1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

How should I install this ceiling mount?

Discussion in 'Audio, Video & Home Theater' started by twilyth, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. twilyth Guest

    I have this Telehook mount that I'm initially going to use with a 42" LCD.

    My problem is that it has a circular mounting bracket that is wider than the beams (joists) that I can attach it to.

    So I'm try to figure the best way around this. The beams are 2x12's that are 12" on center. So I'm thinking about cutting 2 10" pieces of 4x4 and using 4" screws to bridge 2 of the beams. Then I'll bolt the bracket into the 4x4's.

    Any other ideas?
     
  2. erocker

    erocker Super Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Messages:
    39,892 (13.08/day)
    Thanks Received:
    14,295
    Your idea of doing it is the same way I would do it.
     
  3. Sinzia

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Messages:
    847 (0.56/day)
    Thanks Received:
    209
    I've done stuff like that before, never had an issue with a 47 or a 55 display
     
  4. techguy31

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Messages:
    500 (0.30/day)
    Thanks Received:
    38
    I'd highly suggest that if you have an attic that leads to where you are going to hang that mount place two 1/2" wood boards separetely both side of your beam so that it will lock in better. I'd highly suggest you do that; I did it makes for a better piece of mind.:rolleyes:
     
  5. Steevo

    Steevo

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2005
    Messages:
    8,431 (2.55/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,253
    Open or covered beams?

    Open beams running 90 deg the other direction use a 2 X 8 and hang it with three screws 3" in length screwed into the bottom edge of the 2 X 12's, if they are covered do the same.


    4" screws into a 4 X 4 block could cause splitting and will look like ass. A nice piece of matching wood screwed to the bottom edge will cause less damage and a 2 X 8 will be less prone to splitting.
     
    10 Million points folded for TPU
  6. twilyth Guest

    I forgot to mention that the beams are covered with drywall, so I'll be working blind whichever approach I use. I can get pretty close using some "landmarks" and some basic measurements, but I need some room for error.

    also, I have a stud finder that measures density (as opposed to the kind that just looks for nails). So with that, I can probably get to within 1/2" of my target.
    This is the other approach I was thinking about except that the distance across the bracket, from hole to hole is about 3". So I can attach a couple of 2x4's to the beam and then sink one each of the mounting screws into the 2x4's and the other 2 into the beam. Except in that case, I'm worried about splitting the 2x4's.

    I would use very thin wood screws with a torx head for the 4x4's. I've used these in studs without pilot holes with very good results and no splitting. Also, I sink them at a downward angle so I'd be going across the grain.

    Another thing that was bothering me was the screws the mount comes with. These are huge lag bolts that are better suited to masonry than wood. I've used something similar on my beams and they worked but I had to hit the beam dead center. I don't really want to chance that this time around so I'm thinking of longer but thinner screws with washers if necessary rather than the screws it comes with.
     
  7. Jetster

    Jetster

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    5,238 (2.96/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2,167
    Location:
    Oregon
    2 - 2X4 blocks flat between the joists would do fine. No need to use 4x4s Install threw the attic
    Place a 4"metal outlet box between the 2X4 screwed into the 2X4 and joist. Hanging the thickness of the drywall below the joist. The mount attaches to the metal box with screws and the wires go threw the box. This would be the correct way. You should only have to cut a 4X4 hole in the drywall. It all installs from the attic. If there is not attic access then your cutting a bigger hole
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
  8. techguy31

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Messages:
    500 (0.30/day)
    Thanks Received:
    38
    I don't know if you would do this but this is a clever idea (well I think) that might work for you. If you know the exact beam that you are going to puncture. Then you should start from the attic by using a super thin drill bit just to puncture the beam from the attic to the ceiling of the dry wall. Of course, this method would mean that you would not know exactly where it will come out from the ceiling, but you would know that it is exactly in the middle of the beam. Then you could go back down to where you are going to drill the screws and use the already marked hole as where you will drill.
     
  9. twilyth Guest

    The mount has cable management via the interior of the telescoping tubes. I just need power and HDMI - depending on what I connect to it. Running the cables into the attic would mean finding a way to snake them back into the livingroom since that's where the console and other input devices will be. Although the idea of using an electrical box is ingenious. :toast:
    The beams are 12" deep but I could drill small holes on either side. However the Zircon density sensor I have is pretty precise. In the past I've always been able to find the exact center of a beam or stud - even when it was covered with both drywall and wood paneling.

    What do you guys think about substituting thinner mounting screws for the lag screws/bolts that come with the mount? The screws I have are about 3/8" across (thread ridge to ridge), maybe a bit more. If I use those, I'd probably lean toward using the 4x4's with 3/16th to 1/4" pilot holes - I'd sink 2 screws per 4x4. I'd attach the 4x4's to beams using cross angled scews - 2 on an angle from the 4x4 to the beam and 2 from the beam to the 4x4.
     
  10. MT Alex

    MT Alex

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2009
    Messages:
    3,804 (1.96/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,640
    You are seriously over thinking all of this. The maximum load the mount is rated for is 55 pounds, which could be held by a single screw of the torx variety you mentioned earlier. The 4x4s would look goofy, and are unnecessary.

    Steevo has the best plan with the 2x8, as your bracket plate is 6" wide, the 2x8 is 7 1/4" wide, giving you a 5/8" reveal on the sides. If you want more, use a 2x10, which measures 9 1/4". Cut it 15" long, champher the edges so they don't look so crappy, put three 3 1/2" torx heads into each joist. Done. Even though they are retarded, I'd use the lags that came with the package just for liability sake. Predrill 1/4" holes like they say and use a ratchet.

    If you can get in the attic, cut 2 2x10s 10 7/16" long, take them up there with a cordless screw gun, lay flat on the drywall, and put 4 screws through the 2x12s into the end grain of your 2x10 blocks on each side. Done. Can't see it from below. Simple as that.
     
  11. twilyth Guest

    I tried to explain this before but I guess I didn't do a very good job. The beams are covered with drywall and I see no reason to start cutting away any drywall.

    So while 4x4's would be overkill, it doesn't matter since you won't ever see them. The only consideration is easy of installation and structural integrity.

    Also, I don't think you understand how huge the lag bolts are, so here is a picture with a quarter to give you an idea of scale.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. MT Alex

    MT Alex

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2009
    Messages:
    3,804 (1.96/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,640
    Yeah, I know how big they are, use them all the time. I don't think I talked about cutting drywall, but I don't think I understood you. I think you were doing what I was talking about in option 2. You are going to put the 4x4s in the attic? I thought you were going to toe screw them from the bottom, on the outside of the drywall.:laugh:
     

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page