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Food for discussion: Cloud vs. Servers

Discussion in 'Storage' started by Sasqui, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    Last edited: Apr 29, 2013
  2. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    yup, cloud is more expensive than individual servers for most scenarios.

    if you have huge load spikes it might end up cheaper though, because you don't have to have tons of servers that sit idle at night.

    cloud also gives you more flexibility in terms of resources, backup, fault tolerance (you can move virtual machines between physical machines without any downtime).

    at tpu we don't use cloud hosting because none of the advantages is big enough to justify the significantly higher cost

    if you need a very lightweight "server", then a VPS (virtual private server) is definitely the best option because you share an expensive physical machine with other customers, obviously someone makes a profit in the middle, but it's usually still cheaper for you than getting a dedicated server.
     
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  3. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    That's an interesting takeaway. I'm sure there are other services included in cloud storage that might make the cost differential worth it, but what you say (and the article) it's about economy of scale and the geographic situation that may make cloud services more cost efficient or sometimes just plain cheaper.
     
  4. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    geography makes no difference in my opinion, you can get servers anywhere where you can get cloud

    i do think that one day a company will offer cloud at pricing that's equal or better to dedicated servers (they'd still make a profit due to more efficient use of the server's hardware plus the normal markup you'd have to pay for a dedicated anyway). and that will bring a revolution and tons of money for that company. it does need a few million investment though and why take such a chance if you can just price it as high as currently and people still go for it
     
  5. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    it is only cheaper to upgrade your existing dedicated server because you have the manpower already in place to manage it. however, if you are a small company starting out then it makes more sense to purchase cloud space. the skills of your in-house talent pool should determine the best course of action.
     
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  6. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    i fail to see the argument. renting a dedicated is cheaper than cloud and has no upfront investment either. you obviously need someone to admin the server, no matter if cloud or dedicated
     
  7. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    The rental of dedicated space curiously wasn't even mentioned in that article. On some level (to the customer), it's almost the same. Data is stored offsite on some magic box.

    I presume in either case, there would need to be IT personnel (either on staff or contract) on the client side.
     
  8. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    ah ok, the article talks only in the context of storage. i was talking about web servers.

    storage is pretty much free nowadays. if you just need a lot (10 TB+) you definitely need to go colocation, placing your own hardware into a datacenter where you rent a rack location, power and internet connectivity.

    so much storage means you're running a real business making real money which means IT infrastructure will cost money, no way around it.

    on the other hand if i'm working as sysadmin in some big company having my safe salary, i'd probably just blow the company's money on cloud and enjoy my life
     
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  9. remixedcat

    remixedcat

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    Cloud gives you failover
     
  10. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    dedicated does, too.

    if the physical machine fails where your cloud instances are, you need to spin up new instances and your software stack is better built for that.

    you could do the same with a spare dedicated server, infrastructure-wise 100% the same.

    if you have just 1 dedicated, then having a spare will double the cost -> cloud should be more cost effective, this becomes smaller and turns around the more servers you have
     
  11. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    we're paying $39.95 per month for our backup storage server. 3 TB disk, 1000 mbit connection, unmetered incoming. no way you can match that with cloud
     
  12. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    That's not too shabby!
     
  13. remixedcat

    remixedcat

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    Kinda like hybrid cloud.. cool.
     
  14. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    Is that on a SAN using iSCSI or is it an actual network device that you just connect to using something like rsync and ssh? The dedicated servers I work with that are hosted at Rackspace just do scheduled rsyncs.
     
  15. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    It's an Atom server with 2 HDDs, so we can run actual stuff on it.
     
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  16. Geekoid New Member

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    Private "cloud" is the way I've gone. The nice cost of "traditional" servers, with a lot of "cloud" features. Plus, I like playing with toys :)
     
  17. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    Still have to get an external HDD for my ASUS router, looking at a 1TB Canvio. Personal cloud including AOS and iOS support. Speed may be questionable with USB 2.0 and Comcast speed cap.
     
  18. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    i think people are confusing hosted solutions and cloud technology (the article itself is technically incorrect). cloud technology is where the hardware can scale up or down depending on load.

    hosted solutions can use cloud tech to their advantage or purchase dedi boxes and set everything up in house or allow colocation by clients.

    for the end user small business startup, cloud is much cheaper. you only pay a small monthly charge for the virtual hardware you need. you don't have to pay some dude in house 70-100,000 per year to manage it.

    for a large business with an IT apparatus already in place going dedi for critical applications is cheaper and wiser. those companies already are paying their IT staff to manage systems and have large budgets to upgrade every few years. although you will see more and more large corporations going with hosted solutions for some small solutions and general those hosted solutions are using cloud technology to offer a wider range of products and availability.

    so "going to the cloud" as the author suggests is not very accurate. you can run your own cloud software in house on a dedi box you built yourself ( I wonder what the author thinks about that?) or you can pay a hosting company who happens to use cloud tech to their advantage. pretty fail article if you ask me.
     
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