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iPhone unlocking, video game protection hacking: made legal

Discussion in 'General Software' started by Sasqui, Jul 27, 2010.

  1. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    This is VERY interesting:

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ytech_wguy/ytech_wguy_tc3236

    <snip>
    In addition to the jailbreaking exemption, the FCC announced a few oth er rules that have less sweeping applicability but are still significant:

    • Professors, students and documentary filmmakers are now allowed, for “noncommercial” purposes, to break the copy protection measures on DVDs to be used in classroom or other not-for-profit environments. This doesn’t quite go so far as to grant you and me the right to copy a DVD so we can watch it in two rooms of the house, but it’s now only one step away.

    • As was the topic in the GE ruling I wrote about, the FCC allows computer owners to bypass dongles (hardware devices used in conjunction with software to guarantee the correct owner is behind the keyboard) if they are no longer in operation and can’t be replaced. Dongles are rarities in consumer technology products now, but industrial users are probably thrilled about this, as many go missing and are now impossible to obtain.

    Finally, people are now free to circumvent protection measures on video games — but, strangely, only to investigate and correct security flaws in those games. (Another oddity: Other computer software is not part of this ruling, just video games.)
    </snip>
    WarEagleAU and AlienIsGOD say thanks.
  2. AlienIsGOD

    AlienIsGOD

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    I read about that this morning too. Good for the USA, but AFAIK this has no impact on Canadian Laws.
    Crunching for Team TPU
  3. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    I thought you were free to do anything in Canada :)

    I'm really surprised by this. The DRM folks have lobbied hard for years to prevent these kind of FCC rulings. Must read more about the details.
  4. streetfighter 2

    streetfighter 2 New Member

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    This is a decision made by the Librarian of Congress pursuant to Section 1201(a)(1) of the DMCA. It has ramifications which partly include the FCC but in no way is it a result of a FCC rulings vis-à-vis circuit courts.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/27/technology/27iphone.html?_r=1&ref=technology

    My original post:
    http://forums.techpowerup.com/showpost.php?p=1972246&postcount=2

    Now I may be a simple country hyper-chicken but I get a little concerned when agencies that do not have the power to make or change laws are suddenly doing just that. The yahoo article appears to be erroneous.
    Sasqui says thanks.
  5. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi New Member

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  6. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    Thanks, the NY Times is much more succinct, it's the Library of Congress issuing an interpretation (exception):
    "The Library of Congress, which has the power to define exceptions to an important copyright law, said on Monday that it was legal to bypass a phone’s controls on what software it will run to get “lawfully obtained” "

    Yahoo blows.

    Sorry!
  7. DonInKansas

    DonInKansas

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    The Library of Congress was granted power when the DMCA was written to make changes if deemed neccessary every three years. It's been like this since it came out; only now are the changes sweeping eenough to make news.
  8. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    The Library of Congress is an agency of the legislative branch of the US government. One of the Library's resources is the Copyright Office.

    Here is the statement released by the Librarian of Congess (head of the LOC) regarding these rules.
  9. streetfighter 2

    streetfighter 2 New Member

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    True that. My last statement was referring to the FCC not being able to modify the DMCA without a highly publicized trip to a circuit court. This was the impression I got from the yahoo article which said this was a ruling of the FCC.

    https://www.eff.org/files/filenode/dmca_2009/RM-2008-8.pdf
    That's the full order as hosted by the EFF, who made the initial request to the Register of Copyrights.

    The basis for the exemptions is from Section 1201(a)(1)(B) of the DMCA which is summarized by the Librarian of Congress:
    Here's the bit about video games and why they've been exempted:
    Unfortunately though only games because:
    The case Professor Halderman laid out was because of invasive DRM which exploited security flaws in Windows and/or was not investigated by security researchers because of fear of breaking the law. He mentioned Macrovision Safedisc, Securom and to a lesser extent the Sony Rootkit,.
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2010
    Sasqui says thanks.
  10. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    the spam filter flagged your post, i manually approved it
  11. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    THX, W1zzard

    I should've quoted your entire post, but that sums it up. I guess we can all start working on our security doctorates, eh?

    From what I've read, there are good intentions behind it... even if it's from our own government! :laugh:
  12. Kreij

    Kreij Senior Monkey Moderator Staff Member

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    Crap .. that can only mean one thing ...

    [​IMG]
  13. streetfighter 2

    streetfighter 2 New Member

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    It's really a shame that a consumer still doesn't have the right to bypass a faulty protection scheme. Take for example the release of Splinter Cell Conviction which was (I believe) the first game to feature Ubisoft's new "constant-connection" DRM. Apparently, or so I'm told, some intrepid piracy activists, devoid of any logic, DDoS'd the Ubisoft DRM servers thus preventing anyone who lawfully purchased the game from playing it. I believe this to be an imperative example of an adverse effect to noninfringing use of a copyrighted work.

    Unfortunately though, the reason why this is not exempted (or at least what I believe to be the reason) is because software is licensed and you don't actually own it. And, as per your license agreement, your right to play the game and/or install it can be retracted at any time.

    This sentiment is echoed in the iphone ruling. Though you can legally jailbreak your iphone Apple is still allowed to disable your iphone through updates if they want to (and they sure as hell will!).

    So basically Ubisoft (and everyone else like them) is well protected whilst giving a huge middle finger to their customers. Which is why I don't buy Ubisoft games anymore and I closely watch the DRM status of all the games I buy.

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