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How can I protect a folder with a password?

Discussion in 'Linux / BSD / Mac OS X' started by chikiwighi, Jan 23, 2010.

  1. chikiwighi New Member

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    I need to password-protect my directories, because I don't want my boss to see everything I save or download. He obviously knows the 'root' password and I'm not that familiar with Linux, so I don't know how to "hide" some of my directories from him.
    Thanks
     
  2. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    Encrypt the folder/files with a password.
    However, if this is a company owned machine you may be legally obligated to give them those passwords.
     
  3. buffy

    buffy New Member

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    However if you have forgotten the password, not much anyone can do.
     
    Nailezs says thanks.
  4. Nailezs

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    :laugh: I got a good little chuckle off that
     
  5. Easy Rhino

    Easy Rhino Linux Advocate

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    is this a linux based OS ?
     
  6. regexorcist

    regexorcist New Member

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    Yes assuming a Linux system, you could use
    GNU Privacy Guard
    http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/linux-how-to-encrypt-and-decrypt-files-with-a-password.html

    or you could be creative, and use names that indicate configuration files
    and put a dot at the beginning of each name. It's likely the powers that be
    would never even notice.
    (names and extensions mean nothing in linux and the "." dot at the begining
    indicates a local configuration type file normally hidden unless one uses
    the -a with ls (ls -a) or in a gui file manager <ctrl -H> or menu option.
    Even so, it's unlikely one would dive into a .mozilla or .opera directory.

    be creative... :cool:
     

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