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Game publishing question

Discussion in 'Games' started by Aleksander, Feb 3, 2013.

  1. Aleksander

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    Why some publishers show off their game way before its release, meanwhile others remain silent?
     
  2. Frick

    Frick Fishfaced Nincompoop

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    Different approaches to marketing.
     
  3. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    Most game developers/publishers will not wait until final release to promote their games.
    They want to build anticipation (hype) and interest in the game during development.
    This can be a double-edged sword as if the hype and expectation is much greater than the product that is released, the game will get trashed in player reviews as they will feel let down.
    This is more prominent in cases when a game sequel has taken years. Case in point, Duke Nukem.
     
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  4. Frick

    Frick Fishfaced Nincompoop

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    Another example where it went bad is Black & White. The game was good, but not the GOD ALMIGHTY Peter Whatshisname made it to be. On the other side of the coin we have Valve who could release a HL title tomorrow without any kind of promotion and it would still fly off the digital shelves.
     
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  5. Aleksander

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    I think it is wrong that they publish a game before its release, even though it might be a very notorious game.
    Anyway, either approach has its ups and downs
     
  6. erocker

    erocker Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't think it's wrong.. It is their product and as far as I'm concerned they can do what they want with it.
     
  7. razaron

    razaron

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    You have to know a game exists to be able to pre-order or save up some money for it.
     
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  8. Frag Maniac

    Frag Maniac

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    Not every publisher uses the same strategy every time. I think it depends a lot on whether there's been any major studio changes in the dev team of a given game and any major changes within a given game series. For instance the Hitman series underwent both changes, which is why I think Eidos chose to let players know well ahead of time what they were doing with Absolution via example gameplay footage. They probably knew some of the long time series fans would be upset with some of the changes, and that they'd have to count on bringing in new players to the series. It seems to have worked for them, and while some long time Hitman fanatics were pretty upset, most seemed to roll with the changes, myself included.

    Another example is Sleeping Dogs, which underwent HUGE changes. It was not only quite a departure from it's original True Crime series roots, it got a new publisher midway through development with an extensive graphics makeover, and was developed by a new dev team assembled from developers from prior teams. They wanted to make sure fans knew about the game and that it wouldn't just be another True Crime, or another GTA. They needed to showcase the differences via gameplay footage. While their sales weren't as high as anticipated, they later said they probably had unrealistic expectations, and that overall the game was definitely a success.

    This kind of extended advertising well before launch can be very effective and doesn't even have to cost much. All they really need do is get out there and get involved in interviews and post gameplay footage snippets on their own site or YouTube. For the most part though, advanced pre advertising is not only unnecessary, it can also reveal too many secrets to competing teams.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
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  9. lemonadesoda

    lemonadesoda

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    For single player, that might be. But for multiplayer, you want to have servers up and running and ready to join as soon as you buy the game. That requires enthusiasts to set up their servers before release... they need a near-ready demo to do this.
     
  10. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    So should hardware manufacturers, auto manufacturers, etc. etc. never announce new products before they are generally available?
    If not, why should the game industry be held to a different standard?
     

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