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Ivy Bridge IHS Removal - Question

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by Sasqui, Jan 4, 2013.

  1. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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  2. DarkOCean

    DarkOCean

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    Yes, but just replace the tim and put the ihs back since without it there's nothing to push the cpu against the pins. If you dont you must remove the retention bracket aswell and let the cooler touch the die directly and push it to against the pins.
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  3. cadaveca

    cadaveca My name is Dave

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    Exactly.


    Truly though, you could just scrape off the black stuff that adheres the IHS to the chip, replace IHS, using fresh paste of the same TIM that is there already, and notice the same gains.

    The problem just isn't the TIM, at all, it's the IHS and how the chip is assembled that is the source of "high temperatures". And perhaps this is truly why they chose to not use solder with these chips.
    Sasqui says thanks.
  4. Sasqui

    Sasqui

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    Wow, good point, the retention bracket indeed pushes against the IHS, holding the CPU down!

    Unless I have the burning urge, I think I'll leave it alone. The results of replacing the TIM alone didn't really seem worth it.
  5. cadaveca

    cadaveca My name is Dave

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    I agree. I have removed the IHS of my 3570k(long story about that one, I'll have to type it all out later), and there were some signifigant gains in "cooling", however, it didn't really affect OC one bit.


    If you aren't too happy with your CPU, you can always buy a Tuning Plan Warranty, and clock the bejesus out of your chip until it dies. :p

    http://click.intel.com/tuningplan/

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