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Heat Key To Faster HDDs...Hundreds of Times Faster

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. TurdFergasun New Member

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    so they're going to make new HD's into something similar sony's minidisc recorder? meh if it works, and doesn't break i'm all for it.
  2. 1freedude

    1freedude

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    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  3. m1dg3t

    m1dg3t

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    I aint talkin' sub ambient, not like i'm gonna go out and get a couple Tech9 pot's for my HDD's :roll: My HDD's run between 33c - 40c well within spec's, never lost a drive in 10yrs :)
  4. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    get them up to 900C and gimme speed tests



    and nothing that i know of proved cooler temps killed drive (except sub ambient) - the only thing i know of proven there, was that normal temps (say, 40-60C) cause no problems. if drives were gunna fail, they just fail. temps only speed it up (and this was posted by google buying and using entire batches of drives)
  5. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Higher density most likely. HDDs are faster today than they were 10 years ago despite staying at 7200 RPM because more data passes under the head every rotation. If you increase the density by 100 times, you're likely to see a 100 times increase in read/write performance as well.


    800C sounds a tad bit dangerous (not to mention power consuming) for consumer hardware though. If that's the temp of the laser and it only brings, say, 3 atoms thick of platter up to maybe 200C--it wouldn't take long at all for that to cool back down to ambient (milliseconds likely).
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2012
    Crunching for Team TPU
  6. faramir New Member

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    This sounds like re-discovery of writing process of magneto-optical drives from the 80s and 90s.

    Those things used laser to heat up the recording area and store data magnetically. The difference seems to be in the way data is read out.
    MikeMurphy says thanks.
  7. THE_EGG

    THE_EGG

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    So does that mean that if I take one of these HDD's apart I can use its laser as a spot welder ? :p
  8. ypsylon

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    Yeap, very similar to MO. Used a lot MO. Unfortunately MO became simply obsolete because disk size never moved past 5.2GB. Would love to see MO/HDD back. SSDs are road to nowhere. Low reliability (MO beats SSD into oblivion), low capacity, insane price.
  9. MikeMurphy

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    Fix the random access on magnetic drives and you've addressed the main issue. I don't know why they still use a moving arm. Other options exist.
  10. faramir New Member

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    The first company to "invent" arms with multiple R/W heads on the same shaft is going to make lots of money ... more heads in parallel on the same platter means proportionally more throughput. Eventually the HDDs will turn into something similar to "line printers" of the old :)
  11. Steevo

    Steevo

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    http://static.googleusercontent.com...ch.google.com/en/us/archive/disk_failures.pdf

    35-40C is optimal temperature for disk life of 3 or less years, however if it won't fail in the third year it will likely last to at least five.
    10 Million points folded for TPU
  12. Static~Charge

    Static~Charge

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    Yes, but only for very small spots....
  13. THE_EGG

    THE_EGG

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    hazah! :D
  14. m1dg3t

    m1dg3t

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    Last edited: Feb 8, 2012
  15. Mega-Japan

    Mega-Japan

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    LOL
    Oven would melt it. Me thinks microwave would have better results. Me thinks xD.
  16. hellrazor

    hellrazor

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    Fire is good for hard drives, and that's a fact.
  17. Yo_Wattup New Member

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    Low reliability? Whatchu smokin?

    Microwaves react with electro magnetic devices. You seen a CD in a microwave? Youtube it. Then tell me its a good idea to put your HDD in... :roll:
  18. THE_EGG

    THE_EGG

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    i think mega-japan was being sarcastic lol.

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