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Intel Explains Brand Strategy with Core

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    In a recent blog post by Intel's Bill Calder, details emerged on how Intel will be treating its product names to make it simple for consumers to choose their client products. The strategy lays to rest a long-standing speculation that markers such as "i7", "i5", and "i3" remain confined to a particular kind (read: core design) of the client processor lineup, and spells out the purpose of these markers, and how they make it easy to figure out which Intel processor to buy.

    To begin with, there are three markers it calls "modifiers": i3, i5, and i7, to denote entry-level, mid-level, and high-level respectively. These serve merely as modifiers to the brand "Intel Core". As such, "Intel Core i7" isn't a brand in itself, but a higher class of Intel Core series processors, than Core i5 and Core i3. The actual silicon, socket, or architecture used remains abstract to the marker. For example, some higher variants of the "Lynnfield" quad-core processor will use the name Core i7, while the bulk of its mainstream lineup remains in Core i5. The "Clarksfield" mobile quad-core chip makes it to the Core i7 series, as it denotes the highest performance available for notebooks. In all, we can expect Intel to use its modifiers solely to explain what features each processor carries, to replace the existing strategy of giving model numbers to spread products across value, mainstream, performance, and extreme performance segments.

    [​IMG]

    Says Bill Calder:
    "We are focusing our strategy around a primary 'hero' client brand which is Intel Core. Today the Intel Core brand has a mind boggling array of derivatives (such as Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad, etc). Over time those will go away and in its place will be a simplified family of Core processors spanning multiple levels: Intel Core i3 processor, Intel Core i5 processor, and Intel Core i7 processors. Core i3 and Core i5 are new modifiers and join the previously announced Intel Core i7 to round out the family structure. It is important to note that these are not brands but modifiers to the Intel Core brand that signal different features and benefits. For example, upcoming processors such as Lynnfield (desktop) will carry the Intel Core brand, but will be available as either Intel Core i5 or Intel Core i7 depending upon the feature set and capability. Clarksfield (mobile) will have the Intel Core i7 name."

    Source: Intel
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2009
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  2. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Many Thanks to DanishDevil for sending this in.
     
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  3. Studabaker

    Studabaker New Member

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    And announces the i3? Hadn't heard of this i3 yet...
     
  4. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    No, i3 surfaced a long time ago. Most of the dual-core chips make it to i3.
     
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  5. Studabaker

    Studabaker New Member

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    Right on, I figured it would have to be dual cores.
     
  6. MRCL

    MRCL

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    Will indeed make things a bit simpler. The Intel processor variety is slightly confusing as of now, especially for a beginner.
     
  7. Yukikaze

    Yukikaze

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    So there are going to be Socket 1156 Core i7s as well as Socket 1366 Core i7s ? That's just adding confusion to the whole multiple-socket affair.
     
  8. MRCL

    MRCL

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    Now that you mention that, and if this is true... I'd like to withdraw my previous statement please:eek:
     
  9. Kenshai

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    I think that's how I read it to, that has to be about the worst naming scheme ever.
     
  10. toyo

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    I can't believe they'll sell the top i5 as full blown Nehalem... that'll be just robbing. Sorry ass Intel didn't find any other solutions for the price crisis resulted from the fact that high end i5 will be better then low end i7. At least, give us one socket like lga 775 was so there are simple upgrade solutioins available. get you i7 920 while you can...
     
  11. ShinyG

    ShinyG New Member

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    Yes, have the same logo and print the i3, i5 and i7 in semi-transparent hard to read letters. Good idea!
     
  12. DanishDevil

    DanishDevil

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    What I find interesting is that mobile chips will be i7 branded. They're definitely not going to be Nehalem chips unless they go super small manufacturing process and lower their TDP and wattage by about 75%.

    And a little off topic...

    Yay first submitted news! :p
     
  13. lemonadesoda

    lemonadesoda

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    Intel have royally screwed up their attempt to overlay a new naming scheme yet again. And it's even worse than the nVidia renaming fiasco last year.

    FIRE the marketing department.

    ****

    The Intel blog (and the whole internet) is full of criticism for the "new simple naming scheme". Irrespective of how stupid the naming scheme is, the whole marketing department should be fired for the complete PR fail.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2009
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  14. crazy pyro

    crazy pyro New Member

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    The point they're making with Clarksfield being i7 is just that it's the highest performance you can get in that category of processors.
     
  15. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    It's not like Intel won't tell you which socket it works on.
     
  16. Yukikaze

    Yukikaze

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    Obviously they will, but this is still confusing.
     
  17. MRCL

    MRCL

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    When I was not yet on TPU (and had very few knowledge of computers), I didn't have a clue what CPU goes with which mobo. Now imagine someone like me back then trying to choose 1156, 1366, i5, i7, now what?:wtf:
     
  18. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    You have Socket 604 Xeons, and then you have s771, s775, and now s1366 Xeons. How much of a difference did it make? Couldn't you make out which Xeon fits which socket looking at the number scheme? Probably the same with this. You may need to look at the model number scheme. I'm expecting something along the lines of "Core i7 820, 840, 860..." to tell me it's based on Lynnfield and LGA-1156.
     
  19. Yukikaze

    Yukikaze

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    Xeons are a bad example because Xeons are not targeted at the clueless end user. On the local forums here people STILL don't know that the QX9775 is LGA771, so you want to tell me that this new naming scheme won't confuse less tech-savvy users ?
     
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  20. DaedalusHelios

    DaedalusHelios

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    Its really not that hard to understand really. I think it will be easier for the new people because they don't think of i7, i5, and i3 as being a part. They will think of it as performance branding regardless of how Intel feels about it.

    For example if your car is a "TypeR" or a "S" model people think "sporty". Now when you hear i7 you think workstation or high performance version of whatever platform. i5 means mainstream performance for every task. i3 will be entry level for kids, people on a budget, or low performance needs like internet and multimedia.

    If people can't understand that after its explained, they honestly have more problems than understanding computers most likely. Or they could read it again but a little slower to really take in the details if they have been out of the loop a while.

    Why do people always complain about naming schemes. They are really easy to understand if you just read about it. Reading is essentual to understanding the world around us.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2009
  21. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Less tech-savy users buy their PCs from HP or Dell.

    When you are the one building a PC, there's no excuse not to have done a 10 minute research. Especially when 100s or dollars of investment is at stake.

    It's a little early to bitch.
     
  22. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    So, in there effort to make things more "simple" to understand, they completely take out any association with a respective socket?

    So somebody could presumably buy an LGA-1156 board, and accidentally buy a 1366 Core i7?

    This does not simplify matters at all.
     
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  23. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Again, let's wait for a number scheme to surface. All i3, i5, i7 are intended to do is tell you which class of processor you're buying (value, mainstream, performance).
     
  24. Studabaker

    Studabaker New Member

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    Also, it seems like you guys are basing the possibility that all 3 processors could be designed for different sockets on this statement: "The actual silicon, socket, or architecture used remains abstract to the marker".

    Although it says that, I don't think they will jumble things up badly enough as if to sell 1156 i7s and 1366 i3s and such.
     
  25. DaedalusHelios

    DaedalusHelios

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    Its no different than buying a LGA775 board that does not support 45nm.

    Its just another thing you have to match up. I suppose some people bought P4 478 processors and tried to stick it in LGA775 motherboards but thats their mistake really. :laugh:

    If you are uninformed you make mistakes.

    BTW I know you would not have an issue with it. I am talking about the public.
     

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