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LGA-1156 CPU and Motherboard US Pricing Surfaces

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Sep 7, 2009.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Ahead of a formal launch, pricing of socket LGA-1156 processors, an untimely leak from Newegg.com that was updating its site, spilled pricing details of a broad range of socket LGA-1156 processors and motherboards. These prices give us an indication of what prices will finally look like, in the US market, and more or less match speculated prices doing rounds for quite some time now.

    To begin with, Intel Core i5 750, Core i7 models 860 and 870 are priced at $209.99, $299.99, and $579, respectively, close to the 1000 unit prices that surfaced weeks ahead. At $209.99, the 2.66 GHz Core i5 750 will be highly competitive with AMD's Phenom II X4 BE offerings in that price range. The 2.80 GHz Core i7 860 is expected to perform on par, or better than the Core i7 920, while being priced a notch higher. The Core i7 870 2.93 GHz only holds premium value at $579, since it ends up being the fastest socket LGA-1156 processor money can buy.

    On the motherboards front, there are three clear sub-divisions seen, to denote motherboards with a particular kind of feature-set. There's a sub-$150 group that is characterized by basic features the platform provides, with one or two PCI-E x16 slots (with usual lane arrangement of x16, x4). Notable products in the group include MSI P55-CD53 ($119.99), ASUS P7P55D LE ($134.99), Gigabyte P55-UD3R ($139.99), and Biostar TP55 ($119.99). Products in the next group are priced between $150 and $200, and offer mid-range features including two or rarely three PCI-Express slots (usually x8, x8, x4 (if available)), and better overclocking features. Notable products include MSI P55-GD65 ($159.99), ASUS P7P55D EVO ($194.99), ASUS P7P55D Pro ($169.99), Gigabyte P55-UD4P ($169.99), Biostar TPower i55 ($184.99), and EVGA 123-LF-E655-KR (169.99). Finally, the >$200 segment is where the premium fun starts, with high-end, overclocker-grade, or simply feature-packed products. Notable ones include ASUS Maximus III Formula ($249.99), Gigabyte P55-UD6 ($249.99), and EVGA P55 FTW ($229.99). These boards may include three or more PCI-E slots. Some of these up the order could even feature additional PCI-E bridge chips for better interconnect bandwidth.

    The so-advertised "P55-compatible" DDR3 memory kits have also made it, and are fairly on-par with standard prices. Manufacturers dropped in some heatspreader/cooler, density, and speed innovations to bring up premium SKUs. The new lineup of processors and compatible motherboards will be made available in this week.
  2. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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  3. toyo New Member

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    279$ for 0,13 GHZ? Now that's indeed a price PREMIUM. How stupid can you be to buy one of these i7 870...
  4. HalfAHertz

    HalfAHertz

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    I think that it offered advanced turbo mode or sth...with higher max values or had HT unlike the 2,66GHz one. Or it could just be a higher binned/lower leakedge part
  5. toyo New Member

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    i7 800 series have the same specs. The Turbo mode is 3,6 GHz vs 3,46 GHz though. So, who will pay 279$ for 0.13 GHz in Normal and 0.14 GHz in Turbo...
  6. thezorro

    thezorro New Member

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    wow intel is a mess.
    lynfield was supposed to be cheap but is really expensive.
    what is intel thinking? if lynnfield is a crippled core i7.

    just my two cents.
  7. VIPER

    VIPER

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  8. toyo New Member

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    Lots of OC results on non-released CPUs. Yeah, ok, for OC freaks that go LN2 and helium and whatever other ultra-extra OC method. But for those that OC on air... and those are 90% if not more, both i7 800 will provide.
    I understand the i7 870 is indeed higher binned and see your point, but even so, buying one will not guarantee better OC then i7 860. I still maintain my opinion that Intel is pretty much beginning to capitalize on Nehalem's success and bring the prices to not-justifiable limits. I remember AMD did the same with their Athlons... omg, first 1GHz CPU... let's make it 1000$ and proceed just like Intel.
  9. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

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    Well AMD's justification back in the day was it was THE FIRST. All processors that break new ground or hold the title of "Processor Supreme" (Sorry I just watch Dr. Strange movie again) are about $1000.

    These should only be the flagship processors. The king of the montain for the 1156 socket. The cost effective and lower priced chips will follow soon. All of these are quads too, so expect to see some dual core variations of the 1156 in the next month or so.
  10. Fishymachine New Member

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    All i7 (including 8xx which don't have tri-channel ) have hyper-threading(have 40% gain over normal quad's,i5 and PII X4) but the i5 is now way competitive against X4(anyway a X4 945 with a 790GX are 60-70$/E cheaper and at least as performant)
  11. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

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    hyper-threading is more of a 20% gain, not 40%. The i7 out performs the PII, but not by 40%.
  12. Fishymachine New Member

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    That depends on application,in apps that support 8 threads it is 40% over C2Q/PII,but in games and quad only optimized apps C2Q=PII X4=i7=i5~Athlon X4
  13. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

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    While it is true it does depend on the application. From what I remember from the various comparisons, the only programs that yield a 40% improvement over a similarly price AMD PII are occasional synthetic benchmarks, which mean nothing. I don't trust or count synthetic benchmarks cause it has never accurately displayed Real World figures.

    And before you say, "But when they are at the same clock speed", while that argument is perfectly valid, the change in clock speed will void the warrant and change the Thermal Power of the CPU. Not to mention you would then be comparing an OC'ed product to a stock one.

    Real World, i7 in price range, better, but not 40% better.

    http://www.legionhardware.com/document.php?id=825&p=5

    http://www.hardcoreware.net/amd-phenom-ii-x4-955-black-edition-review/6/
  14. Richieb0y

    Richieb0y New Member

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    lol here they sell the mobos 1156 but i cant order a 1156
  15. Fishymachine New Member

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  16. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    they sell them (and many stores have stock) here in Au for a week or two now
  17. tigger

    tigger I'm the only one

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    There is a few uk sites that have them up now.

    Prices are ok too for a change.
  18. jmcslob

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    What's gonna happen with lga1366...this is why i went to AMD cause intel's sockets change to much,cost to much to keep up with the platform then dies to soon. I hope this 1156 hangs around for awhile, looks worth checking out
  19. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

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    This is not a move. 1366 will still be the socket for i7 and i9. Only the i5 and I think the i3 will use 1156. The only one at risk of being killed off in the next year IMO is LGA 775. Once i3 and i5 fillout the $40 to $200 price range, LGA 775 will be pointless and killed off.
    jmcslob says thanks.
  20. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    i7 is also available on 1156
    jmcslob says thanks.
  21. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

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    Yeah, I just read like 5 reviews and saw the i7 800 series. Didn't see that before. Thanks for the heads up though.

    Now I have to redesign my friends rig with an i5 750 because it now has the bang for your buck title. Thus putting AMD in a really bad position again. They need to do something unique and stunning real soon or they are going to lose the little ground they have made up thus far.

    P.S. The i7 800 series should not have been named thus because it is a 1156 chip. This will create marketing and ad confusion. Now we have two differet sets of i7 processors with different sockets, different memory control systems, etc. They should have named it i6 or something. They are killing the point of the "i" naming system. Why make things "simply" to only mess it all up again.
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2009
  22. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    the i series denotes how many cores/threads it has.

    i3 = dual core
    i5 = quad core, no HT
    i7 = quad core w/ HT
    i9 = six cores - with or without HT i dont know

    each i series has a different number of threads, as far as i can tell. correct me if i'm wrong.

    the boxes for the CPU's clearly state which socket they're for, so retail confusion will be limited.

    TheLaughingMan says thanks.
  23. TheLaughingMan

    TheLaughingMan

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    You are indeed, as usual, correct. I don't expect retailers to be confused. I expect noobs and people who think they are power users to be confused. While this may all seem simple to you, me, and 90% of the people who read these forums, we are the minority. So for that strange group of people who don't buy prebuild systems, but don't do their homework, I expect issues.

    I can guarantee you guys and TPU get a bunch of questions related to the different between i5, i7, and i7 800 vs. 900, but I guess that is kinda the point huh.
  24. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    simple? hell, it seems like a total pain in the arse to me. i had to put some research in to make sense of it myself.

    Dont see why i5 and i7 couldnt have been the platforms, and HT CPU's only be released on "i7" (aka 1336)
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2009
  25. johnnyfiive

    johnnyfiive

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    1366 is for workstations/hardcore enthusiasts. Thats why it costs more and thats why Gulftown is going to be socket 1366 compatible, 6 core with HT. Socket 1156 is marketed at budget enthusiasts and also to replace socket 775. Due to the dual channel memory controller and integrated PCI-E controller, the pin out was much smaller, so 1156 it is.

    It's all explained well right here: http://www.anandtech.com/cpuchipsets/showdoc.aspx?i=3634

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