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Don't Kill Bacteria, Disable It.

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by Kreij, Oct 28, 2011.

  1. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    This is a bit long, but well worth the read ....

     
    qubit and Black Panther say thanks.
  2. Inceptor

    Inceptor

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    Interesting.
    Looks like we're going to be saved from the antibiotic resistant bacteria. At least for a generation (or two); I wonder how long it will take for mutated bacteria, that these new methods don't affect, to take over the bacterial population and force us to come up with another method.
     
  3. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    Given the mutation rate of cellular organisms, I give it about a week. :D
     
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  4. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    Here's another. Viruses, not bacteria, this time ...
     
  5. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    About two years ago on NHPR, a woman researcher was speaking about how bacteria "attack" a host.

    Short story... bacteria produce toxins to damage the host BUT... only after the colony of bacteria had reached significant enough number/size where a chemical message is triggered that tells the bacteria to release the toxins. In other words, most bacteria are harmless until they reach a critical mass. It makes sense. If they weren't numerous enough, they wouldn't be able to stage enough of an attack to weaken the host and sufficiently keep multipling.

    So this woman was working on a means to negate that chemical message. The bacteria wouldn't do much harm to the host and give the host time to kill off the bacteria by natural means.

    But, she ended the talk by saying that the bacteria would certainly evolve some resitance, as they always do.

    Microphages, anyone?
     
  6. Inceptor

    Inceptor

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    That worries me. How do they know it won't have some kind of systemic effect they're not immediately aware of?
    They need to do some testing.
     
  7. WhiteLotus

    WhiteLotus

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    Finally someone who understands genetic changes in a reproducing organism
     

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