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Intel Developing Clarkdale to Replace Havendale Desktop Dual-Core Chip

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    On the course of coming up with mainstream derivatives of the Nehalem architecture, for Intel, there seems to be a big deal of uncertainty surrounding the dual-core parts. Havendale (desktop) and Auburndale (notebook) were stated by initial company road-maps as the company's dual-core chips. Later, news emerged of Intel reportedly scrapping both chips to find a 32 nm replacement in another chip codenamed Arrandale. In the latest company-slide exposé by VR-Zone, details emerge of yet another iteration to Intel's plans: Clarkdale. Correct spelling is Clarkdale and Arrandale by the way (not Clarksdale or Arandale).

    While it is unclear at this point, if this chip, like the Arrandale (32 nm CPU + 32 nm IGP), is built to be deployed on both desktop and mobile platforms, the reason behind its development gains clarity. The Ibex-Peak platform design by Intel, be it dual-core or quad-core, consists of a standard multi-chip module (MCM)-based design, where two dice populate a package: the central processor, and the northbridge. The design gives the company flexibility by introducing a degree of modularity. After scrapping plans of a full-on processor built on the 45 nm high-K manufacturing process, Intel seems to have realised that its foundries won't be able to cater to many designs based on the 32 nm process initially, at once. Taking advantage of the MCM design, Intel is working on this new chip: Clarkdale, which consists of the processor die built on the 32 nm second-generation high-K process, with the northbridge being built on the existing 45 nm process. This design helps evade the manufacturing constraints Intel might have initially. The northbridge die will feature an integrated graphics processor that connects to its output using the flexible-display interface. With this, Intel is looking to bring in immediate and cost-cutting to the extant feasible.

    [​IMG]

    Source: VR-Zone
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 9, 2009
  2. farlex85

    farlex85 New Member

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    So P53/55/57s are going here. So where's lynnfield? Was that canceled too?
  3. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Lynnfield is on course. At least there's no drama surrounding its launch, so far. Dual-core chips are the ones that end up selling the most. The more cost-cutting goes into making them, the better for Intel.
  4. farlex85

    farlex85 New Member

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    Haven't heard any details about it either though, and it should be coming soon right? I also thought the p5x line would apply to them, but I guess we'll have to see.
  5. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Traditionally, P45, P43, P35, P33, etc. were the name of the north bridge. Seeing how some chips move the north bridge to the processor, there will only be a south bridge. It remains to be seen which chips have the north bridge on the CPU and which don't. I imagine any package that has the north bridge on the CPU won't have an associated X/P/Q/G chip, just a south bridge.
    Crunching for Team TPU

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