1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

How Easy is it to Move Components to a New Case?

Discussion in 'System Builder's Advice' started by The_Edster, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. The_Edster

    The_Edster

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2013
    Messages:
    54 (0.27/day)
    Thanks Received:
    6
    I have been debating changing my PC case to a Corsair 650D for better airflow and a general nicer case, but I don't know how easy is it to move the components. I haven't done anything like this before and I am thinking the hardest part is changing the watercooling on my cpu and moving the motherboard, help?
  2. buildzoid

    buildzoid

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,084 (1.74/day)
    Thanks Received:
    292
    Location:
    CZ
    You do what you did to build your computer in reverse and then take the components and install them in the other case.
    Vario says thanks.
  3. night.fox

    night.fox

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2012
    Messages:
    801 (1.41/day)
    Thanks Received:
    383
    Location:
    south korea
    watercooling on your cpu. is it AIO? if its AIO, just make sure you have a new tim.... its better to use new time than old tim....

    generally, depends on your skills. I have switch to new case few months ago and I tell you, i really enjoy it. There are some challenges of course but I like to rebuild it...... i even have to redo it before cause after I put components into new case, everything is ready... when I connect the cables, i found out WTF! I forgot mobo IO shield... lol.... so I have to redo it again........

    well lesson learned but I really enjoy it... thats me.. oh and one piece of advice, take your time, dont rush.... if you rush rebuilding it, you might end up redoing everything. and do it when you know you have alot of time to do it. not only a few minutes or 1 hour.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  4. micropage7

    micropage7

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Messages:
    5,565 (3.54/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,272
    Location:
    Jakarta, Indonesia
    why dont you try all in one water cooling, you dont need to sweat much
    just installing the rad, place retention and replace the cooler
    recheck and turn it on
    just always recheck and make sure everythings alright before turn it on
    one more: always read the manual first
  5. night.fox

    night.fox

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2012
    Messages:
    801 (1.41/day)
    Thanks Received:
    383
    Location:
    south korea

    well he has corsair H60. last time i check that is AIO :p :peace:
    Crunching for Team TPU
  6. micropage7

    micropage7

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Messages:
    5,565 (3.54/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,272
    Location:
    Jakarta, Indonesia
  7. The_Edster

    The_Edster

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2013
    Messages:
    54 (0.27/day)
    Thanks Received:
    6
    I am very confused, what is an AIO cooler? Sorry I am a big noob at this.. :/
  8. buildzoid

    buildzoid

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,084 (1.74/day)
    Thanks Received:
    292
    Location:
    CZ
    Any water cooler that doesn't require you to connect the parts yourself. The H60 is one.
    The_Edster says thanks.
  9. de.das.dude

    de.das.dude Pro Indian Modder

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    7,477 (5.01/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,937
    should be good. just keep your senses on alert and dont yank at anything other than power cables. :p
  10. Kursah

    Kursah

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    Messages:
    7,598 (2.68/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,569
    Location:
    Missoula, MT, USA
    It's all screws and zip ties imho. Screws to hold the 10-piece jig-saw that's your PC together, which is the easy part imho. Though I've built dozens of PC's.

    The rest for me imho is cable management, and each case and PSU cable setup is different, so having zip ties and side cutters is a recommended thing. As suggested above don't yank on cables. If you need take pictures of each step coming out and reverse going back in. Swapping PC components is a very easy process, might be nerve wracking the first time, but it'll get much easier after that! Enjoy!

    :toast:
  11. Vario

    Vario

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2005
    Messages:
    2,748 (0.86/day)
    Thanks Received:
    855
    Its not very hard if you built the computer yourself. If you had someone else build it its more work for a first timer. I have built many computers for years now so its become pretty fast I think I would do it in this order:

    1) Unplug the power wires and any other wires. Don't pull too hard but the 8 pin and 24 pin power wires (google for images of these if you need to) are harder to pull out sometimes
    2) Unscrew the graphics card's screws then pull it out, unclipping the PCI-E slot's retainer
    3) disconnect the H60's radiator and fan from the case
    4) unscrew the screws that hold the motherboard to the case.
    5) remove the standoffs
    6) remove the I/O panel (the backplate with the plug colors etc for the mobo)
    7) remove the power supply
    8) install I/O panel into new case
    9) install standoofs
    10) install mobo
    11) install the h60's fan into the 120mm fan spot on the back
    12) reinstall the graphics card
    13) install power supply and connections (pcie power wires for the gpu, the 8 pin cpu wire (usually runs up behind the motherboard's tray and over the top to the plug up there) and the 24 pin (usually runs out the back and up and out at an angle into the leading edge)
    14) swap your harddrives and other peripherals over and connect the power and sata cables.
    15) connect your case's power on and reset and audio headers to the mobo

    You won't have to reinstall the CPU or TIM or any of that. The ram can stay installed. Just be gentle with the hosing and radiator when you pull it all out attached.
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2013
  12. thebluebumblebee

    thebluebumblebee

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Messages:
    2,864 (1.30/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,411
    (others posted while I was composing this)
    There are many videos on Youtube about building a computer. Start there. Watch those until you understand why everything is connected where it is.
    Make sure you take ESD precautions!!!!! Don't force anything! The 24 pin power connector will require the most force-just make sure you are pressing the release clip while trying to remove it.
    To me, and I have been building computers since the 386 days, the hardest part is the front panel connections. The second hardest is getting the motherboard in the case and lined up with the I/O shield. This is really a mechanical job. If you are at all mechanically inclined, it's not hard. Taking pictures is a good idea. A video camera would be even better. Don't mix up the SATA cables between the optical drive, SSD and HDD. (I leave the SATA cables connected to the motherboard) The power and data connections on drives are fragile.
    I don't think you will gain much with this-I think you will be disappointed unless this is more about aesthetics and less about cooling.
    If you decide to do this, don't remove the AIO from the motherboard. Just be careful, (a second set of hands would be good) while the system is laying with the motherboard flat, remove the screws from the motherboard, verify that it is loose and all other connections to it have been removed, unscrew the radiator from the case and (gently) lay it on the motherboard. Then move the motherboard and AIO to a prepared surface, like the anti-static bag the motherboard came in, remove the I/O shield from the old case (carefully, they bend easily) install in the new case. then move the motherboard/AIO into the new case.
    It sounds like this system was built for you. Do you have the option of having them swap cases for you? I would guess that most shops would charge about an hour labor.

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page