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New Microtransmitter Can Oscillate in FIR Band, Promises Dozens of Gbps of Bandwidth

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Nov 24, 2011.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Japanese firm ROHM, in partnership with Osaka University, unveiled a new, afforable terahertz-range radio transmitter. To achieve terahertz frequencies, the transmitter should oscillate 1,000,000,000,000 (1 trillion) times per second. At that rate, one can't really dub that "radio" frequency, because it enters what is known as "far infrared" (FIR) band, which is relatively unexplored by science so far, due to limitations in technologies (transmitters) that can accurately oscillate at a set frequency in that band.

    What does it mean for us? To begin with, if ROHM's transmitter is able to strike an affordable price like it's designed to, it will exponentially increase data bandwidths offered by today's wireless networking technologies. A tiny transmitter developed by ROHM, measuring 1.5 x 3 mm, which uses resonant tunnelling diode technology, is already able to oscillate at 300 GHz (0.3 THz), achieving the ability to transmit 1.5 Gbps (192 MB/s). The people behind this transmitter believe that using the technology they developed, they should be able to scale up bandwidths to 30 Gbps in the future. The FIR band is relatively free, and less complex modulation sequences will be required, facilitating low-power transmission.

    [​IMG]

    Source: Hexus.net
     
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  2. twilyth Guest

    I know infrared can penetrate some materials to some extent. I wonder if the transmission characteristics are more IR-like or more RF-like.
     
  3. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    It's RF-like (no line of sight needed).

    IR-like (consumer IR) is a wireless communication that uses blinking of infrared LEDs to transmit data (like using a flashlight to tell something to your neighbour using morse code). It doesn't benefit from any of the characteristics of IR light. The amount of data you can transmit is limited by the number of times that IR LED can blink.

    Whereas FIR transmission is like radio transmission, its frequencies are in the ranges of IR, and hence more data is transported per second.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2011
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  4. Lionheart

    Lionheart

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    I just saw 300Ghz and creamed my pants ^_^, I', too lazy to read the rest --_-- zzZ
     
  5. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    How about the fact that 1 terahertz is 1000 GHz?
     
  6. twilyth Guest

    Yeah, I'm pretty familiar with consumer IR. It's normally in the high 600 or low 700 nm range. PIRs go out to 14k nm (14 microns).

    I looked this up though and far infrared starts at 15 microns and goes out to 1000 microns. 1000 translates to about 300ghz. So if wikipedia is right, there's a typo someplace. I know, big if.
     
  7. ariff_tech New Member

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    yeah, mee too:rockout::rockout:

    1THz, WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!! I though this is impossible before...
    This is only oscillator, right.
    What about the antenna, the frontend circuit, the tuner etc???
     
  8. zAAm

    zAAm

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    What typo?

    The far IR range according to wikipedia is between (1000 microns) 300 GHz and 20 THz (15 microns). So this technology would fall just inside that definition.
     
  9. twilyth Guest

    Ah. 1000ghz is 300 microns. Forgot it's an inverse relationship. So on a linear scale, I guess that would make it closer to long IR than radio.
     
  10. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    and wireless tech finally gets a real kick in the pants speed wise.
     
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  11. Completely Bonkers New Member

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    Just to remind everyone... this is for SHORT RANGE wireless only. You won't be going though wall partitions with this. Nonetheless, great! Fantastic in-room data streaming to your handheld device.
     
  12. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    wireless hard drives/flash drives will be quite a nice option.
     
  13. AsRock

    AsRock TPU addict

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    Bluetooth needs no line of sight ( although only tried it for 20 feet lol ), or is that not able to transfer high amounts of data ?.
     
  14. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Bluetooth is a radio data transmission protocol, it uses transceivers that oscillate in the range of 2402-2480 MHz.

    This new technology being worked on operates in 300 GHz ~ 20,000 GHz (FIR band).
     
  15. laszlo

    laszlo

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    higher freqv. iradiation for us i love it;effects none?
     
  16. econiii New Member

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    This stuff is way over my head..... Literally!


    I'm gonna make myself an aluminum hat!!
     
  17. AsRock

    AsRock TPU addict

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    But my point is in the every day house i can use my PS3 remove or controller from the other side of the house though all the walls.

    So is bandwidth limited with blutooth or could it be good enough for usage for actual networks ?.
     
  18. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    bluetooth is slow as crap for networking. last time i tried it was about 200KB/s - it wasnt even fast enough to use my phone as a dial up 3G modem.
     
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  19. AsRock

    AsRock TPU addict

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    aah ok, was just curious as the remote never fails to do what it's told any were in the house lol.

    Shame though i guess sony be on some thing else soon to solve that huh.
     
  20. Mussels

    Mussels Moderprator Staff Member

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    remotes are low bandwidth. i quite like the BT remote for my PS3
     
  21. mediasorcerer New Member

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    Hmm, i wonder if there is consideration for the potential health risks of these fir waves, they could cause harm or disruption to biological entities and the like?
     
  22. Fx

    Fx

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    this sounds great. the wireless space definitely needs revamped
     

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