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Intel's new CPU strategy

Discussion in 'News' started by grazzhoppa, Aug 25, 2005.

  1. grazzhoppa New Member

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    At the 2005 Intel Developer Forum, Intel shared the new direction it is taking its CPUs - the buzzword is energy-efficiency. Mobile, desktop, and server product lines will have reduced power consumption as dual-core CPUs.

    The new design (unnamed by Intel) is akin to the Pentium-M more than the Pentium 4 but has been engineered 'from the ground up' for multi-core and low power operation. Intel says the new design will give five times more performance per watt than the Pentium 4 and three and a half times over the Pentium-M. Clocks speeds will probably mirror AMD's Athlon line and a direct hertz comparison will be more fruitful than it is today.

    Intel's marketing strategy will involve the usual options of gigahertz and cache sizes. But as the design matures, there will be one more option to distinguish models: single thread cores and up to 8 thread capable cores available. Although HyperThreading as we know it today doesn't look like it has a place in the new product lines.

    So I bet you want some code names, if you haven't already heard them.
    • Merom for mobile : 35 watts, 4MB of L2 cache. There is a 5 watt version too.
    • Conroe for desktop : 65 watts, 4MB and 8MB L2 cache versions, and still use LGA775.
    • Woodcrest for server : 80 watts, 8MB L2 cache.
    For some perspective, current top LGA775 Pentium 4s are going at 130 watts and a modest 478 pin 3.0GHz Pentium 4 takes 82 watts.

    You have to consider that the new design shares the processor's cache between the two cores, unlike the current dual-core Pentium D. Sharing the cache is a much more efficient way for the cores to share data with each other. Intel admitted that they rushed the first dual-core design to catch up with AMD and the seperate caches for each core was one of the things that suffered.

    Instead of spewing dirty tech jargon to you that I truthfully don't understand fully, I recommend reading this article from the Inquirer which sums up the new design from as much technical information as Intel has revealed so far.

    For more information about Intel's new architecture:
     
  2. wtf8269

    wtf8269 New Member

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    I've also heard Intel is going to have something crazy like 60nm or something like that out by 2011. My dad brought home an article a couple months ago but I don't really remember the details.
     
  3. grazzhoppa New Member

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    This new line of processors will be on 65nm tech and they'll be available around this time next year. New 65nm Pentium Ds will be available before then. :)
     

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