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GRISOFT Launches Free AVG Anti-Rootkit

Discussion in 'News' started by Jimmy 2004, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. Jimmy 2004

    Jimmy 2004 New Member

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    Popular free antivirus provider GRISOFT has today launched the first non-beta version of its AVG Anti-Rootkit software, which is free to all home users. Unfortunately GRISOFT does not offer support for this new product so you’ll have to rely on their forums if you run into any problems, but you should certainly consider adding this software to your PC security arsenal. Rootkits are among the newest and most difficult to detect forms of malware being circulated at present, and most standard virus scanners will have either no rootkit detecting abilities or be very limited in their effectiveness, so at present the best way to combat them is by using these standalone rootkit-detectors. Other free anti-rootkit software to look at includes RootkitRevealer, Rootkit Unhooker, Rootkit Buster, IceSword and Sophos Anti-Rootkit, although some are difficult to use and may not remove the rootkits for you - as rootkits are still relatively new and different software will be better at detecting different exploits, it is a good idea to use multiple scanners to complement each other. AVG Anti-Rootkit will work on the 32-bit versions of both Windows 2000 and Windows XP, although Windows Vista support is not mentioned.

    Source: GRISOFT
  2. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    grisoft is my hero!
  3. jurrasstoil New Member

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    Just out of curiosity:
    can someone explain in a few words what these "rootkits" do?
  4. Jimmy 2004

    Jimmy 2004 New Member

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    I'm not an expert on what they do/how they work, but the basic idea behind them is that the rootkit will hide the malware (which could do whatever any normal virus does) so that it is very difficult to detect - the virus can be running in the background without the user having any idea, which is why these rootkit scanners are good. Wikipedia probably can explain it better than me.
  5. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    Yep Wikki... :)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rootkit

    "From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    A rootkit is a set of software tools intended to conceal running processes, files or system data from the operating system. Rootkits have their origin in relatively benign applications, but in recent years have been used increasingly by malware to help intruders maintain access to systems while avoiding detection. Rootkits exist for a variety of operating systems, such as Linux, Solaris and versions of Microsoft Windows. Rootkits often modify parts of the operating system or install themselves as drivers or kernel modules.

    The word "rootkit" came to general public awareness in the 2005 Sony BMG CD copy protection scandal, in which Sony BMG music CDs surreptitiously placed a rootkit on Microsoft Windows PCs when the CD was played on the computer. Sony provided no mention of this on the CD or its packaging, referring only to security rights management measures."


    "A rootkit can take full control of a system. A rootkit's only purpose is to hide files, network connections, memory addresses, or registry entries from other programs used by system administrators to detect intended/ unintended special privilege accesses to the computer resources. However, a rootkit may be incorporated with other files which have other purposes. It is important to note that the utilities bundled with the rootkit may be malicious in intent, but a rootkit is essentially a technology; it may be used for both productive and destructive purposes.

    A rootkit is often used to hide utilities. These are often used to abuse a compromised system, include so-called "backdoors" to help the attacker subsequently access the system more easily. For example, the rootkit may hide an application that spawns a shell when the attacker connects to a particular network port on the system. Kernel rootkits may include similar functionality. A backdoor may also allow processes started by a non-privileged user to execute functions normally reserved for the superuser."
  6. Jimmy 2004

    Jimmy 2004 New Member

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    Good old Sony, they know how to get consumers to like them :rolleyes:

    They've lost me as a Playstation fan, but I am buying a new Hi-Fi from them so I haven't learned yet... I'm sure it will explode and teach me a lesson!
  7. WarEagleAU

    WarEagleAU Bird of Prey

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    Yeah, Sony got smacked really really hard with that one. Damn rootkit software.

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