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Intel 'Rockstars' Show off Future Research Concepts, Projects

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    A sneak peek of tomorrow was provided by Intel Corporation today at the company’s annual Research@Intel Day. Nearly 40 futuristic projects and concepts were showcased in such areas as eco-technology, 3-D Internet, enterprise IT and wireless mobility. Intel also has made public a beta website where users can play “point, counterpoint” by submitting a statement found online and learning whether he or she has been duped.

    Two researchers on hand included Ajay Bhatt, the co-inventor of USB, the standard to connect devices to computers and Joshua Smith, a pioneer in wireless power and robotics. Both are currently featured in a new commercial called “Rock Star,” which is part of the company’s current Sponsors of Tomorrow marketing campaign.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    “I hope attendees get a chance to speak with and meet our very own rock stars from Intel Labs today,” said Justin Rattner, Intel’s chief technology officer. “What the researchers are developing today in the labs will ultimately make future computing and communications faster, easier and more energy efficient, and have a significant impact on people’s work and home life in the coming years.”

    Rattner, also an Intel Senior Fellow and vice president and director of Intel Labs, discussed recent changes to Intel’s research agendas and priorities. The goal is to improve the likelihood of impact and tightly align with the company’s overall growth vectors such as mobility, visual computing and system-on-chip design, where many more computing and communications functions are placed on a single piece of silicon. The new organisation, called Intel Labs, will identify game-changing opportunities for tech innovation and deliver breakthrough discoveries in those areas.

    Several of these research innovations were on display at the event. Demonstrations covered power efficiency for mobile devices, immersive connected experiences, mobility and enterprise IT.

    Future Atom-based MIDs and Smartphones to Implement New Technique from Labs
    Platform power management (PPM), a research effort first discussed in this same forum last year, is one of the innovative power management technologies behind “Moorestown,” the codename of a future member of the Atom family that targets mobile Internet devices (MIDs). Rattner was joined onstage by Ticky Thakkar, Intel Fellow and director of platform architecture for the Ultra Mobile Group, to disclose that this research has helped enable up to a 50x reduction in platform idle power over today’s Atom-based platform, which translates to much longer battery life.

    The power reduction technique is a fundamentally new approach that introduces changes to silicon for enabling hardware to play a major role in reducing power consumption. In this new approach, hardware implements power policies set by the operating system to manage power in much less time and at much finer granularity. The computer will be able to quickly, aggressively and intelligently reduce power or even power down portions of the system not in use – as with wireless radios or I/O subsystems -- and immediately power back on when needed with zero impact to the user experience. Platform power management could someday benefit the full range of Intel products, from MIDs to high-performance servers.

    Dispute Finder: Are You Being Duped?
    "The Web" is nearly synonymous with "information." While much of this information is useful, a significant amount could be characterised as false, misleading or biased. Dispute finder is an early research effort from Intel Labs that enables Internet surfers to navigate through a minefield of contradicting information much easier.

    While a user is reading an online news article, blog or web site, text snippets are automatically highlighted if information found elsewhere contradicts a given claim made. Clicking on the highlighted snippet, like “a glass of wine a day is good for you,” reveals an argument graph showing sources on either side of the issue. Every single claim and evidence has been user generated, similar to how Wikipedia works and are maintained in a central venue online where anyone can contribute.

    Future of the Internet: Much Less Text
    As future Intel chips scale from a few cores to many, researchers at Intel Labs believe the transition to mainstream parallel computing will lead to a future Internet that is rich in 3-D graphics and relies a lot less on text, making possible a more immersive Internet experience with ultra-realistic 3D visualisations and natural human-computer interfaces. Picture a travel web site that allows you to check out your vacation destination, like New York City, before you actually get there. So in addition to a virtual walk around the hotel room, users could also check out Times Square, restaurants, nearby theaters and even walk the route to estimate how far they are from the hotel.

    Intel has begun prototyping the 3-D Internet in the scientific world first, using a tool called ScienceSim. This is a common place on the net where scientists can create visual simulations online and collaborate more effectively using these capabilities. The idea is to advance research through visualisation, like a model of coastal margins and tides in order to study the impacts of human activity.

    Creating a More Flexible Internet, Running on a General Purpose Computer
    The Internet’s original designers never anticipated its astounding growth and success. Consequently, the Internet relies on highly specialised network equipment often with hard coded support for a pre-defined set of packet routing capabilities. This presents challenges given the rapidly evolving demands of new applications. Intel researchers propose Router Bricks as a simple, but radical solution, allowing networks to be built from general-purpose computers rather than specialised equipment. The prototype demonstrated builds a high-speed router from clusters of Intel Xeon -based servers running open-source software. Rather than wait years for specialised routing hardware to evolve, network programmers in the future could cheaply and rapidly program new router functions using the familiar general purpose computer as their platform.

    Source: Intel
     
  2. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi New Member

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    I <3 these ads
     
  3. h3llb3nd4

    h3llb3nd4 New Member

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    Heh, I like the 3d internet idea:D
    But wasn't that a old idea?
     
  4. a111087

    a111087

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    dispute finder is what i want
     
  5. ejeo New Member

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    i dont need any new fancy intel processor to do any 3d worlds they could have built this years ago and i would have been rdy for it.
     
  6. Velvet Wafer

    Velvet Wafer New Member

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    lol rockstars are supposed to live hard and short and die young... maybe not the optimal slogan..
     
  7. Steevo

    Steevo

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    Great a ultra powerful portible phone that costs $$ so you can look cool in moms minivan.


    Rock you with your ummm, plasma blaster?, out.


    When they make something that is useable and a decent completing package to go with it let me know.
     
    10 Million points folded for TPU
  8. ZoneDymo

    ZoneDymo

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    A Rockstar is nowadays no longer linked to people making rock music and the live style those of the past had.
     
  9. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    3D internet has been around for years. It started back around 1995 with VRML. It now has a successor called X3D. You can get plug-ins for your browser(s) to view VRML/X3D "worlds".

    The idea never really took off most likely from a lack available bandwidth for most users at the time (ie. Dial-Up). I dabbled in it when it first started to become popular, but many of the sites were painfully slow loading and were not all that impressive to navigate around in.

    I actually had pondered suggesting to W1zz to redo GPU in a 3D environment, but it would not be a trivial undertaking and he's already busier than a one-toothed beaver.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2009
  10. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    i like the idea of a software based router. its more than possible, and it would shakeup the ISP/networking world. an 8 port managed gigabit switch goes for as much as $400 here in Au, you could build a PC with as many network cards for the same price - and have it be a server at the same time.
     
  11. ejeo New Member

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    linux servers are old news had one then shut it down didnt need that lvl of power at home.
     
  12. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    mhmm... every ISP i know of uses cisco based routers, if you can find me a linux distro with that kind of functionality, i'll give you a cookie.
     
  13. beyond_amusia

    beyond_amusia New Member

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    I wonder how many of these we will never see actually make it our of Intel? Kinda sad... so many companies demo good products then never deliever (10 GHz CPUs, StarCraft Ghost...)
     
  14. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    I know that all of the Windows Server OSs as well as 2000, XP and Vista can function as routers or switches, but from a larger network standpoint where there are many wired connections, it's not a very efficient or cost effect way of doing it. At least not here in the US. You can get a 24 Port gigabit switch with 2 fiber uplinks for under $300. I use 3 of them, plus 1 x 8 port ($100), so it would be rather cumbersome trying to cram 60+ connections into server/workstation boxes.

    I think their focus is more on making the software base routers instantly configurable (Router Brick, as they called it) so that you could change the functionality (like adding custom protocols, monitoring/reporting features or whatever) on the fly without having to wait for the router mfgers to add it to their devices.
     
  15. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    the server OS's can do DHCP, but i dont know of any with QOS, routing functions, VOIP systems (at least not by default), port forwarding, etc etc. they do the basics (DHCP, NAT) but little beyond that.
     
  16. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    I know that Windows OS support QOS (as long as all of the devices between source and destination also support QOS, which I believe is a requirement for any QOS device) and that you can also do port forwarding. QOS was also improved starting with WS2003. You are right in that there is no off-the-shelf VOIP stuff in Windows (but I don't use it, so I am no expert there). I am not sure what other routing functions you are talking about.

    In any event, it would be nice to slap togther routing function for your needs (as in what Intel is presenting).
     
  17. Kei

    Kei

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    this should be good!

    so the entire internet will be 1 large highlighted page :laugh:

    Kei

    (btw, I love those rockstart ads)
     
  18. Steevo

    Steevo

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    Routing


    route add -p xx.xx.xx.x mask xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx xx.xx.xx.x METRIC 2 IF 4


    Not as easy as creating a routing rule and having it auto generate mirror rules but still jsut as effective. Did this for a friend who supposedly couldn't share his internet with any other device as it was bound to connectivity only on a PC through a proprietairy card and MAC address. Added the routes, and a wireless router handling the DHCP and he used his Iphone his wifes phone and two laptops and it works fine, total cost, $54 for the wifi.


    My only suggestion is to use notepad to generate a batch file for doing it as typing all the freaking numbers after a few beers gets stupid, plus copy and paste.
     
    10 Million points folded for TPU

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