. Better off waiting for those.
     
  8. Aleksander

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    One thing i don't get is:
    Why the ssd transitions faster than GPUs and they have reached 25nm
    instead the gpus are in 40nm technology yet
    This means that ssd sellers get more money so they can produce more or what???
     
  9. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

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    You can easily provision for errors in the SSD (as the article shown above), but the same cannot be said for the GPUs (or CPUs, for that matter). We just need to wait a bit more for the 25nm to mature and give us good increase in performance, and decrease in price :)
     
  10. jsfitz54

    jsfitz54

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    I think the inhouse testing does it. They already have said it's slower.
     
  11. ASharp New Member

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    Well they would be stupid not to considering the lash back that OCZ got when they silently started putting 25nm drives on the market. :laugh:
     
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  12. NAVI_Z

    NAVI_Z New Member

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