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How to detect a short circuit in my rig ??

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by Valenciente, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. Valenciente

    Valenciente

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    'Ey guys,

    So around a month ago, my PSU went haywire, and I RMA'ed it to OCZ in The Netherlands.
    Today, I just got a brand new OCZ EliteXStream 800W through the door, but I'm a bit afraid of plugging it into my rig, as I don't really want it to get fried again.. A month on 5 year old system with 256mb ram is more than enough for me...

    So are there any way to test my rig for any kind of short circuits, or should I just put the PSU in, and hope that the previous PSU was just unlucky?

    It was the exact same PSU, and it was around 2-3 months old when it died.

    Please help me out here guys ^.^

    You can see the specs of my rig at the spec thingie =P

    <---- That way somewhere

    -Valen :banghead:
     
  2. Jmatt110

    Jmatt110 New Member

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    Check your case and mobo to see if anything is touching anything it shouldn't. If not, just plug it in. Also, make sure you have a surge protector between your wall socket and the power supply, that may be what killed the old one.
     
  3. robal

    robal

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    Hi,

    All hi-spec PSUs are resistant to short circuiting.
    They will simply make emergency shut down is case of too high temperature or to high current draw.

    I think that your previous PSU just died itself.



    There's no good way to check for short circuits (apart from visual examination of PCB).
    Any electrical methods will fail, because the turned off mobo is essentially a short circuit (because of all the capacitors).

    Just for your own comfort:
    Try vacuuming gently your mobo and case before pluggin new PSU to make sure that you don't have any metal scraps lying around.

    Cheers
     
  4. Jmatt110

    Jmatt110 New Member

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    Yea true but it's better to be safe than sorry :p Does Europe use a 110v power grid?
     
  5. MRCL

    MRCL

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    Jmatt

    220v
     
  6. Jmatt110

    Jmatt110 New Member

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    Fair enough, must of been thinking of somewhere else then lol
     
  7. Wshlist

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    Two things, votage in the netherlands is 230 volt 50Hz since many years (used to be 220 but was brought in line with EU standards long ago), and secondly it's not california and there are no spikes there, rare as hen's teeth to have a spike in the netherlands (that they have underground cabling except for the very long distance stuff helps that along)

    I certainly get the concern though, I have a system which I shortcircuited once and after eight or nine months the PSU that was having some odd behaviour already all that time finally fried completely, looked inside and there were 2 bad capacitors, one looked like it had extra cheese on top from broiling, then when I put a new psu in I was worried I might have created some short on the mobo that slowly destroys it.

    Little factoid:
    "Following voltage harmonization all electricity supply within the European Union is now nominally 230 V ± 10% at 50 Hz. For a transition period (1995–2008), countries who previously used 220 V will use a narrower asymmetric tolerance range of 230 V +6% −10% and those (like the UK) who previously used 240 V use now 230 V +10% −6%"

    source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity
     
  8. Valenciente

    Valenciente

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    Thanks for your responses guys =) I tried plugging it in as there where no visual errors anywhere inside, and it's working nicely ^.^ Bought me a surge protector now so now I should be shielded against any non-fixable "mother nature" errors xD
     

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