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Intel Roadmap Provides Insight into Upcoming Nehalem Models

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Jul 16, 2008.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    The latest publication of model-specific launch schedule of Intel processors up to Q3 2009 show several models of Extreme processors based on the Bloomfield core beginning from the 3.20 GHz Bloomfield part, which could be succeeded sometime in Q2 2009.

    The very first wave of Nehalem architecture based processors arrives in Q4 2008, with the 3.20 GHz Extreme Bloomfield part, the Core 2 Quad is already cleaved into Performance and Mainstream segments, with a 2.93 GHz Bloomfield part making it to the former and a 2.66 GHz part to the latter segments. This is also the time when Intel makes the final additions to the Yorkfield family with the Q9650 processor in the performance and a Q9400 to the mainstream segments. The roadmap shows a gradual synthesis between the current generation and the next. By Q3 2009, Intel will have a full-fledged line-up of processors, including the part that has overclockers looking forward to, the Havendale. This chip is a successor to Wolfdale. It is a dual-core Nehalem-derived chip that supports Hyper-Threading. Also by Q3, the mainstream quad-core offerings would divide between lower Bloomfield and the Lynnfield core processors.

    Also, a rather interesting tidbit is a slide which shows Lynnfield schematic with "Integrated or discrete graphics", with the video hardware marker attached to the CPU. Would this mean Intel beats AMD in the race for the first CPU+GPU CPU+IGP?

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Source: Expreview
     
  2. yogurt_21

    yogurt_21

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    interestign watching the highend, seems like we're in for a year of the same cpu just upped in clocks, which gives me quite a bit more time on my q6700, nice.
     
  3. farlex85

    farlex85 New Member

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    It's not the same cpu at all, the extra cores and ht and qpi and direct ddr3 controller w/ triple-channel are what will set it apart, clock speeds aren't going to be that much faster than current ones. Looks like the Lynnfield only has dual-channel ddr3, that sucks. I think that 2.66 bloomfield will be calling my name, same stock speed as my current, big leap forward. Also, I'm wondering what the extreme's of this gen will offer, it seems like most of the procs will have their mulit unlocked, so where is the extra $1000 playing in this time I wonder.
     
  4. yogurt_21

    yogurt_21

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    you're missing the point, look at the roadmap, once bloomfield is out theres not real changes for a year afterwards, just upped clock speeds.
     
  5. farlex85

    farlex85 New Member

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    Oh I see what your saying, well that's just how their tick-tock works. After a year they'll release the 32nm, then begin upping the clock speeds again. New core, better speeds for a year, another new core.
     
  6. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    well if you look at the core 2 line where 'nothing much has changed' we have a lot of variations. we have 1MB, 2MB, 4MB caches in dual cores, and 6/8/12MB in the quads. even without a die shrink, several variations and changes can happen within a generation.
     
  7. dani31 New Member

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    It'll call many many names for sure... well I guess that's Intel's understanding of "mainstream" LOL
     
  8. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    i think i'm understanding intels definitions of mainstream and enthusiast now.

    To them, enthusiast is really hardcore work, but shy of server. We're talking benchmark nuts, video encoders and so on.

    Home users (light media, web browsers) go the 'value' stuff while gamers/HD media fit into 'mainstream'
     

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