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I wish we would move from coaxial cable to cat7

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by hat, Jan 28, 2009.

  1. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    I wish that we would use cat7 cable instead of coaxial cable for our cable tv/internets/whatever else coaxial is used for. Cat7 cable is basically just a very shielded cat6 cable, and the spec of cat6 is 10Gb/s. The spec of cat5 is 100Mb/s. Cat7 should still be in a screw-in form, but with 8 pins instead of one. The cable should run on telephone lines like coaxial cable, and it should run into your house like regular coaxial cable. There should be a conversion station where there is the screw-in form of the cable on the wall somewhere, and on the other end is a whole bunch of slightly modified RJ45 slots (the actual wiring in cat6 and cat7 cable is slightly thicker than cat5, so they don't always fit nicely in the RJ45 plug) where you can just run CAT6 cable to wherever... tv, router, straight into the pc... cat7 should be only for outside use since it's shielded and more expensive than cat6. Cat6 is indoor use because it won't need to be shielded cause it's not a very long cable like the kind you would normally find outside.

    This would do away with cable modems, they are no longer nescessary to decode coaxial signal into something readable to computers. Router, switches etc would still thrive for networking purposes. We would be able to have much better tv, internets, and probably phone because cat7 carries way more bandwidth than coaxial cable.

    /probably bad idea for reasons which I'm sure to find out soon from users at tpu
    Crunching for Team TPU
  2. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

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    You know the distance limit right?

    Besides, in many countries (including here) they're putting fiber in the ground, far superior to CAT7.
  3. crtecha

    crtecha New Member

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    Researchers in November 2007 proved that it is "definitely possible" to transport 100 gigabits per second over 70 meters of CAT7 cable and they are now working on extending it to 100 m.[1] This technology may be available in early 2013.[2]

    via wikipedia
  4. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    Yeah I figured there would be a distacne limit...

    I have an uncle who used to be an electrician, and he used to install fiberoptic for wealthy people. Fiber's a bitch because it uses fiberglass, and it can't be bent too sharply or it breaks, and when you cut fiber cable, you have to examine it and look and see if there are any bad cracks, and cut it again to get a better result, and then if it cuts nice you have to polish it and all this other crap that just sucks about it. It's pretty unmanageable.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  5. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

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    It bends perfectly fine, you just can't make them yourself as easily as you can make a UTP cable. Though since end users won't be seeing them under normal circumstances this doesn't matter.
  6. crtecha

    crtecha New Member

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    yeah its not easy to cap fiber
  7. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    Maybe not right now, but what about 5 or 10 years from now? Now everyone knows what cat5 is. Not everyone can look at it and say "oh yeah that's cat5 100Mb/s ethernet wire, rj45 port) but everyone can probably recgonize it, at least when it's hooked up to a computer, and say "oh yeah that's the internet wire"
    Crunching for Team TPU
  8. 95Viper

    95Viper

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    στο άλφα έως ωμέγα
    Basically yes,but...

    Fiber is the easiest thing in the world. If you were making ends or patch cords, yep u might have to clean 'em, but that is about it. Most ends are factory made and are fusion spliced to the fiber. The fiberglass rods(one on each side of the fiber under the sheath)are called strength members and are mainly used in field applications to stop or reduce bending during placement. You open it, cleave it for a clean cut(break) , fuse it, and sleeve it. Then test and 98.9% of the time it falls in specs. The fiber is strong as steel when pulled (due to the fiber characteristics and strength members), snaps when folded, but will bend.

    And Verizon has gone to using Coax inside, instead of running Cat cable or multi.
    :)
  9. DanTheBanjoman Señor Moderator

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    What I was saying is, fiber goes to the door, inside the home it's UTP. Fiber is still far superior for longer distances, inside the home it offers no gain. Slim chance that will be different in 5 years. UTP will stretch till 10Gb at least which will probably be the standard in 10 years. (just look at how long it takes to move to gigabit, most people are still on fast ethernet.
  10. JC316

    JC316 Knows what makes you tick

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    Agreed. My dad has to run it sometimes. If bent too sharply it will break. Then you have to deal with making sure you have the right decibel level to properly transmit.

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