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IBM Research Determines Atomic Limits of Magnetic Memory

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Jan 16, 2012.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Punctuating 30 years of nanotechnology research, scientists from IBM Research (NYSE: IBM) have successfully demonstrated the ability to store information in as few as 12 magnetic atoms. This is significantly less than today’s disk drives, which use about one million atoms to store a single bit of information. The ability to manipulate matter by its most basic components – atom by atom – could lead to the vital understanding necessary to build smaller, faster and more energy-efficient devices.

    While silicon transistor technology has become cheaper, denser and more efficient, fundamental physical limitations suggest this path of conventional scaling is unsustainable. Alternative approaches are needed to continue the rapid pace of computing innovation.

    [​IMG]

    By taking a novel approach and beginning at the smallest unit of data storage, the atom, scientists demonstrated magnetic storage that is at least 100 times denser than today’s hard disk drives and solid state memory chips. Future applications of nanostructures built one atom at a time, and that apply an unconventional form of magnetism called antiferromagnetism, could allow people and businesses to store 100 times more information in the same space.

    “The chip industry will continue its pursuit of incremental scaling in semiconductor technology but, as components continue to shrink, the march continues to the inevitable end point: the atom. We’re taking the opposite approach and starting with the smallest unit -- single atoms -- to build computing devices one atom at a time.” said Andreas Heinrich, the lead investigator into atomic storage at IBM Research – Almaden, in California.
    The research was published today in the peer-reviewed journal Science.



    How it Works
    The most basic piece of information that a computer understands is a bit. Much like a light that can be switched on or off, a bit can have only one of two values: "1" or "0". Until now, it was unknown how many atoms it would take to build a reliable magnetic memory bit.

    With properties similar to those of magnets on a refrigerator, ferromagnets use a magnetic interaction between its constituent atoms that align all their spins – the origin of the atoms’ magnetism – in a single direction. Ferromagnets have worked well for magnetic data storage but a major obstacle for miniaturizing this down to atomic dimensions is the interaction of neighboring bits with each other. The magnetization of one magnetic bit can strongly affect that of its neighbor as a result of its magnetic field. Harnessing magnetic bits at the atomic scale to hold information or perform useful computing operations requires precise control of the interactions between the bits.

    The scientists at IBM Research used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to atomically engineer a grouping of twelve antiferromagnetically coupled atoms that stored a bit of data for hours at low temperatures. Taking advantage of their inherent alternating magnetic spin directions, they demonstrated the ability to pack adjacent magnetic bits much closer together than was previously possible. This greatly increased the magnetic storage density without disrupting the state of neighboring bits.

    Writing and reading a magnetic byte: this image shows a magnetic byte imaged 5 times in different magnetic states to store the ASCII code for each letter of the word THINK, a corporate mantra used by IBM since 1914. The team achieved this using 96 iron atoms − one bit was stored by 12 atoms and there are eight bits in each byte.
    IBM and Nanotechnology Leadership

    In the company's 100 year history, IBM has invested in scientific research to shape the future of computing. Today's announcement is a demonstration of the results garnered by IBM's world-leading scientists and the company's continual investment in and focus on exploratory research.

    IBM Research has long been a leader in studying the properties of materials important to the information technology industry. For more than fifty years, scientists at IBM Research have laid the foundation of scientific knowledge that will be important for the future of IT and sought out discoveries that can advance existing technologies.
    FordGT90Concept, Zubasa and Darkleoco say thanks.
  2. Zubasa

    Zubasa

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    So this tech = see you in 100 years?
  3. Drone

    Drone

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    This technology can be better applied to qubits not bits.
  4. Suhidu

    Suhidu

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    Interesting news.

    [​IMG]

    A few years ago, I did some reading on Scanning Tunneling Microscopes (STMs), and how they can detect and manipulate individual atoms. Linked below are two different locations at the source website of the images included in my post. The source has more fun images like the ones in my post, none related to arranging computer bits or any of that. (©IBM)

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    STM Image Gallery

    Bye now.


    [​IMG]

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    Last edited: Jan 16, 2012
  5. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    How is that?
  6. Drone

    Drone

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    I mean by changing and re-orienting magnetic moment maybe they could achieve not only 1 and 0 but also its superposition.
  7. Bundy

    Bundy

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    The research seems to have determined the minimum number of atoms with identical spin orientations required to hold data stable in a binary system. Qubits are not used this way.
  8. Drone

    Drone

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    ^ They are. Qubits could use all 3 spin orientations. If you ain't bothered to read it's not my problem.
  9. CrAsHnBuRnXp

    CrAsHnBuRnXp

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    I sent this into qubit 2 days ago. :laugh:

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