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DC-DC step-down converter module w/ screw securing

Discussion in 'Cases, Modding & Electronics' started by Kantastic, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. Kantastic

    Kantastic

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    Hey guys, I'm trying to add a BlueTooth module to my desktop based on a guide I found online, and am in need of something similar or (preferably) exactly like this:
    [​IMG]

    The purpose is to lower the 5V output from an internal USB 2.0 header down to 3.3V in order for it to not fry the internal BlueTooth module. The original guide for making the BlueTooth assembly linked to an eBay ad (where I took the photo from) and it was listed as "DC-DC Converter Module regulator In:4.75-6V Out:3.3V", but the seller has since sold out so I'm forced to look elsewhere.

    What's important is that it has the two green securing mechanisms on both ends so that I don't have to solder (I neither know how nor have the tools).

    I've looked on Amazon, eBay, and the usual places I can think of but haven't been able to find that exact item. I'm no good with circuitry, so I'm wary about purchasing something that looks similar without advisement from some of the experts here. Does anyone here know where I can pick up something like this?

    Edit: I FOUND SOMETHING! Would something like this serve the same purpose?
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
  2. bencrutz

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    why don't you take 3.3v from the PSU directly?

    edit:
    in ATX PSU standard i think the 3.3V lines are the orange cable. so you would only take the orange for +3.3V and black for the ground to feed power to the bluetooth module.

    edit: edit: :p
    if it's too risky for you to tap into the ATX connector's 3.3v, you can take the orange line from the SATA power connector, it is also 3.3V :toast:


    edit: edit: edit: :banghead:
    your psu sata power connector may lack the 3.3v line, it's pretty common that the psu manufacturer omits the 3.3v line :laugh:
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2014
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  3. Kantastic

    Kantastic

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    I have no clue, but I assume it has something to do with wanting a wake-from-sleep function. Here's an excerpt from the guide:

    "These modules run on 3.3v DC and although most modern PCs have a 3.3V DC line from the power supply, it usually is not a constant 3.3v. If the PC goes to sleep, you loose that 3.3v (I canʼt confirm this works this way on all motherboards or power supplies, but it does on my Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD5). The solution is to drop the 5v from a USB header (or external connector) to 3.3v"
     
  4. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    Yes, all these cheap modules should work fine. At the core is that big black chip which does all the magic. It basically takes a wide input voltage and converts that to a specified output voltage.

     
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  5. Kantastic

    Kantastic

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    I ended up buying this one: http://www.ebay.com/itm/310683469698

    I figured I could benefit from the voltmeter since I had no way of monitoring the variable voltage output on the more basic ones. My only concern is that the one I ordered supposedly outputs a steady 2A. Should I be concerned.?
     
  6. Frick

    Frick Fishfaced Nincompoop

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    That means it can output (or whatever the correct expression is) up to 2A.
     
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