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CYBERPOWERPC Teams Up with Newegg to Launch $299 "Everyman Quad Core" System

Discussion in 'News' started by Cristian_25H, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. Cristian_25H

    Cristian_25H News Poster

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    CyberPower Inc., a manufacturer of custom gaming machines, notebook systems, and high performance workstations, has teamed with leading online retail partner Newegg to offer the Everyman Quad Core (EQ100) - an AMD Sempron 3850 Kabini powered desktop system that makes quad core computing practical for everyday use. The CYBERPOWERPC EQ100 arrives just in time for Father's Day and will be available June 13-15 fully-loaded at $299.99 at www.newegg.com.

    Pre-built with AMD's Sempron 3850 Kabini APU, the Everyman Quad Core delivers quad-core performance to consumers with two SATA 6 Gbps ports, two USB 3.0 ports, four USB 2.0 ports, a PCIe x16 2.0 slot for graphic card upgrades, and a pair of video outputs (HDMI, and VGA). The AMD system-in-a-socket platform provides up to 3x more computing performance than its competitors.

    [​IMG]

    "CYBERPOWERPC shares our vision for affordable quad core computing and is among the first US system builders to pioneer using the AM1 platform, together with Newegg. These systems include the right set of features you need for day-to-day computing and has effectively launched Everyman Quad Core revolution," said Roy Taylor, VP Global Channel Sales at AMD.

    The base $299.99 CYBERPOWERPC EQ100 includes:
    • CPU - AMD Sempron 3850 1.3 GHz Quad-core Processor
    • Memory - 4 GB (1x4 GB) DDR3 1600 MHz
    • Hard Drive - 500 GB SATA III 7200 RPM
    • Optical Drive 1 - 24x DVD±R/±RW DUAL LAYER DRIVE
    • Graphics - AMD Radeon HD 8280 Onboard
    • Audio - Integrated 7.1 Channel Audio
    • Ethernet - 10/100/1000 Mbps
    • Power Supply - 500 W
    • Keyboard - USB Gaming Keyboard
    • Mouse - USB Gaming Mouse
    • Operating System - Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
    • Special Features - Azza EOS-206S Gaming Case
    • Motherboard - Built in AMD Sempron & Athlon-Series Socket AM1
      1x PCI-E x16 (Gen 2)
      2x PCI-E x1 (available)
      2x DIMM Slots (DDR3 1333/1600), 32 GB max
      3x 3.5mm audio ports
      Input/Output - 4x USB 2.0 (2 rear), 2x USB 3.0 (2 rear), 2x PS/2, Front Headphone/Microphone ports, RJ45, VGA, HDMI
    • Warranty - 1 Year Limited Warranty and Lifetime Toll-free Technical Support Services

    The CYBERPOWERPC EQ100 is pre-built but can be easily customized with a number of performance hardware and component upgrades such as gaming graphics cards, solid state drives and storage hard drives, performance memory, peripherals and business software to enhance your productivity.
     
  2. CJCerny

    CJCerny

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    I've been running an Athlon 5350 as my main rig now for a couple of weeks. I'm not poor--I'm just cheap. You can game on the integrated graphics, as long as you don't expect much and don't go past 1280x1024. It never uses more than about 35 watts total even under serious stress. It also has 4 lanes of PCI-Express 2.0 to which you can connect a graphics card and the results I've seen so far indicate that it isn't bottlenecking a discrete graphics card at lower resolutions.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014
  3. TRWOV

    TRWOV

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    Several parts of that bundle seem extremely overkill and don't exploit the advantages of the platform. 500w PSU? The base config wouldn't even get to 60w, tops. Azza gaming case? For an embedded system? o_O

    These would go great in a slim case with an FSP 300w SFX PSU. Maybe they want to offer the convenience of dropping in a full height GPU but even so why go with a mid tower case then?
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014
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  4. The Von Matrices

    The Von Matrices

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    Use a smaller PSU and a smaller case and eliminate the DVD drive. Now you have a $249 system that isn't perceptibly worse than the $299 system.
     
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  5. Casecutter

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    Yea, on the same page why 500W, mid-tower... and the 1x4Gb stick, that means no dual channel. Not sure how it hurts performance, but I wouldn't consider getting another stick into it.

    It would've been nice with a discreet appearance Mico-ATX tower with just a good ATX 350 PSU that was 80+ (Bronze) (saves on cost for a SFX PSU) then a easy $230 price.

    This has me thinking they're hoping to fool people into think it's some great upgrade gaming box by just stuffing a R7 270 in it because it already has a 500W PSU.
     
  6. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.1641686
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822148767
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820313423
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827136270

    $191.97 :cool:

    I've pumped out 5 or 6 of these for old people in the last month or so since AM1 game out. But once you include the $99 for Windows, Cyberpower's price actually isn't that far off, surprisingly.

    This isn't technically an embedded system.

    AM1 is single-channel only, so it doesn't matter.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2014
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  7. TRWOV

    TRWOV

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    yeah, you're right. I read "Motherboard - Built in AMD Sempron & Athlon-Series Socket AM1" and got confused.
     
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  8. NC37

    NC37

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    Because all men for fathers day want a cheap underpowered lackluster PC that they'll chuck about as fast as they realize how crappy it is. That is if it lasts that long. For that price I'd guess all the parts are ones that have a lifespan of about 1 week.
     
  9. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    Honestly, my Father In Law loved the Sempron 3850 machine I built for him. It allows him to do everything he needs to do on a PC. The AM1 platform might be inexpensive, but they definitely get the job done if you aren't looking to play games or do any type of rendering.

    As for the quality of the components, they are using a Gigabyte board that normally comes with a 3 year warranty if you buy it by itself. Yeah it isn't a high end motherboard, but it should last no problem. The power supply is a bit questionable, but I've certainly seen far worse powering systems that consume a lot more power. And that is the thing with AM1 computers, they consume so little power, even the most generic power supply can handle the load. When you have an entire system that will never go above 100w under full load, a generic 500w power supply is going to handle it just fine. The same goes with the motherboards. You don't need all solid caps on a motherboard that is powering a 25w processor.
     
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  10. Steevo

    Steevo

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    This is a good everyday machine, where people aren't transcoding video, working with music, playing modern video games, or bit mining. For facebook, email, netflix, youtube, looking at cell phone pics and online banking? It still has too much power.
     
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  11. TheinsanegamerN

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    [QUOTE="newtekie1, post: 3122946, member:


    AM1 is single-channel only, so it doesn't matter.[/QUOTE]

    So, if you were to put another stick of memory in the system, would each one be running on a 32 bit bus? or does each one run at half speed? I know you can use two, but im not sure what happens technically.
     
  12. john_

    john_

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    I built a Sempron 3850, 15 days ago to be my HTPC. It does everything great. The feeling when on the desktop is as good as on my quad core AM3. Browsing is great, flash games are smooth, 1080p movies are no problem. But it does have it's limitations. Where ultra hi definition videos don't have hardware decoding support, it just can't do it because of the limited cpu processing power. It can't play 1080p H265, for example. But this is something you are expecting. It is also dead silent, and I mean dead silent. I mean dead silent with 30 degrees Celsius in a hot summer day this period in Athens. It's just perfect for the typical every day tasks with minimal power consumption and almost zero noise.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2014
  13. The Von Matrices

    The Von Matrices

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    It's better to think of this in terms of memory ranks. Each side of the DIMM with memory chips is a rank, so a dual-sided DIMM has two ranks and two dual-sided DIMMs have four ranks - you don't need two DIMMs to have multiple ranks. (There are exceptions to this and some single sided DIMMs have two ranks.) Each rank in a DIMMs is 64-bits wide. All ranks share the same data bus, so when you have multiple ranks, the memory controller can only address one rank at a time in order to prevent collisions on the data bus. Ranks aren't interleaved like if they ran as two separate 32-bit buses or four 16-bit buses.

    There are some clever techniques that the memory controller uses to optimize with multiple ranks (e.g. reading from one rank while the other is charging) but the tradeoff is that by adding more ranks, the electrical load is increased and you can't run the memory bus at as high a frequency. Therefore, with all things equal (timings, frequency, capacity, price) it makes sense to buy the DIMM or DIMMs with the fewest number of ranks.

    In contrast, memory chips within each rank are interleaved. Since the rank always has a 64-bit bus, then if you double the chips per rank then each chip must have half the bus width. So a DIMM with 8 chips per rank/side will use 8-bit memory chips while a DIMM with 16 chips per rank/side will use 4-bit memory chips. This is similar in graphics cards - they usually use 32-bit GDDR5 chips but a few cards with large memory capacity (e.g. GTX Titan) have double the memory chips and each chip runs at 16-bit.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2014
  14. Steevo

    Steevo

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  15. The Von Matrices

    The Von Matrices

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    Given the same memory frequency and timings, that is completely reasonable that more ranks will result in higher performance due to memory controller optimizations. However, since the difference will only be a few percent, you are still better off with fewer ranks since you can clock the memory bus at a higher frequency and more than make up the difference. That article you reference shows a performance increase of ~5% by using dual-rank DIMMs but a performance increase of ~15% by using DDR3-2400 instead of DDR3-1866.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2014
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  16. MikeMurphy

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    Interesting points. Thanks for this.
     
  17. 9700 Pro

    9700 Pro

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    Fractal Core 1000/1500 or similar simple and good-looking would be a wiser case choice to a PC like this, instead of that toy-looking space-case.
     

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