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Innodisk Releases DDR4 RDIMM Samples to Server Market

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, May 16, 2013.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Innodisk is proud to be among the first to supply (DDR4) registered DIMM product samples to key server companies for their next-generation systems. With this announcement, Innodisk, an industry leader in DRAM modules for industrial applications and embedded systems, will continue to offer the most advanced technology to its customers. The result of almost eight years of development, DDR4 (Double Data Rate 4) technology improves on the previous generation, DDR3, in every way. These new memory products provide users with greater performance, but can still cut costs by saving power and space, and reducing waste heat.

    DDR4 offers a giant leap in peak performance over DDR3 technology, with a 3.2 Gbps data transfer rate. In fact, DDR4 could eventually even surpass this already high rate, according to standards organization JEDEC, in the same way that DDR3 surpassed its initial ceiling of 1.6 Gbps. DDR4 memory bus speeds start at 2133MHz, which already offers a huge jump in potential performance from the average bus speed of 1333MHz and 1666MHz offered by DDR3.

    Voltage:DDR4 devices run on significantly lower voltages than devices using DDR3 or DDR2 technology. JEDEC's specifications suggest that DDR4 will operate with a power envelope of 1.2 volts, compared to the 1.5 volts demanded by the more power-hungry DDR3 generation. Lower voltages help extend component lifespans.

    Power consumption: DDR4 modules will reduce power consumption by approximately 40 percent compared to its predecessor DDR3 modules operating at 1.35V. Lower power consumption offers lower operating costs by cutting power bills, as well as a substantial reduction in heat output which helps extend lifetimes of system components, further reducing costs.

    Density: With DDR4, the maximum capacity per chip has now been doubled from 64GB to 128GB. The higher memory densities possible with DDR4 will save space, simplify module construction, and improve internal airflow.

    With this head start in DDR4 technology, Innodisk is ready meet the needs of tomorrow's applications. As the IT landscape moves to adopt cloud computing practices, companies are relying more heavily on data centers with powerful server infrastructures. Innodisk offers registered DIMM in capacities of 4GB, 8GB and 16GB, so that Innodisk server customers can always be sure to have the perfect product to suit the exact capacity of each of their system designs.

    Innodisk looks forward to working together with server OEMs to create the next-generation platforms that are demanded by tomorrow's challenges.
     
  2. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Isn't that supposed to be Gb (gigabit)? If it were GiB we'd have a single stick with over a TiB of memory. XD

    Even so, 16 GiB per chip sounds ridiculous seeing how a single stick can have 16 chips (or more, depending on physical dimensions).

    I'm so confused. :confused:
     
    Crunching for Team TPU
  3. jihadjoe

    jihadjoe

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    Ya hear that Microsoft? We're getting loads of RAM to play with, so give us a UI with the complexity to take advantage of it! Not those simplistic mono-color tiles that barely take up 100kb per 10% of screen space. :D
     
  4. FrustratedGarrett

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    It would still take a lot longer to access memory and read a data word or an instruction than to execute the instruction on the CPU or read data off your Level 2 cache. However, if they manage to come up with a memory technology that's some 30x faster than that, CPUs would probably get rid of cache memory, and performance would go up by a factor of 2x to 3x, and hyper threading would become obsolete.
     
  5. Fourstaff

    Fourstaff Moderator Staff Member

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    Efficiency is always a good thing, no? :confused:
     
    Prima.Vera and hellrazor say thanks.
  6. jigar2speed

    jigar2speed

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    Bulls eye, i couldn't have put it better.
     
  7. NeoXF

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    ^ Remember, 640kb memory is enough for everyone! ...or for 6 tiles and some extra on the side...


    3,2Gbps right off the bat? Wow, that's awesome! DDR4 + triple DIMM/channel or more should tare it up in the APU world...

    Also, I think it's 1333MHz and 1600MHz not 1666...
     
  8. Jorge

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    DDR4 is primarily designed for servers and should help them due to high data loads with multiple processors. It doesn't offer any benefit to desktops or laptops at this point in time as DDR3 isn't saturated once you get above 1333 MHz. X86 based server CPUs don't currently operate above 1600 MHz. AFAIK, so the increased frequency isn't likely to be of value for awhile.

    We already have 1.35V DDR3, so again this isn't a big deal but a step in the right direction for high density RAM used in servers. These DIMMs are registered so they wouldn't normally be used for laptop or desktop, but instead in servers.
     
    Jacez says thanks.
  9. Jacez New Member

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    ^This^

    As long as you overclock to 1600Mhz, you're fine.
     
  10. NeoXF

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    AMD's hUMA would say otherwise...

    And the only reason DDR3 is still enough and speeds beyond 1866 are overrated, is because x86 performance is largely stagnant and thus, no need for larger bandwidth when our "puny" quad cores of today can barely make use of it even in memory-intensive software like packers/unpackcers.

    Server markets are at least growing in core numbers and modularity/efficiency, which in turn, need more bandwidth to play with... otherwise nothing special there either.
     
  11. Prima.Vera

    Prima.Vera

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    As always, the quick adoption of DDR4 for desktops will be if they offer significant performance improvement in games or apps. It is already proven, that games don't improve their performance with 2133Mhz RAMs or more, so it will be interesting how those DDR4 will react, considering that they will have a lot bigger timmings.
     
  12. NeoXF

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    Yes, unlikely it will help for most cases (normal x86 computing)... but APU/SoC/powerul iGPU markets could grow a lot very soon... (if it ever releases) desktop Broadwell should need a good deal of speed in system memory, eDRAM or not... Also, don't get me started on Kaveri/successors...
     

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