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Ivy Bridge Temperatures Could Be Linked To TIM Inside Integrated Heatspreader: Report

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    Duh yes, exactly. I just want to see reports from regular users like us of their overclocking experiences with retail models. I'm holding out a tiny sliver of hope that production CPUs will use solder. Holding my breath! (slightly)
     
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  2. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    At this point, I'd say using paste instead of solder saves a little more than half a cent per chip. The solder requires special equipment, and and is more expensive than paste.

    Even if we say the savings is only say 1 cent per processor, Intel has shipped 75 Million+ Sandybridge processors, and likely will ship close to that number if not more Ivy Bridge processors. So that is a huge savings. One cent on 75 Million processors is $750,000. That is a nice chunk off the bottom line for a change that won't affect but maybe 10% of users.
     
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  3. PopcornMachine

    PopcornMachine

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    Uh, 750G is a drop in the bucket to Intel. If they are causing this much heat to save that amount, then they are just greedy beyond all understanding.

    But that is the way of the world today. Money, money, money.

    Common sense be damned.
     
  4. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    This much heat? It is a few degrees C, maybe 10 at most at stock speeds, where most of these will be run. And the temps aren't anywhere near worrysome. As the reviewers put it it is "slightly warmer than it should be". And not all of that comes down to the TIM, the higher thermal density plays a large role as well.
     
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  5. CaptainFailcon New Member

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    you can always remove the IHS you're self and run it naked :) just don't crush the die .....
     
  6. cadaveca

    cadaveca My name is Dave

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    I think perhaps the fact that the solder uses relatively rare minerals might play a role in them making this decision, which actually holds a lot more common sense than first meets the eye.
     
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  7. CaptainFailcon New Member

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    with all the flooding in east Asia you bet you're biscuits the price of neodymium is still though the roof
     
  8. cadaveca

    cadaveca My name is Dave

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    the socket retention mechanism relies on the IHS as a shim to have adequate pressure applied to the chip so that the pins touch properly. Running without the IHS isn't as easy as it sounds.
     
  9. PopcornMachine

    PopcornMachine

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    If "everyone" is saying it is "slightly" warmer, why are we talking about it?

    I know what I've read. We're not talking about stock speeds.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012
  10. NHKS

    NHKS New Member

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    probably indium based.. which, as u said is rare

    Wiki: "Indium is used as a thermal interface material in the form of pre-shaped foil sheets fitted between the heat-transfer surface of a microprocessor and its heat sink. The application of heat partially melts the foil and allows the indium metal to fill in any microscopic gaps and pits between the two surfaces, removing any insulating air pockets that would otherwise compromise heat transfer efficiency."

    Intel Patent(2010)-Methods of fabricating robust integrated heat spreader designs
     
  11. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    When Intel is making the decision, you better believe it is based on stock speed, regardless of what you are talking about. Their decisions have to be based on what the large majority of customers will experience, and since 90% of customers will run stock speeds, decisions have to be made based on stock speeds. What doesn't make sense is throwing away $750,000 just to cater to 10% of your market, and even then of that 10% of the market, maybe 10% will really care enough that the processor runs warmer that they won't buy it. How many people have you seen say "OMG, they run so much hotter, I'm not buying one!"?
     
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  12. PopcornMachine

    PopcornMachine

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    Why do you continue talking about it? There's no problem. It's only a few degrees. No one cares about overclockers.

    Personally, I am very happy to have my 2500K with proper thermal material in it. Even if it doesn't matter.
     
  13. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    Because you keep talking about it like it matters, I'm saying it doesn't.
     
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  14. PopcornMachine

    PopcornMachine

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    I will just have to agree to disagree then.

    It does in fact matter. Don't think people would have started this thread, or written articles about it if it didn't matter to at least a few people.

    If it doesn't matter to you, I can live with that. But I'm not going to agree with you.

    For the cost of the salary of a few overpaid executives, they cause what should be an easily overclockable chip to become a very hot chip.

    So I don't agree that it makes sense for them to do this.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012
  15. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    And it is still easily overclockable, reaching the same speeds as SandyBridge with significantly less voltage no less. Yes, it runs hotter, but it also has a higher thermal limit. And again, this isn't all due to the TIM, the higher thermal density plays a huge part.

    So, yes, if it saves them money and it doesn't affect the overwhelming majority of users, it makes perfect sense.
     
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  16. PopcornMachine

    PopcornMachine

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    Like I said, I can live with you being wrong.
     
  17. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    Except I'm not. And to answer your question about why someone made this thread if it doesn't matter, people bitch about stuff that doesn't matter all the time.
     
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  18. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    High-end BD encodes benefit greatly from OCing.

    But to be honest, if I'm not encoding, I just run at stock with the rad fans turned down for silence. I only load up my OC profile for heavy encoding anymore. Even my slower IPC 980x is more than enough for most tasks (including gaming @ 1920x1200) for me not to bother.

    You remove the metal socket retention mechanism and use a bolt through kit when you delid. The die sticks up past the actual socket once the bracket is removed.
     
  19. cadaveca

    cadaveca My name is Dave

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    I hear ya, but the pros tell me otherwise:

    I mean, I never say stuff like this unless it's been confirmed by those that know far more than I do!

    http://kingpincooling.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1730
     
  20. LAN_deRf_HA

    LAN_deRf_HA

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  21. TheMailMan78

    TheMailMan78 Big Member

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    Maybe they just use paste to save a buck as the Sandy Bridge is already over kill for 90% of applications today? Why waste the time/cash with solder on making something "cooler" when its already cool enough AND over powered for everything we pretty much throw at it? Sure I can hear them in board meetings now "Listen guys we have to add MILLIONS to our overhead in solder so less then 1% of our market can get a better score in 3DMark."
     
  22. phanbuey

    phanbuey

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  23. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    That's one hard bastard. :laugh:
     
  24. xenocide

    xenocide

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    A 2500K at 4.8GHz is roughly equal to a 4.4GHz 3570K in terms of performance, the only trade off is the 2500K uses noticably more power, requires higher Voltage, and runs maybe 5c colder. This is really a non-issue...
     
  25. Wile E

    Wile E Power User

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    I'm not seeing where it contradicts my statement. Though I don't know what ILM means. If it's like every other Intel I've seen, the pcb sits pretty flush with the socket itself, and the core sits above that. Hence, once you completely remove the metal retaining bracket and base (leaving only the bare socket), and bolt the cooler down, you get direct core contact.
     

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