1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

extremely slow transfer in wifi 802.11n

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by jetmantrunks, Oct 14, 2010.

  1. jetmantrunks New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Messages:
    4 (0.00/day)
    Thanks Received:
    0
    i've lately purchased an edimax BR-6424n wireless router and have connected my win xp pc to it directly with LAN and my win7 laptop using wifi.
    up untill a few days ago i've been using my built in laptop wifi adapter (b/g) and got around 35% signal strength and could transfer files from my laptop to my desktop at around 1.5-2.5MBps.
    this seemed very slowed to me so i've purchased a usb wifi adapter with a 5dbi antenna which claims to be 300mbps (in 802.11n on 40mhz). after installing it's drivers i can see on it's control panel (realtek 11n software) that my Tx and Rx keep jumping around, but even when they are Tx:150 Mbps, Rx:300 (or is it the other way around? i forgot) i still get only around 1.5-2.5MBps transfer between my desktop and laptop (a bit slower when uploading from my latop to my desktop).
    the realtek control panel states my link quality is 98-100% and signal strength bounces around 58-60%. any idea why i get such low speeds?

    also i can choose to keep both my built in laptop wifi adapter connected to my router on 802.11g and my usb wifi adapter connected to 802.11n, is that supposed to improve my connection or will it just use the best connection?

    stats:
    *my router is configured to use either 20 or 40mhz automatically
    *my router transmits on 2.4ghz(B+G+N)
    *Tx power on my router is set to 100%
    *when i look at my active wireless clients i see my built in wifi and usb wifi adapters at such:
    802.11 PhyMode Power Save BandWidth
    OFDM ON 20M (the built in one if im not mistaken)
    HTMIX OFF 40M
  2. CrackerJack

    CrackerJack

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    2,705 (1.10/day)
    Thanks Received:
    449
    Location:
    East TN
    those speeds sounds about right, little tweak might help. i get the same. what network card you using on desktop
  3. Batou1986

    Batou1986

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2005
    Messages:
    2,446 (0.75/day)
    Thanks Received:
    342
    Location:
    Baltimore MD
    that's about right for N 150, wired 100mb lan i get 10 Mb/s gigabit lan nets around 100Mb/s

    Long story short if you want high speed transfers get a gigabit router and use wired connections
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2010
  4. theonedub

    theonedub habe fidem

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    7,131 (3.66/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3,658
    Sub'd

    I get 512-800 KB/s over G (on a good day!) and 1.5MB/sec over N :eek: Just awful.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  5. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    4,998 (2.57/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,291
    Location:
    Marietta, GA USA
    Sounds about right. There is a lot of overhead involved in that connection. Your data is being encapsulated, changed to a wireless single, possible encrypted depending your router settings, transferred to the router, verified, transmitted to another computer, and then translated back to a file. You can improve it by setting it to N only or G/N only, making sure the channels you are using are not being used by a lot of other people in the area (only important if you live in an apartment), and turning off any encryption.

    Dual connects can improve throughput, but they would have to be bound together. If the are not linked together it will just use the fastest one available. It could also use the one built in to board and ignore the adapter all together. I am not sure. Hit Ctrl+alt+del and look at the network traffic to see what adapter is transmitting.
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2010
  6. jetmantrunks New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Messages:
    4 (0.00/day)
    Thanks Received:
    0
    crackerjack its just a generic 10/100mbps card i believe, never really put much thought to it.

    TheLaughingMan i just changed it to N only (no option for n+g) and didnt see much change if any.
    i already used inSSIDer a few days ago to see which channels are flooded and decided to go with channel 2 with channel 1 being empty, and 1 other connection on 3 since that connection is set to channel 4 and is leaking to 3. i believe you know what i mean even though im not that good at explaining it.

    also i've used wpa at first but then changed to wpa2 a week ago, but it shouldnt matter speed-wise, right?

    i've been told to turn off the onboard wifi because making the router work with one client on g and one on n would just slow it down.

    btw i've noticed that my Rx and Tx jump around a lot, my Tx i sometimes as low as 30 and my Rx only 1, is that normal
  7. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    4,998 (2.57/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,291
    Location:
    Marietta, GA USA
    Good, forcing it to use the adapter you want should help.

    Fluctuation in power is normal. You may want to try turning off your laptop's power management to minimize it doing that.

    Also, I meant no encryption at all. No WPA of any kind. It will help, but not by much.

    What are you trying to do. If you are just transferring some files, wire the laptop into the router with a Cat5 and transfer the files. It will be 30 to 40 times faster. Then you can move smaller files as needed with what you have now.
  8. CrackerJack

    CrackerJack

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    2,705 (1.10/day)
    Thanks Received:
    449
    Location:
    East TN
    then those speeds are perfectly normal. you would need a 1gb router to get any speed increase...
  9. jetmantrunks New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Messages:
    4 (0.00/day)
    Thanks Received:
    0
    TheLaughingMan the power saving is off, its no use to me since my laptop is almost always connevted to the power because it's battery is almost dead now, managing barely 20 minutes.

    no encryption would be too risky considering im in a 5 story apartment building with 15 other networks all secured and probably isnt worth the risk of someone hacking me or the hassel of mac filtering.

    yes im transferring large files 200-700mb. up untill now i've used usb flash drives to transfer files i need fast since i get an upload rate of about 5MBps and a download rate of 10-11MBps. can the cat5 grant me faster speeds?
    also im not really familiar with cat5, how can i check if my rj-45 is a cat5? and i need a regular or a crossed one?


    CrackerJack that type of router would be too expensive i think. is the 300mbps promise of 802.11n really such an exaggeration? even when considering overhead and all its still very disappointing
  10. CrackerJack

    CrackerJack

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    2,705 (1.10/day)
    Thanks Received:
    449
    Location:
    East TN
    your wireless may support 300mbps, but your lan card doesn't. it's only max 100mbps.. which you'll almost never get. but if your do wireless to wireless transfer then you'll better results, which in your case your doing wired to wireless. so the speeds your getting is perfectly normal. like i said before, you can tweak a few settings.



    *note, i get those exact same speeds on this network setup
    F5D8233-4 Router
    Built-In Realtek Network- 10/100/1000 speeds
    Wireless laptop/desktop on the G network (Even if they were N, the speeds wouldn't be affected much)

    The whole "B" "G" "N" "N1" Wasn't built just on speed bases, but for range.
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2010
  11. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    4,998 (2.57/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,291
    Location:
    Marietta, GA USA
    "mbps" does not equal "Mbps" The unit of measure you and windows use to monitor your network speed is a much larger unit of measure than the wireless N rating standard.

    802.11n (Variable 300.0 Mbit/s Max or variable 37.5 MB/s Max)

    What you are getting is normal and the best you are going to get in your environment. Even if you are on a clear channel their is still signal interference, signal lose due to passing through walls, error correction, etc. You are not doing anything wrong, except having unrealistic expectations.

    And Encrypting your data and securing your wireless network are two different things as well. Encryption prevents people from copying your packets (blocks of data) and viewing your information. Security locking your network does not prevent me from viewing/downloading your data packets. It does however prevent me from logging onto your router as user. This prevents people from using your Internet service that you paid for and viewing any shared information on your network.

    Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-X) = 1,000 Mbit/s or 125 MB/s

    If they will both be jacked into a router, you need standard Cat5 cables. If you are going to connect it directly from one computer to another.....don't because it is a pain in the ass. Long story short, a Ethernet cable is about 10 times faster than your thumb drive...well 20 since copy is only done once.

    How to tell if the RJ45 is a Cat5. If it was made in the last 12 years or so, it is CAT5 or better. It should also have CAT5e patch cable written on the wire somewhere.
  12. francis511

    francis511

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    2,547 (0.88/day)
    Thanks Received:
    271
    Location:
    N.Ireland
    I usually get 6-10 mbps on wireless-n. 2-3 is normal for for g not n. Win 7 helps a lot. Try moving the antennae if you can which does actually work ! Try sending the files from both ends of the connection as well.
  13. theonedub

    theonedub habe fidem

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Messages:
    7,131 (3.66/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3,658
    If you aren't even cracking 1MB with G what are some things to look at? I've tried Netsh commands, disabling RDC, disabling Remote connections and nothing helps.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  14. jetmantrunks New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Messages:
    4 (0.00/day)
    Thanks Received:
    0
    yes i know, thats what i meant, and is why i also was careful to clearly mark MBps and mbps on my previous posts. i means 3.5 Mbps is very disappointing compared to the 37.5MBps promise. even with the 100mbps desktop bottle neck.


    to get the speeds your talking about i will have to replace my desktop and somehow also my laptop's network adapters since they only support 10/100 mbps, right? otherwise the very best i can hope for would be 12.5 MBps. would the router also have to be replaced? where can i check if it supports these speeds?
    and thanks for all the help :)
  15. andrew123 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Messages:
    30 (0.02/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3
    Location:
    Canada
    If you're using Gigabit, some nice Cat6 patch cords will provide the best connection. (More Twist, Slightly smaller gauge and pair separation).

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page