1. Welcome to TechPowerUp Forums, Guest! Please check out our forum guidelines for info related to our community.

Monkeys in Fukushima Start Showing Signs of Radiation Exposure

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by micropage7, Aug 7, 2014.

  1. micropage7

    micropage7

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Messages:
    6,437 (3.51/day)
    Thanks Received:
    1,519
    Location:
    Jakarta, Indonesia
    Wild monkeys that live
    in Fukushima forest, Japan, close to the nuclear
    meltdown, have started to change. Based on the
    research of University of South Carolina, the
    United States, the number of blood cells of these
    monkeys has started to decrease. As a result,
    they are vulnerable to infectious diseases.
    Researchers found signs of radiation exposure on
    61 monkeys that live 70-kilometre away from the
    nuclear plantation in Fukushima Daiichi. The
    result, their white and red blood cells have
    dropped compared to healthy monkeys in
    Shimokita.

    "The low blood cell counts could be a sign of a
    compromised immune system and could
    potentially make the monkeys vulnerable to
    infectious diseases," said Shinichi Hayama, head
    of the research, as reported by Live Science, last
    Thursday.
    Another researcher, Tim Mousseau, uttered that if
    it could happen to monkeys, these dangerous
    signs offer similar possibility of occurring to
    humans.
    However, monkeys have higher level of radiation
    than what they have found in humans in the same
    location. This is because monkeys consume fruit,
    mushrooms or insects that have been
    contaminated; on the other hand, humans are
    more 'selective'.







    http://en.tempo.co/read/news/2014/0...ima-Start-Showing-Signs-of-Radiation-Exposure
     
  2. umarsahb New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2015
    Messages:
    1 (0.05/day)
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Wild monkeys that live
    in Fukushima forest, Japan, close to the nuclear
    meltdown, have started to change. Based on the
    research of University of South Carolina, the
    United States, the number of blood cells of these
    monkeys has started to decrease. As a result,
    they are vulnerable to infectious diseases.
     
  3. Toothless

    Toothless

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Messages:
    1,690 (4.56/day)
    Thanks Received:
    980
    Location:
    Island of Berk
    Good job copy/pasting what you read.
     
    Crunching for Team TPU

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guest)

Share This Page