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Intel Delivers First 34 nm NAND Flash SSDs, Advancement Lowers Prices by upto 60%

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Jul 21, 2009.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Intel Corporation is moving to a more advanced, 34- nanometer (nm) manufacturing process for its leading NAND flash-based Solid State Drive (SSD) products, which are an alternative to a computer's hard drive. The move to 34nm will help lower prices of the SSDs up to 60 percent for PC and laptop makers and consumers who buy them due to the reduced die size and advanced engineering design.

    The multi-level cell (MLC) Intel X25-M Mainstream SATA SSD is aimed at laptop and desktop PCs and available in 80 Gigabyte (GB) and 160GB versions. SSDs are data storage devices found inside computers. Because SSDs have no moving parts they offer faster performance and greater energy efficiency and durability than traditional hard disk drives (HDDs). A draw for gamers, media creators and technology enthusiasts, SSDs have also played a key role in the emergence of ultra-thin and light notebook PCs that are becoming increasingly popular due to their design, size and longer battery life.

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    "Our goal was to not only be first to achieve 34nm NAND flash memory lithography, but to do so with the same or better performance than our 50nm version," said Randy Wilhelm, Intel vice president and general manager, Intel NAND Solutions Group. "We made quite an impact with our breakthrough SSDs last year, and by delivering the same or even better performance with today's new products, our customers, both consumers and manufacturers, can now enjoy them at a fraction of the cost."

    The Intel X25-M on 34nm flash memory is drop-in compatible with the current 50nm version and will continue to be drop-in compatible to replace existing hard disk drives (HDDs).

    Compared to its previous 50nm version, the new Intel X25-M offers improved latency and faster random write Input/Output Operations Per Second (IOPS). Specifically, Intel's new SSD provides a 25 percent reduction in latency, for quicker access to data, operating at 65-microsecond latency compared to approximately 4,000 microseconds for an HDD.

    Random write performance increases twofold, further separating the X25-M from other competing SSDs. By delivering up to 6,600 4KB write IOPS and up to 35,000 read IOPS, the X25-M continues to set the bar for SSDs, while leapfrogging HDDs which only operate at several hundred IOPS. This provides for markedly faster system and application responsiveness. These improvements in latency and IOPS not only benefit desktop and notebook users, but also server and workstation users, as they utilize Intel's cost-effective, yet performance-oriented, MLC SSDs for enterprise computing.

    New channel prices for the X25-M 80GB are $225 for quantities up to 1,000 units (a 60 percent reduction from the original introduction price of $595 a year ago). The 160GB version is $440 (down from $945 at introduction) for quantities up to 1,000 units. The X25-M comes in a standard 2.5-inch form factor. The X18-M, in a 1.8-inch form factor, will begin shipping on 34nm later in the quarter.

    Drop-in compatible with SATA-based HDDs and all operating systems, the X25-M will also support Microsoft Windows 7 when it becomes available. At that time, Intel plans to deliver a firmware update to allow support of the Windows 7 Trim command, along with an end user tool, to allow users to optimize the performance of their SSD on Windows XP and Vista operating systems.

    For further information on Intel's High Performance line of solid-state drives, including the Intel X25-M Mainstream and the Intel X25-E Extreme SATA SSD targeted for server, workstation and enterprise storage applications, visit Intel SSD.
     
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  2. h3llb3nd4

    h3llb3nd4 New Member

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    wow that's a huge drop.
    but we want more
    (b'o')b
     
  3. ShadowFold

    ShadowFold New Member

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    Still too overpriced :shadedshu
     
  4. Icewind31 New Member

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    kudos for the progress though
     
  5. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Yup, I'll stick to spinning metal.
     
    Crunching for Team TPU
  6. Jakl

    Jakl New Member

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    Well AT LEAST prices went down at some extent.. Intel hopefully is moving down to "Saving Money" terms like AMD , but who can beat Intel anyways?
     
  7. zOaib New Member

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    Raptors FTW.
     
  8. Kitkat New Member

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    i hope the other ones drop already.
     
  9. Basard

    Basard

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    aww, sweet, so when their CPUs drop to 32nm (or is it 34 for cpus too?), they will also drop in price 60%!!! right?!?:laugh:
     
  10. Fx

    Fx

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    the 80GB is supposed to have up to 6.6K IOPS for the Random 4KB Writes while the 160GB goes up to 8.6K

    an increase from gen1 of 2x to 2.5x respectively
     
  11. HolyCow02

    HolyCow02 New Member

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    well that is good news. Prices drops are always a nice thing. I'll have to pick on up eventually so I can move stuff off my OS SSD. Can we say games only SSD? Yes, yes we can
     
  12. johnnyfiive

    johnnyfiive

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    I really want a 128gb SSD just for games. Cost too damn much :(
     
  13. extrasalty

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    Old X25-M are already sold out on newegg. I'm really glad Intel is not trying to milk it too much. After all this will lead to drops in prices by everyone.
     
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  14. Aximous

    Aximous New Member

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    We can hope Indilinx based SSDs like OCZ Vertex and the likes become more affordable too
    they're more closer to the most of the people's reach than the Intel ones.
     
  15. Fx

    Fx

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    your statement contradicts itself

    you hope that OCZ and others can become more affordable too yet that at the higher price premiums in which they currently reside that they are closer to people's reach? :wtf:
     
  16. Aximous

    Aximous New Member

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    A decent 60GB Vertex or Torqx (patriot) currently costs around 230$
    A 80GB Intel SSD is about 100$ higher than those
    and i said i hope they become cheaper too so most people can afford buying a SSD after all.
    what's so confusing?
     
  17. sethk New Member

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    Well the 80GB intel drive has been $100 more expensive until now, the new pricing (not clear when this takes effect) is $225 for 80GB. So 20GB more for $5 less, AND even faster performance than the current 80GB drive, which was already faster than the Vertex in most real world tests other than sequential read access.

    I'm looking forward to the first new benchmarks. Also, I think naming the new drive, which has different performance, the same as the old drive is retarded. I see why they did it (to clear out old inventory) but I think it is a very anti-consumer move.
     
  18. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    yes, lets buy small overpriced drives that get out-paced by 1TB and 1.5TB drives, at half the price.


    These drives are looking good. I lol at the people who still whine on price, THEY JUST HALVED IT! you cant expect more than that, each generation!
     
  19. OnBoard

    OnBoard New Member

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    I'm loving how they make the 34nm process to being the key to 60% price drop. Prices have dropped 60% do to there being a year since the last models were introduced..

    Capacity has gone up at the same time, year ago 80GB and 160GB were the top end of SSD with a price premium, now they are mainstream.
     
  20. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    price doesnt magically drop over time. If it costs them the same to make, then they charge the same to sell it. smaller fab process means more modules come out for the same cost of materials input, and that reduction in manufacturing cost directly comes out of the sale price.
     
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  21. OnBoard

    OnBoard New Member

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    But it does :) Except for E8000 series, just about anything related to computers costs less now that they did a year ago.

    If it's better yields, more efficient manufacturing, more people buying the product or store discounts doesn't matter to me. What matters is the end price and that comes down the longer you wait (until a new 'better' product is released and price goes up).

    Intel's claim is just wrong in that press release. You have to take today's price for a 50nm SDD and compare it to the new 34nm and then you have a %tage.

    I can't go selling my E7200 @ $113 and claim it to have 15% lower price, when it would cost more than faster models out there. It would be 15% less than the original $133 price, but it's irrelevant.
     
  22. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    you got my point, and you didnt at the same time.

    The prices for manufacturing are what sets the prices. stores can drop their profits off to ditch old stock, but they can never go below what it cost THEM to buy!
     
  23. Easo

    Easo

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    Still have to wait...
     
  24. 1c3d0g

    1c3d0g

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    Go Intel Go!
     
  25. Fx

    Fx

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    and c'mon Newegg! lets see this stock!
     

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