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Elpida Completes Development of the Industry's Smallest 40nm 2-gigabit DDR3 SDRAM

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Oct 8, 2009.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Elpida Memory, Inc., Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced that it had finished development of the smallest high-speed low-power 40nm 2-gigabit DDR3 SDRAM in the DRAM industry.

    The new 2-gigabit DDR3 SDRAM uses a smaller chip size to achieve a 44% higher chip yield per wafer compared with Elpida's 50nm DDR3 SDRAM and a 100% yield for DDR3 products that operate at 1.6Gbps, the highest speed standard for current DDR3. Compared with 50nm products, it uses about two-thirds less current and supports 1.2V/1.35V operation as well as DDR3 standard 1.5V, thus reducing power consumption by as much as 45%.

    The development of the DRAM using a 40nm process focused on both performance and cost competitiveness. As a result, the investment cost of converting from 50nm manufacturing to 40nm manufacturing is expected to be almost zero. Moreover, a 65nm to 40nm process conversion can be accomplished with greater investment efficiency compared with a 65nm to 50nm conversion.

    In addition to finer process technologies Elpida is also developing 65nm XS process technology that can compete with the 50nm process of other companies. Another development effort recently underway aims to produce smaller die size products based on the 65nm process.

    Given this range of development choices, Elpida will have greater flexibility to deal with changing market conditions and in making decisions about the timing of investment in 40nm process equipment and the content of technology licensed to its Taiwan partners.

    Elpida intends to increase 40nm process production to further reduce die costs. Meanwhile, the company continues to pursue higher productivity. The changeover as of July to a product-specific manufacturing system (separately managed manufacturing lines for mobile and PC-related products) at Elpida's Hiroshima Plant has already boosted yields. The combination of these cost savings and productivity improvements is expected to make Elpida more competitive. Also, depending on future DRAM market conditions, Elpida believes it may be possible to increase the ratio of 40nm process line output to as much as 50% of total production.

    Sample shipments of the 40nm 2-gigabit DDR3 SDRAM will start in November. Mass production is expected to begin before the end of 2009.
  2. 3870x2

    3870x2

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    gigabit? I thought ram was measured in GB? or is it referring to the individual module?
  3. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    It might be each chip is actually 256mb.

    8 chips per ram module for 2 GB.
  4. 3870x2

    3870x2

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    i figured as much. Pardon my ignorance on the matter, I overclock ram and all, but when it comes to actual components that the company makes for it, im somewhat in the dark.
  5. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    Aww man, you don't want to know how long it took me to realise ISPs in my country advertise in BITS not bytes.

    Was always wondering why my internet was so slow ha ha
  6. DanishDevil

    DanishDevil

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    Posted literally seconds after I ordered a set of G.Skill Ripjaws from Newegg :roll:
  7. Steevo

    Steevo

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    Damn you all for your youth, I had internet in 14kilobits per second. Or a Hughes earth station for 256K, it only cost 19,000 USD. And the fans and the large green boxes, and the stupid cables.
    10 Million points folded for TPU
  8. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    I had 14.4 Kb/s for a long time as well as two 56 Kb/s lines. 14.4 Kb/s was faster than ADSL today, relatively speaking, because websites were kept lean and mean knowing that very few people had very fast Internet access. ADSL is slow to today's standards of what web developers assume you have (all the massive images, Flash, and Java applets).
    Crunching for Team TPU
  9. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

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    It also has a lot to do with the huge influx of users. Back when 14.4 was the best you could get for a reasonable price, it was something new and very people per ca-pita had the mythical "Interwebs" (sorry for the joke I use to love friends at school who said that). Now people without the Internet are the vast minority and in the US (as much as we hate it) dial-up and ADSL are the two most widely used internet access systems.
  10. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi New Member

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    I hate that about nowadays websites
  11. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    same.

    flash (as in, animated flash) websites are the #1 surefire way to make me never buy products from that site.


    on topic, yes these are 1Gb (128MB) 'per module'.

    8 modules on one stick of ram = 1GB sticks. small by todays standards, but these are 40nm and operate at extremely low voltages (1.2v, as opposed to JEDEC standards of 1.5v)

    This ram will be awesome for portable devices like phones, PDA's, MP3 players and the like - and when they ramp up capacity, netbooks and finally laptops.
  12. inferKNOX

    inferKNOX

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    Yes it is.
    The low voltage sound great. It'd really go well with AMD's Phenom II's and Athlon II's that don't like high volted RAM.:)
    Hmph, hope to get some one day...:cry:
  13. IceCreamBarr New Member

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    So these chips make 4GB sticks? My math says, 2 Gb chip = 256MB chip. 16 chips per module = 4GB... accurate numbers?

    Barr
  14. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    That's how I work it out too.

    But I think initial batches will be 1 or 2 gb.
  15. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    i failed my math, i saw gigabit and missed the 2 - so yeah, these are 2Gb modules that would make 2GB sticks

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