1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

IBM to Produce Micron's HMC in Debut of First Commercial, 3D Chip-Making Capability

Discussion in 'News' started by qubit, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2007
    Messages:
    9,821 (4.05/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3,480
    IBM (NYSE: IBM) and Micron Technology, Inc. announced today that Micron will begin production of a new memory device built using the first commercial CMOS manufacturing technology to employ through-silicon vias (TSVs). IBM's advanced TSV chip-making process enables Micron's Hybrid Memory Cube (HMC) to achieve speeds 15 times faster than today's technology.

    Micron's Hybrid Memory Cube features a stack of individual chips connected by vertical pipelines or “vias,” shown above. IBM’s new 3-D manufacturing technology, used to connect the 3D micro structure, will be the foundation for commercial production of the new memory cube.

    IBM will present the details of its TSV manufacturing breakthrough at the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting on December 5 in Washington, DC.

    [​IMG]

    HMC parts will be manufactured at IBM's advanced semiconductor fab in East Fishkill, N.Y., using the company's 32nm, high-K metal gate process technology.

    HMC technology uses advanced TSVs — vertical conduits that electrically connect a stack of individual chips — to combine high-performance logic with Micron's state-of-the-art DRAM. HMC delivers bandwidth and efficiencies a leap beyond current device capabilities. HMC prototypes, for example, clock in with bandwidth of 128 gigabytes per second (GB/s). By comparison, current state-of-the-art devices deliver 12.8 GB/s. HMC also requires 70 percent less energy to transfer data while offering a small form factor — just 10 percent of the footprint of conventional memory.

    HMC will enable a new generation of performance in applications ranging from large-scale networking and high-performance computing, to industrial automation and, eventually, consumer products.

    "This is a milestone in the industry move to 3D semiconductor manufacturing," said Subu Iyer, IBM Fellow. "The manufacturing process we are rolling out will have applications beyond memory, enabling other industry segments as well. In the next few years, 3D chip technology will make its way into consumer products, and we can expect to see drastic improvements in battery life and functionality of devices."

    "HMC is a game changer, finally giving architects a flexible memory solution that scales bandwidth while addressing power efficiency," said Robert Feurle, Vice President of DRAM Marketing for Micron. "Through collaboration with IBM, Micron will provide the industry's most capable memory offering."

    Additional information, technical specifications, tools and support for adopting HMC technology can be found at micron.com.
    HalfAHertz and 1c3d0g say thanks.
  2. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2007
    Messages:
    9,821 (4.05/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3,480
    Wow, first Intel's Tri-gate 3D tech and now this! :rockout:
  3. AsRock

    AsRock TPU addict

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2007
    Messages:
    10,726 (4.14/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,635
    Location:
    US
    And it's with 2 respectable companys too :).
  4. krisna159

    krisna159 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    Messages:
    65 (0.03/day)
    Thanks Received:
    2
    Location:
    indonesia
    i will say
    "what if" AMD merge with IBM and use that technology to bulid new micro procesor to compete with intel?? maybe... it will be nice competision......:toast:
    but that was just "dream":ohwell::shadedshu
  5. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2007
    Messages:
    9,821 (4.05/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3,480
    Yes, that would be a fantastic dream. However, what kills it is that exclusive licence agreement Intel signed with AMD 30 years ago, which prevents them partnering with anyone else to produce better x86 processors. :banghead:
  6. 1c3d0g

    1c3d0g

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2007
    Messages:
    685 (0.28/day)
    Thanks Received:
    59
    Finally high-density, low-power memory is becoming a reality. I'd love to see this coincide with a Haswell release. :)
  7. Fx

    Fx

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2008
    Messages:
    500 (0.24/day)
    Thanks Received:
    87
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    yep, the stifling bitches. I hate Intel with a passion

    kudos to IBM & Micron though- this is awesome news
  8. FishHead69

    FishHead69

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    35 (0.02/day)
    Thanks Received:
    17
    Location:
    Rocky,QLD,AU
    So what was the go when they teamed up with Motorola to produce the Athlon http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Athlon Which at the time it came out kicked intels arse

    Whats stopping them from doing the same thing agian ?
  9. HalfAHertz

    HalfAHertz

    Joined:
    May 4, 2009
    Messages:
    1,886 (0.99/day)
    Thanks Received:
    378
    Location:
    Singapore
    Um how did they solve the heat issues that plagued previous 3d designs?
  10. dogchainx

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    Messages:
    42 (0.02/day)
    Thanks Received:
    14
    Location:
    UTAH 84341
    Didn't IBM develop an internal micro-channel liquid cooling tech? Let me google...

    LINK
    AsRock and Mussels say thanks.
  11. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2007
    Messages:
    9,821 (4.05/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3,480
    Yeah, that's clever tech, I remember reading about this before. Pushing liquid through tiny pipes takes a lot of effort, however, as it becomes highly viscous, like treacle. The article doesn't explain how they get around this.
  12. human_error

    human_error

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,721 (0.83/day)
    Thanks Received:
    458
    That will never happen. IBM's left the consumer space and focuses the remaining hardware divisions on business customers, where the power series chips do very nicely. The only 2 areas AMD has an advantage are consumer CPUs and graphics, which again is on the consumer end of things (even workstation cards are not big enough business for IBM).

    Still this tech looks pretty good, and when it filters down to consumer products could lead to some very high density SSDs and RAM modules.
  13. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Messages:
    41,974 (11.73/day)
    Thanks Received:
    9,389
    this tech could still be used for CPU cache by AMD and intel, if they licenced it. so its good news all around.


    video cards could massively benefit too, with 10x boosts to VRAM bandwidth.


    shit, even SSD's...
  14. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2007
    Messages:
    9,821 (4.05/day)
    Thanks Received:
    3,480
    Indeed, we can never have enough bandwidth.
  15. Super XP

    Super XP

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    2,743 (0.80/day)
    Thanks Received:
    538
    Location:
    Ancient Greece, Acropolis
    What AMD needs to do is get back to joint ventures with IBM and design CPU's together.

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page