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multiplier or fsb

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by bassmasta, Oct 2, 2007.

  1. bassmasta Guest

    i noticed that the 5000 black box is doing pretty good because of an unlocked multiplier. i thought that a high multiplier was worse for your OC untill memory started to keep you back. i thought that was the whole point behind 2000 fsb
     
  2. hat

    hat Enthusiast

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    You don't have 2000 FSB. If I had 2000 FSB, my CPU would be running at 26GHz (I wish!! :laugh:)

    Your HT link is 1000, the link with the rest of the system, and it is double-pumped, therefore they come up with the 2000MHz HT link thing. Just like DDR800 isn't 800MHz as many people say. If thier RAM was really 800MHz, it would be DDR1600. DDR800 = 400MHz.
     
    Crunching for Team TPU
  3. kwchang007

    kwchang007 New Member

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    Err the right combo of multiplier, memory dividers, and fsb really gets the oc working as hard as possible. Some mobos actually have a hole where if you hit that fsb, the performance drops because it loosens it's latencies.
     
  4. bassmasta Guest

    o >.> well, while i'm at it, can heat make an oc unstable or just kill hardware?
     
  5. kwchang007

    kwchang007 New Member

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    Both.
     
  6. tigger

    tigger I'm the only one

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    i think both,but i'm not 100%
     
  7. bassmasta Guest

    well, this has been an educational twenty minutes. i was wondering why i had such horrid instability at 68/59 degrees
     
  8. hat

    hat Enthusiast

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    ^^lol
    72C is the melting point for an Athlon :nutkick:
     
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  9. bassmasta Guest

    yep. that's why i keep it at a nice, cool 68/ next voltage increment spells death, tho.
     
  10. hat

    hat Enthusiast

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    I wouldn't consider 68c anywhere near cool. My old P4 PrescHOT only ran 54c on the stock cooler.
     
    Crunching for Team TPU
  11. bassmasta Guest

    well, if it doesn't cause damage, it's cool enough for my needs :) i've brought it up to 71 degrees before, too. i think the melting point is 74
     
  12. pbmaster

    pbmaster New Member

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    The performance loss you're seeing may actually be heat damage...I feel sorry for that CPU LOL
     
  13. KennyT772

    KennyT772 New Member

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    You don't want athlons running above 65c load for any amount of time. You need to either increase the cooling capacity or lower your overclock...or you WILL have dead hardware.
     
  14. bassmasta Guest

    :) i'm one of those people who gets their limitations in writing and abuses whatever leeway we can get. that's military training. so, core 1 at 58, core 2 at 68. actually, now that i see heat is causing instability, i'll have to rethink that. in case i destroy something, i can get an fx-64 for under $100 from a friend of mine.
     

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