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NanoCoolers puts liquid metal in your PC

Discussion in 'News' started by W1zzard, May 4, 2005.

  1. W1zzard

    W1zzard Administrator Staff Member

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    Most of you may not have heard of NanoCoolers yet. This company is a relatively young Startup(May 2002) who has been working on improving cooling technologies behind closed doors for quite some time.

    Now the first details on their cool new products emerge:

    We got our hands on a 16 page confidential presentation:

    [​IMG]

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    Last edited: May 4, 2005
  2. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    i want one :D
  3. gR3iF

    gR3iF New Member

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    hm lol :D lets wait what they ca do
  4. pixxi Guest

    Looks like 16 pages to me....
  5. gR3iF

    gR3iF New Member

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    :D nice try but its a good way to offer a cooler and makes me feel nervous (wanna have it)
  6. wazzledoozle

    wazzledoozle New Member

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    This is the type of cooling they use to cool the cores of nuclear reactors :D

    I heard that the liquid metal will break down whatever it is held in rather quickly though.
  7. gR3iF

    gR3iF New Member

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    :D my pc is an atomic reactor
  8. 15th Warlock

    15th Warlock

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    Though liquid sodium has been used in some experimental fast breeder nuclear reactors, most common nuclear reactors use plain water to cool them down, which is much less complicated to implement on that scale than liquid metal is.
    I think these coolers might be using something far less complicated, something like mercury perhaps?
  9. Tieros Guest

    It ain't mercury :)
  10. 15th Warlock

    15th Warlock

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    Gallium perhaps?
  11. Unregistered Guest

    Gallium is feasable except it's expensive. But with melting tempearature around 32C is is feasable. I do not know the thermal capacity of gallium but I have used it a lot while working with MBE.
  12. 15th Warlock

    15th Warlock

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    In my University we were investigating the possible uses of Gallium (and Indium as well) as substitutes for mercury in tooth silver amalgam fillings, but costs were, as you say, too high, even though both metals are totally biologic friendly.
    Anyway, I guess these new coolers would use very small amounts of any metal, and I guess will be very expensive and to be used only by enthusiasts, willing to pay the premium for metal cooling.
    I cannot think of any other liquid metal to use :confused:
  13. Unregistered Guest

    What the...

    "boiling point of the material is in excess of 2000°C"

    Some new metal salvaged from the wreakage of UFO's at area 51 and our recent trips to mars have paid off. Anyone know what it is?
  14. Unregistered Guest

  15. 15th Warlock

    15th Warlock

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    Twice the strenght of titanium alloys! :eek:
  16. Unregistered Guest

    electromagnetic pumps ... inside your case ... with hard drives
  17. Unregistered Guest

    The aptly named "new refrigeration" technology bears a striking resemblance to peltiers.

    If they can find a way to actually make peltiers both energy efficient and feasable (most peltier cooling setups require an extraordinary amount of effort to cool the hot side) then I think that it would pay for itself.
  18. Unregistered Guest

  19. Unregistered Guest

    Its an alloy

    I suspect their using an alloy of gallium. 85% Gallium plus 15% tin reduces the melting point to around 20 degrees celcius (from 30 degrees celcius for gallium.). 95% gallium,5% zinc has a melting point of 25 degrees. May be there are other additives I haven't thought of.
    It's likely to be expensive with gallium around $220 US dollar/100grams (correct me if I'm wrong). I am also aware of research into gallium as a coolant.

    Glenn (trust me I'm wearing a white dust coat).
  20. Unregistered Guest

    i just piss on mine ;-]
  21. Unregistered Guest

    oughta pull plug first ;o)!
  22. Unregistered Guest

    DumbA$$'s

    Read the posted article the metals not suppost to melt its a more heat absorbent metal... And I quote: "Unlike water, the metal boils at 2000°C, which means it can absorb more heat without changing phase and becoming a troublesome gas.". Last time I checked AMD and Intel both said that their their CPUS would go after 150-180°C. If you have proof that says your CPU hits higher then maybe I will retract my coment.
  23. 15th Warlock

    15th Warlock

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    Next time you're going to call ppl names, get your facts straight, 'cause right now, the above statement makes a 4th grader look ten times as smart as you are...
    Have you ever heard of Mercury? it's a liquid metal at room temperature, it's what's inside those old glass things your mom used to put in your mouth (and in other places... :p ) to meassure your temperature. Does the word thermometer ring a bell?
    Now, Gallium on the other hand melts at aprox. 29.76°C, well under the idle temp of that thing called CPU inside your PC, but of course you've never heard of gallium before, have you? :confused:
    Now, boiling, put in layman terms, means turning any material into gasseus state, (meaning it is not liquid or solid anymore) so, as you kindly pointed out before:
    "Unlike water, the metal boils at 2000°C, which means it can absorb more heat without changing phase and becoming a troublesome gas."
    Let me translate that last paragraph to you, this means that this specific liquid metal (or alloy) won't turn into gasseus state unless it hits 2000°C, which is about 20 times over the boiling point of water (aprox 100°C depending on the altitude), did you get that, sport?
    Last edited: May 11, 2005
  24. avatar_of_woe Guest

    :p

    whatever it tries to cool it will break down sooner than an overclocked p4 aircooled.i think that watercooled now its the perfect sollusion...even the watercolled processors and graphic cards have some problems...imagine the nanocooled...anyway i am happy with my watercooled system cya
  25. Unregistered Guest

    most of the systems use gallium but some also use iridium...im almost sure none of them use mercury though

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