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Direct LAN gaming setup

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by Artas1984, Aug 2, 2013.

  1. Artas1984

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    I've had many problems over the years configuring a direct TCP/IP setup for 1 VS 1 LAN gaming. Mostly due to incorrect addresses or antivirus blocking. Still i've managed to resolve the problems.

    I am using the standart IP setup: 192.168.2.1 for PC1 and 192.168.2.2 for PC2.

    First question:

    Does the subnet mask and default gateway matter? I just leave the subnet mask 255.255.0.0
    and the default gateway i leave empty. Or should i not?

    Second question:

    I have a dual RJ45 motherboard. One is connected to the internet, the other to the LAN. But if LAN is enabled between the 2 computers, my internet connection is lost. How to resolve that?

    Third question:

    Since i have dual LAN motherboard, could i host a LAN sever for 2 other computers? So that 3 people could play in one server?
     
  2. McSteel

    McSteel

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    So what's wrong with spending $15-20 on a basic LAN switch?

    Your subnet is wrong. You need to have it at 255.255.255.0 , not 255.255.0.0
    For pure LAN access, best leave the gateway empty.

    If you use dual LAN, you need to pay attention to adapter binding order, if you want your internet to work, when your PC is also directly connected to another via LAN cable. Internet should go through the adapter that is on top (first) in the binding order.

    You probably can't host a LAN server over two different adapters. Your PC would have two different IP addresses over two different MACs, and I'm not sure many games would be able to send/receive packets through two separate sources/destinations at once. I can't be 100% sure, though, because I've never been bonkers enough to try it, and not all games are created equal.

    Buy a switch.
     
  3. Artas1984

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    Can i bridge the 2 different Ethernet ports somehow and make them use a single IP so that 2 other computers could connect to me?

    I have no problem buying a LAN switch, however... I bought this expensive Asus Z68 Deluxe motherboard not for good looks. What's the use of the 2 different Ethernet ports if can not use them at the same time?
     
  4. RCoon

    RCoon Gaming Moderator Staff Member

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    You didnt buy the motherboard for two LAN ports, if you did then... yeah...
    Buy a switch that costs nothing.
    If you dont need the internet, buy a single crossover cable and plug it between you and your friends machine. Job done.
    If you need internet, plug a LAN cable into your second ethernet port connecting to the internet, then bridge both ethernet ports.
     
  5. slyfox2151

    slyfox2151

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    Redundancy, Teaming and Wank factor :D


    Best option is to just buy a switch. You can use both at the same time but it can be a real pain to setup properly.

    Cross-over cables are so old school lol :D modern adapters should be able to detect the correct mode.
     
  6. RCoon

    RCoon Gaming Moderator Staff Member

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    When I was at school me and my friend chewed through a LAN cable so we could twist it into a crossover cable and cellotaped it. Played CS 1.6 for a year before the teachers caught on that we were playing LAN games on their laptops. Wireless was too laggy.
     
  7. McSteel

    McSteel

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    A bridge works in theory - you get one IP and one (virtual) MAC for all bridged adapters. However, it adds processing overhead, latency, and doesn't work for all games/applications, especially ones that rely on UDP communication.
     
  8. Artas1984

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    No i did not.

    These days routers have build in switches. What would be the difference between a switch and router for LAN setup only?

    It's what i have been doing for the last 10 years...:rolleyes:

    Well i have not done this before. But i assume that bridging the two ports will mess up my internet later on, i will be able to unbridge the ports later, yes or no?

    I assume Starcraft, for instance, will not work then?
     
    RCoon says thanks.
  9. McSteel

    McSteel

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    You can un-bridge at any time, of course. I believe Windows will even keep your individual (pre-bridge) LAN ports' settings.

    Dedicated switches are substantially cheaper (if comparing between devices that are any good at all), and very rarely, some (lousy) routers will add some noticeable (10+ ms) latency, that's all.

    Starcraft might work over a bridge, you'll have to try. I know CS has some problems with that approach (and it's on UDP as well).
     

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