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Hard Drives= Number 1 Failing Component?

Discussion in 'Storage' started by flashstar, Oct 9, 2012.

  1. STCNE

    STCNE New Member

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    ASUS? :p
     
  2. cdawall where the hell are my stars

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    Asus, Gigabyte, MSI, ECS, Asrock, the list goes on. :laugh:
     
  3. D007

    D007

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    I know I have experienced hard drive failure within that limit twice.. I've only been building pc's since I joined TPU.. 2 Failures since 2007.. They are garbage I guess. I just thought I always screwed something up..

    But I guess the greatest trick the devil ever pulled, was convincing the wolrd he didn't exist..
    Kind of like how HD manufacturers convinced us it was our fault or "extremely" unlikley to fail within that time..
    Better start backing up more often..lol..
     
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  4. Cruise51

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    No. Only had one hard drive fail. Though I've had a crap load of motherboards die. Power supplies are the worst since they tend to invite other parts over for a group suicide. :cry:
     
  5. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    Yeah, but you probably push the boards too, 90% of the computer population run pre-builts with no way to push components beyond their specs.

    Though there are a lot of shit boards out there in pre-builts with popped caps from the Pentium 4 era, Dells seem to be the worst.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2012
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  6. nt300

    nt300

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    What I find irritating is Seagate and WD both reduces the warranty period due to a larger number of hard driver failures. Should this be the other way around? Take care of your customers. This tell s me that they are no longer confident about their own products they sell.
     
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  7. Chevalr1c

    Chevalr1c

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    ^That may be a sign that they try to prepare for and adapt to changes in the storage market.
     
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  8. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    A reduction in warranty period doesn't mean a reduction in product quality, reducing the warranty period is a cost saving measure. When they figure the cost on a drive they include a certain margin to cover the small number of warranty replacements for that model. Reducing the warranty length reduces the amount of margin that is set aside and lowers the cost of the drive.
     
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  9. St.Alia-Of-The-Knife New Member

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    Ive never had an hdd going bad on me before, guess i might expect it soon...
     
  10. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    this only makes sense. First off in my experience laptop drives will be the first to go. I mean its not like desktops fall off your lap everyday. Secondly this type of thing can be said about almost any component machanical or not. I have a via pci card i use for testing. iv dropped it knocked it off my table set boxes on it and it hasent failed me yet. But current cards failure rates are much higher. it makes sense to me that a 320mb drive from 1989 still works when a 3TB seagate fails after getting too hot. as technology and performance improve the fault tolerence from what iv seen goes down. its all more fragile. Saying companies are screwing customers are that they are making the drives moe failure prown is non-sense and misinforming new members. thats like saying

    this
    [​IMG]

    should have the same failure rate as

    this
    [​IMG]

    doesnt make sense.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2012
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  11. [XC] Oj101

    [XC] Oj101

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    I would imagine so. The ideal temperature for a hard drive would be a fine balance between cool enough to last and warm enough for the lubricant to be close to its maximum viscosity. I remember reading years ago that 45'c to 55'c is the ideal range for maximizing life out of a drive.
     
  12. Jetster

    Jetster

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    This is why I change mine every 3 years
     
  13. cdawall where the hell are my stars

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    Most of them died when volts were a smidge high...
     
  14. Widjaja

    Widjaja

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    Dust seems to be the number one culprit of the failed HDDs in my experience.
    Secondly PSU.
    Thirdly dropped laptop while HDD is spinning.

    The only time I have had HDDs fail of my own are due to dropping them and plugging them into a faulty USB bay.
     
  15. johnspack

    johnspack

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    I deal with a lot of old systems I either have to repair, or inherit to scrounge parts out of so I can keep repairing old systems. I have what I call a "dead drive stack"... typically upto 10 hds I had to pull out of systems because they are dead. I find it's the 1gb+ drives that end up there most. Older drives seem to keep running forever. I still have a 40mb mfm seagate that still works.
     

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