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How did my 980x's default speed change into just 2.66ghz instead of 3.33ghz?

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by vziera, Jul 15, 2014.

  1. vziera

    vziera

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    Woah, yay! finally a fellow countrymen, just sent you a PM, thanks a lot for swinging by my thread :D

    Yeah fire sparks and sorta low electrical shocks. I already had the electrical checking scheduled this week but sadly it won't be performed by a friend, but rather some paid professional, I just got no such friends:(

    thank you everyone.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2014
  2. silkstone

    silkstone

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    These electrical problems are common throughout S.E. Asia, I think it's called a floating neutral where the neutral wire is grounded too far away from the home.

    I don't think there's anything you can do apart from to ground your house, and even then, you can't buy 3-prong plugs to use with your equipment.

    My house supply has a floating neutral + static ground, I'm not sure if this arrangement is safe so would be interested to know. However, I don't experience shocks when touching my electrical equipment any more.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2014
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  3. Vario

    Vario

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    Could you ground to a pipe or sink a large metal rod and then ground to it?
     
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  4. vziera

    vziera

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    Just what I thought, some friends claimed to have their house well grounded but when I visited some of them at their home I found out that their metal electronics tickled still but that was a lot better than at my home, here the shocks feel more like a bite and it hurts. thanks for confirming.

    The location of my PC is way to far from my garden but I will definitely look into it

    Thanks everyone!
     
  5. silkstone

    silkstone

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    Wait till you hear what the electrician says. There could be more serious issues behind what is going on.

    If you want to ground, the PC, the safest way is to ground your house circuit. Having multiple floating grounds can also be dangerous, I think.
     
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  6. eidairaman1

    eidairaman1

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    Needs to be 8 ft long
     
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  7. bencrutz

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    check your inbox bro :cool:

    it's a TT system in the distribution network, pretty much like in japan.
    neutral is grounded at the distribution transformer, and at the service entrance (power meter) there should be local grounding/earthing.
    the problem is, local grounding/earthing is usually neglected here, when people building their homes/buildings. my guess is, either the OP don't have a local grounding, or the socket outlet is not connected to the local grounding (contractors trying to save some money and cuts a corner).
     
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  8. silkstone

    silkstone

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    That sounds right. My apartment has TT earthing with an 30 mA RCM on the outlets and water heaters. However 3 prong plugs are impossible to find here, so nothing is grounded. The neutral's ground reference is far from the local ground leading to shocks. The shocks can get quite big, but not above 30 mA (if they were, the RCB would trip)
     
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  9. vziera

    vziera

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    I learnt a lot about electricty from you guys, damn just now I found electricity to be a very interesting thing to learn. I hope it's not too late, thanks to you, guys!

    As for the progress, there is nothing new but rather a regress, the distributor of my PSU turned out to be out of business which means...

    F**k my life...

    anyway, I won't give up and will try hard to get back with an update, a positive one.

    Thanks everyone.
     
  10. silkstone

    silkstone

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    Contact the manufacturer. They'll help - USA support is usually the best.
     
  11. vziera

    vziera

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    No response from either thermaltake USA and Asia yet, how terrible life is.
     
  12. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    Are brownouts common in your area? If your machine wasn't protected in the first place is it possible that dirty power is what messed it up in the first place? In which case, before you do anything, you should purchase a half-decent UPS to protect you from such events.
     
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  13. silkstone

    silkstone

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    The PSU will usually compensate for brownouts, i think they can operate from 100 V ~ 280 V. I've had a couple that have died from the power spikes when the electricity resumes, however. I think it's the over-volting of components that leads to wear.

    To the OP, send another e-mail and also look if they have a tech-support number, Skype credit is fairly cheap.
     
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  14. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    You're under exaggerating the issues that can be caused by brownouts.

    SuperUser has a great explanation that none of us have to recreate:

     
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  15. silkstone

    silkstone

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    I'm not sure if that information talks about automatically switching power supplies though. That is the ATX standard, most branded PSUs exceed this by quite a lot. You've have to check the spec sheet for that particular PSU.

    I believe most modern ones are switching and there is crossover between the highest voltage when running at 110 V and lowest at 220 V. In effect, there is a large operativg voltage range when running a switching power supply, you don't have to worry about the 110 or 220 +/- 10% it's actually 110 to 220 V +/- 10%

    Edit - the TT unit the op has specifies this: Input Voltage100 VAC- 240 VAC.

    From what I've read, going too far below 100 V is a no-no, but otherwise, damage is unlikely. Maybe someone with more knowledge could chime in.

    Edit 2: I found the link you got that from, and the second explanation on there is much more detailed.

    http://superuser.com/questions/113113/why-are-brownouts-so-harmful

    Edit 3 - Your advice is spot on though, a UPS will protect against dirty power.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2014
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  16. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    RIght, but as I understand it, it is up to the motherboard is deassert Power On when the PSU deasserts power good. If the motherboard doesn't do that, the PSU will stay on regardless of input voltage and might deliver lower voltages if it drops below 100v. That's what I was getting at. It could be a great PSU, but if the motherboard keeps the PSU on when power good goes low, then it's just in a bad state. It's not the PSU that gets damaged, it's the components that get supplied the lower voltage.
     
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  17. silkstone

    silkstone

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    No the PSU should power down if the voltage dips below nominal for too long this is related to the protection element that stop the DC voltage dipping too low on the output end. The motherboard doesn't send the off signal. Basically, the PSU will continue to try to output 12 VDC until it can no longer do so and it then shuts down.

    One of the reasons that brownouts can be so dangerous (for the PSU) when they dip below 90 V is that the PSU will continue to try outputting 12 VDC. The power usage goes up as does the heat, and the efficiency goes out the window.

    In the US, you do have to worry about brownouts and have generally lower efficiency. Outside of the US, you get better efficiency, but spikes are an issue and household electricity is more dangerous.

    Brownouts can happen elsewhere in the world, but they are typically short lived and don't last much longer than would happen when power-cycling your PC. Spikes happen all the time where I live, I notice them more often now when the lights flash briefly and my UPS beeps.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2014
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  18. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    Over the last year, my UPS has had 5 events that have required it to switch to battery. That's not too bad, but it's also 5 events that didn't impact my tower either. :)
     
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  19. vziera

    vziera

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    I'll sure be damned and crazy if other components would turn out affected as well. I do use a UPS but that time I forgot to plug the PC back in the UPS and yes brownouts and brief electronic flickerings are very often in here. When I play graphic intensive games like skyrim, crysis, etc, my UPS always fail to keep my PC running lately, but not when I play lower graphic games like minecraft, team fortress, dota, etc. Also I've had my UPS maintained couple months ago. I'm even useing two surge protectors for both protections and extra slots. I will check TT's phone number, thank you everyone.
     
  20. silkstone

    silkstone

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    UPS maintained? AFAIK you usually have to thrown them away unless they are higher end models with replaceable batteries.

    I've actually seen lots of arguments against using UPS to protect from spikes and brownouts, the approximated waveform can be damaging in of itself apparently. I wouldn't go without one though, it has saved my work countless times, and mechanical hard-disks die quite quickly with sudden power loss.

    I have a few events each week where my UPS has to kick in, that's how crappy the grid is here.
     
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  21. vziera

    vziera

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    Yeah, had it serviced few months ago including battery replacement and yes the battery is replaceable and it is a sinewave line interactive(offline) so it should be PFC PSU friendly.

    I can only hope things will be beautiful with all of us eventually. Thank you everyone.
     
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