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General sound question(s)

Discussion in 'Audio, Video & Home Theater' started by Dipshit, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. Dipshit New Member

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    Okay this is my first thread...Good night to you all. I am kind of sick of my Trust Cosmo. The sound quality is quite good for a €20 headset, the problem is that the mic doesn't work. It has never worked and never will. It came broken out of the box. Great. I really need a mic that works for Left 4 Dead 2, so I will be using it for gaming. I'm not asking you to tell me what to buy, because then I'd still not know anything. I just want to learn how to read sound cards, how to know which headset fits with what sound card best and why, etc. So that one day, I may even help out someone else who is in the same situation as I am right now.

    I've tried to do my research, but for every direct answer I find on Google, there is a direct attack on that opinion on another website. Some say that USB headsets have sound cards built-in that are specifically designed for that headset, implying that USB headsets are a really good option. Others say that USB headsets are built very cheaply and are but a slightly noticeable improvement over onboard. I don't know what to believe. Are USB headsets/phones a good way to go? I'm on a desktop PC using onboard Realtek ALC892, Windows 7 x64. Also I don't want to be a bother to any one of you so if I'm asking too much I can of course delete this thread and leave you at peace.
     
  2. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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  3. Frederik S Staff

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    Any regular on-board sound card will sound better than a USB one. USB is a horrible power source and due to the power envelope and size criteria all of the USB headsets generally sound horrible.

    The USB sound cards integrated with the headsets use basically the same decoders and chips but are built from low power versions and the amplification circuits are severely handicapped by the 5V 100mw USB power limit.
     
  4. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    isnt it 5V/0.5A, so 2.5W max for USB ports?


    even the low powered stuff is 300ma/500ma, or so i thought
     
  5. Suhidu

    Suhidu

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    Mussels is right, USB 2.0 max is 2.5W(provided it's a high-power usb port).

    USB is at 5V:
    • Low-Power provides for: 100mA max.
    • High-Power provides for: 500mA max(2.0) / 900mA max(3.0). (Ensure you use a powered port for these devices.)
    (See attachment)


    So, since the spec(scroll down) (AND WIKIPEDIA AGREES WITH THEM!!) designates two classes of device, Suhidu knows how Frederik got confused.
     

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  6. Frederik S Staff

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    As far as I know non of the regular USB headsets are designed for high power USB. The ones I have had were all 100mA according to the label on the amplifier box.

    The issue is mostly that no quality audio components can run off 5V, most are designed for 18 - 24V operation. And that USB power is badly conditioned in terms of noise.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2012
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