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Need a new router

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by hat, Jul 29, 2009.

  1. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Ah, usually a network server has only two NICs (one WAN, one LAN) with a managed or unmanaged switch on the LAN. A router is basically three things: an internet gateway, packet routing, firewall, and switch. YoI assume you already got the internet gateway and packet routing parts covered using software and I imagine you are looking into the firewall aspects (or Windows Firewall). The switch as you suggested, could mean additional NICs in the computer or a managed/unmanaged external switch. I would always recommend the external switch because they are cheap, simple, and effective.

    I've been using this one for at least a year now and it is awesome (albeit hot):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833129025


    The real disadvantage of what you are aiming for is that it will require a lot of micromanagement. If you don't have software that can act as a DHCP, you'll have to manually assign IP addresses for all NICs. Additionally, your software will probably need to be PPPoE capable in order to interface with your modem/bridge (depends on your Internet connection). If not PPPoE, you'll have to interface with the modem through a default gateway IP.

    ICS (the page is old) should be able to handle DHCP.


    What really gets me is that a good switch costs about as much as a decent router. You only need to share the connection with three computers which is what all decent routers support (less the headaches). If I were in your shoes, I'd go with a router DMZing the server if absolutely necessary (make sure it has a firewall enabled if you do).


    Consider this (or the router you originally suggested):
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833127241

    Just don't use the disk that comes with any router--they be worthless and create more problems than they fix.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2009
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  2. mrhuggles

    mrhuggles

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    lmfao, assigning ips is a chore? ugh you guys are going crazy, thats just all there is to it.

    ever tried clocking yourself setting a static ip?
     
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  3. FelipeV

    FelipeV New Member

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    Using the P3 and some kind of program like MikroTik wouldn´t be a solution too ?
     
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  4. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    Manually assigning IP adresses... I do that already. I have to. I can't expect to host a Quake server with 2 computers and auto IP assigning. What if I have it forwarded to 192.168.1.100 and my mom's pc got that address and I was put on .101? Wouldn't work too well :laugh:
     
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  5. mrhuggles

    mrhuggles

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    forgive me if you already said so but i couldn't find it... which quake are you hosting a server for?
     
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  6. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    My server is a DNS so it has a static, dedicated IP (reserved in the router as well). All the other computers/printers are on DHCP. Even computers on DHCP, I've never had a problem of computers changing IP addresses. The potential obviously exists but in almost 10 years of using D-Link routers, it has never happened.


    It takes less than one second for the router assign it an IP. Obviously it takes much longer to not only set a static IP on the machine but also reserve it in the router so DHCP doesn't try to use it. There's no comparison.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2009
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  7. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    3 NICs won't work. You have to use a hub or switch. Trust me.

    One of the good things about going with a router like the WRT54GL is that you can set up static DHCP address, so certain computers will always get certain IPs. No need to manually set IPs.
     
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  8. mrhuggles

    mrhuggles

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    lol, no need to reserve them, DHCP will already be configured to use ips 100 and above, if you want a device to have a static ip and not worry about that set it to something low
     
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  9. newtekie1

    newtekie1 Semi-Retired Folder

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    Yes, you can do it this way. Having the router handle static DHCP IPs, instead of manually setting them is much better. At least it is for me, as I want all my computers inside my network to always have the same IPs. However, when I take my laptops out and try to connect them to another network, my manual IPs almost never worked. So it became a real pain to keep manually setting the IP and then disabling it when moving my laptops.

    With the router handling static DHCP, when my laptops are connected to my network, they get the proper IP that I want them to have. When I take them with me somewhere else, I don't have to worry about it not working.
     
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  10. hat

    hat Maximum Overclocker

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    The origional :rockout:

    I have no need for DHCP, really, I don't take my computer anywhere. Ever.
     
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  11. mrhuggles

    mrhuggles

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    yeah besides its like i just said, its standard practice [default] for the first 100 ips to not be used by DHCP for home networks

    plus you can have 2 configurations anyways
     
  12. FordGT90Concept

    FordGT90Concept "I go fast!1!11!1!"

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    Every router (mostly manufacturer dependent) has he DHCP range set differently. For instance...

    D-Link IP: 192.168.0.1
    DHCP Range: 192.168.0.100-192.168.0.199

    Netopia IP: 192.168.1.254
    DHCP Range: 192.168.1.0-192.168.1.99

    You can usually change the range in the device configuration.
     
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