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Let the electrons dance!

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by Drone, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. Drone

    Drone

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    WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - A team of Purdue University researchers is among a small group in the world that has successfully created ultrapure material that captures new states of matter and could have applications in high-speed quantum computing.

    Yay! Or maybe nay?

    Still long way to go ...

    -||-
    snip

    That's really cool. That's what they say. Let's see what's next:

    Arrrgh those nasty electrons!

    lolwut? I've stopped reading after that ...

    http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/research/2011/110727ManfraCsathyMBE.html
     
    qubit says thanks.
  2. twilyth Guest

    It sounds like they're talking about the Cooper pairs you have in superconducting materials. They don't actually communicate though - at least not as far as I can tell from the wiki entry. I've never read very much about the phenomenon and I've never heard of particles communicating except when entangled. Even there it's not clear that there is any actual communication - just some connection that transcends space (and possibly time - don't remember).

    edit: OK, never mind, they are talking about entangled electrons - I think that's what they mean by "correlated." The problem is keeping the entangled particles from interacting with any other particles or forces since that collapses the wave function of all of the entangled electrons and eliminates them as being useful for quantum computing.
     
  3. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    stopped reading. poster went crazy
     
  4. twilyth Guest

    I am indeed a few sammichs short of a picnic, but I'm a pillar of rationality compared to quantum mechanics. That is some crazy ass shit.

    New Type Of Entanglement Allows 'Teleportation in Time,' Say Physicists

    [​IMG]
    If anyone would like to 'splain this to us science geeks, please do. Try to use small words though. My brain hurts. :cool: :laugh:
     
  5. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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  6. twilyth Guest

  7. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    are you teasing me? I can help but get the feeling that you are somehow amused by the fact that its a tad hard for me to grasp how electrons can just lol time. though to be honest i didnt make it past AP physics i took all the genetics courses. im sure IRL me and you could have a fine conversation.
     
  8. twilyth Guest

    I don't understand. I was trying to give some additional info that I thought would be helpful - helpful to me as well. I don't have a science background except for being an avid reader of things like SciAm and Science News.

    I'm not trying to be a dick or anything, although I seem to have a knack for coming across that way.
     
  9. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    hahaha no no i didnt mean to insinuate that you were comming across as rude. I just thought you were playing a little.
     
  10. twilyth Guest

    No not at all.

    I put that parenthetical comment in because I've read about experiments that do seem to mess with the time line. They're all a little hazy though since a) they're not easy to understand in the first place and b) I need to see the same concept several times before it really sinks in.

    Then when you mentioned that it was a crazy idea, I was anxious to give an example. Not to prove you wrong or anything but just because I think it's so fascinating and I didn't want to pass up an opportunity to share.

    Honestly I had never heard of the experiment I quoted, but it seemed like a good example of entanglement ignoring time boundaries so I figured it was the perfect article to cite - even if it didn't and still doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

    I'm going to try to work through the Wired article though once I can focus a little bit. I'm pretty wired from sleeping all day so my mind is all over the place right now. :)
     
  11. Solaris17

    Solaris17 Creator Solaris Utility DVD

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    if you want a real mind boggle about time entanglement and quantum mechanics give this a quick read.

    http://www.physorg.com/news198948917.html

    the specific article talks about avoiding the grandfather paradox. but imagine if CTC's can be controlled without a time machine? then maybe the processors of the future wont have the migration or AB problem that was being discussed in the other thread.

    EDIT:: it actually covers very briefly particle tunneling at the end.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2011
  12. twilyth Guest

    Wow. Crazy coincidence. I actually read that article last year and it didn't mak any sense to me then either. I guess what they're trying to say is that you pre-select the states a particle would be able assume in the past so as to post-select only states that would not create a paradox. OK. That sorta makes sense but how do you pre-select a state in the present that would manifest the desired state in the past. that's where it breaks down for me and i'm just like 'damn, these guys are so far out of my league.'
     
  13. Drone

    Drone

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    No. Correlated motion got nothing to do with entanglement. They just forced electrons to behave smarter. But somehow it's confusing. I heard that electrons ignore classic laws anyway. Like one electron can go through two holes at the same time. However it's really interesting. GaAs crystal sounds more exciting than graphene.
     
  14. twilyth Guest

    Hmm. I guess I'll have to read it again. Normally quantum computing involves having multiple particles in a state of superposition. Each superposed particle being a qubit. I thought that they also had to be entangled but I guess I should check.
     
  15. Drone

    Drone

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    You can read an abstract of article about correlated motion of electrons here:

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0921453489911647

    And here are links about entanglement/spookiness

    http://www.davidjarvis.ca/entanglement/spookiness.shtml
    http://www.davidjarvis.ca/entanglement/quantum-entanglement.shtml
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...n-acts-at-10000-times-the-speed-of-light.html
     
  16. qubit

    qubit Overclocked quantum bit

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    Awesome first post. :D

    Yeah, see, us qubits are way way more powerful than you can ever imagine... muhahahaha! :laugh:

    And we can even transend time. How's that for a party trick?
     
  17. twilyth Guest

    I do understand the concepts and the 2nd and 3rd links were very interesting. I'm going to bookmark that whole series. I'm especially interested because apparently entanglement depends on interaction with the zero point field - at least I read that someplace and I think that makes it even more fascinating.

    Anyway, I figured that both superposition and entanglement were required for quantum computing - especially since entanglement is a special form of superposition.

    The first link made no sense to me at all. Do you know how this type of correlated movement is different from Cooper pairs or is that something entirely different?
     
  18. Drone

    Drone

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    Cooper pairs got to do with superconductivity and BCS theory (if my memory serves me correctly) when coupled electrons can act as a boson and condense into the ground state. In my opening post article they didn't talk about this effect. They got ultra-pure GaAs crystal (it's a semiconductor just like Si or Ge) with a bunch of electrons with hyper high mobility which move in 2D space. In my opinion these two effects look different to me (tho both of them require ultra low temperatures). This subject is really wide and complex, the more research the better.

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/solids/coop.html#c2

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hframe.html
    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/quacon.html#quacon
    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/solids/supcon.html#c1
     
  19. Drone

    Drone

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    Mmm I took my time and read that article (with a big headache I admit). So they say that if you sent a qubit in past and detect it in future then this "cause-effect" thingy can be called time entanglement (if I got that right lol *shrug*). However they didn't say a single thing about the speed of that process....

    Really I dunno ... after reading all of that now I start to think that either time is space's girlfriend or time doesn't exist at all. If everything (always) moves in space then it automatically moves in time. And if speed is very high (close to speed of light) then time slows down. Hmmm so if I want to stop time for some system then I either need to completely freeze all its particles or to accelerate it to the speed of light?! Ok I digress ...

    I found a really interesting book Electron Scattering and it has a chapter called Quantum Time Entanglement of Electrons:

    http://www.springerlink.com/content/m275684qkr33409x/

    Btw this book also talks about correlation and entanglement:

    Go figure ...
     
  20. Drone

    Drone

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    Scientists entangled ions using microwaves

    Here's their ... rig

    [​IMG]

    Microwaves are the key!

    ... and entangled ions too.

    yeah and also video encoding and gaming I suppose ....

    The sooner I forget about 1s and 0s and start thinking about rotations and entaglement the better.

    Well done, NIST.

    http://www.nist.gov/pml/div688/microwave-quantum-081011.cfm
     
  21. Drone

    Drone

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    http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-01-choreographing-electrons-pursuit-quantum.html

    Bump. Another interesting read:

    Managing billions of spinning electrons

    [​IMG]

    The highly purified sample of silicon-28 has a very low magnetic signature at the atomic level, and therefore does not disrupt the spin of the electrons.



    edit: November 16, 2012

    Sounds cool

    The process is complex and tricky

    http://phys.org/news/2012-11-entangle-electron-photon-quantum-dot.html
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2012
  22. Drone

    Drone

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    We're one step closer to ... quantum cryptography.

    Sounds promising. Because quantum information is useful but very fragile and normal amplification techniques destroy it. The key feature of photon amplifier is that it preserves the quantum information and may help overcome the current distance limitations of quantum communication.

    http://phys.org/news/2012-11-noiseless-photon-amplifier.html

    Cool amplifier. I want one or two. Distance can eff off :D
     
  23. Drone

    Drone

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    Now it's not just electrons or photons. For the first time it's entire atomic ensembles!

    [​IMG]

    One step closer to quantum memories.

    So it's collective teleportation. Sounds cool.

    Sounds easy but it's complicated.

    http://phys.org/news/2012-11-quantum-teleportation-atomic-ensembles.html
     

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