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Nexus Technology Announces VCT-9000 CPU Cooler

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Nexus announces the VCT-9000 CPU cooler. The Nexus VCT-9000 cooler combines some of the most advanced technologies in the market used for CPU coolers: heat pipes directly on the CPU core, SkiveTek and 3 types of ultra-thin fins combined with a real silent PWM controlled 12cm fan at a 25 degree angle. This type op performance has never been this quiet before.

    The 120mm fan is PWM controlled and the speed varies between an utterly low 500 and 1600 RPM creating the lowest possible noise-output. Further more the fan is fitted with for blue LED's. The 5 heatpipes - one of 8mm and four of 6mm diameter - are fitted using the advanced Heatpipe-On-Core technology to guarantee the fastest heat dissipation possible.

    [​IMG]

    The Nexus VCT-9000 has 3 different shape aluminium fins. The bottom section of the fins has a characteristic V-shape. This V-shape allows the air flow generated by the 12cm fan to reach the target area on top of the CPU core for effective cooling. When you compare this solution with side-blowing cpu coolers in the market you notice that this area is not touched by the airflow of most of these models. A clear advantage for the VCT-9000 compared to side-blowers.

    The Nexus VCT-9000 is equipped with five heatpipes. The center heatpipe which is directly on the middle of the CPU is 8mm in diameter and provides massive cooling for the heart of the CPU. On either side of the 8mm heatpipe there are two highly efficient 6mm heatpipes. Heatpipe technology is the most effective way to quickly transport heat from one side to another. By placing the heatpipes directly on the core of the CPU you make use of this benefit in the most effective way. Heat is absorbed directly from the CPU core.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Many coolers in the market have a baseplate on which the heatpipes are positions. Then there is a baseplate between the heatpipes and the CPU core. This inevitably causes loss of disipation and loss of performance.
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2010
  2. Arrakis+9

    Arrakis+9

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    Seems like a different idea, if its as quiet as they say it is then this could be potentially awesome cooler although instead of doing hdt i wish they would of done a very thin copper base plate so theres no gaps
  3. ShinyG

    ShinyG New Member

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    Nice to see something a bit different. I'm looking forward to a head to head with contemporary coolers.
  4. gvblake22

    gvblake22

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    With the fins being off-center like that, it would be fun to mod onto a video card GPU!
  5. Arrakis+9

    Arrakis+9

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    every time i think of that i think of brutos the barbatos beefcake cooler :laugh:
  6. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    Oooh looks rather pretty at the very least, can't wait for reviews.
  7. halfwaythere New Member

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    Thats the biggest pile of horse manure a press release could lay. There is not one single serious test that shows hdt technology to be superior to regular one because it just isn't. The solid base ensures a much more uniform medium for heat to dissipate compared to hdt where only a couple of heatpipes actually are in contact with the cpu die.

    Sure it might work fine on lower tdp chips but its gonna fail so badly on hotter ones. Why can't they write something like: 'look how pretty it is who cares about performance', and be done with it. And being Nexus its going to be pretty expensive.
  8. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    Unfortunately you are wrong, unless its a very well made cooler ( thermalright etc) then having a base is less effective as each gap reduces thermal efficiency.

    ( where as thermal right put grooves through the base plate so the pipes are get 360 degree contact point to absorb heat)


    This way is cheaper to manufacture , consider the Xigamatek 1283, costs about 20-25 pounds here and on average not that far off true 120 X cooling.
    WarEagleAU says thanks.
  9. theonedub

    theonedub habe fidem

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    pushpins?!
    Crunching for Team TPU
  10. FreedomEclipse

    FreedomEclipse ~Technological Technocrat~

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    my thoughts exactly - this cooler looks like it will be another PITA to install.

    Im sick of having to deal with pushpin systems on oversized tower coolers. If manufacturers listened to intently to the consumers about what they want in a cooler. then why are pushpins still a viable option??

    Listen bub - If im willing to fork out for a 3rd party cooler then id also be willing to pay a few quid more for a backplate for installation none of this 'easy-way-out' pushpin bollocks.
  11. halfwaythere New Member

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    The only solid argument for hdt is price. But even than if you search well you can find non-hdt alternatives priced similarly.

    I'm not sure what coolers are you talking about that don't have grooves inside the baseplate beside Scythe which btw offers great value for money.

    Don't mistake a marketing gimmick with something that really works. And a decent hdt heatsink, ie Thors hammer, is not very cheap:

    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/coolers/display/alpenfoehn-nordwand_7.html
  12. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    If the push pins are well made they're fine, its only when you get the shitty stiff ones that you need to apply over 9000! units of newton force in order to get the pins through that are shite balls XD

    *edit*





    At guy above, my xig 1283 beat my true 120 x by 5 c under-load on the CPU in my system specs same case but no water-cooling obviously :p


    its all about choosing the right fans for the right heatsink.

    For example the cooler you metnioned ( thors hammer) would probably benefit from high pressure fans such as Scyth gentle typhoon.



    Thermal-rights coolers are over rated and not worth the pennies in my opinion ( only got mine as it was second hand)
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2010
  13. WarEagleAU

    WarEagleAU Bird of Prey

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    Exactly panther. Sure it has gaps, but with the heat hitting the heatpipes directly, there is no convection or loss of heat or trapped heat before getting to the heatpipes and then taken away by the fins.
  14. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    They really need to stop using pipes, it would make much more sense to use one wide "pipe" rather then several smaller ones.

    Its easily done as well just seems no on in the industry has a head on their shoulders, just copying other companies all the time.


    ( I understand that sometimes my descriptions are shoddy, so just imagine a 16mm heatpipe squashed flat whilst still remaining 3 mm thick so phase can still occur)
  15. Completely Bonkers New Member

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    Nice idea px12, but the problem is manufacting such items is much harder, and therefore much more expensive, PLUS, bending such a shape is likely to cause a collapse fold. So for practical reasons, the round pipes are here to stay.

    [​IMG]

    Making air flow "kink round a corner" is only causing resistance. And is there any airflow at the centre of the fan? Not much. Fins should be SHORTEST there. Not a clever design IMO except for (possibly) getting a bigger cooler and bigger fan into a standard height case.

    Oh, and how many degrees is that? Like the information is important? No it isnt.
  16. theonedub

    theonedub habe fidem

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    Another issue that may affect its performance is that the largest part of the heatsink looks to be behind the dead zone of the fan, no?
    Crunching for Team TPU
  17. [I.R.A]_FBi

    [I.R.A]_FBi New Member

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    without some curvature on the fins closest to the fan = fail ...
  18. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    Actually it would cost less :laugh: ( less parts, only 1 pipe needs to be made per cooler)

    Also bending it would be no problem, they manage to bend heat pipes already after all.
  19. Icejon New Member

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    It would cost more. You really need special expensive tooling on a factory level to handle vapor chamber, flat heatpipes or heat column technology above 10mm width.

    The reasons manufacturers use 4mm, 6mm, and 8mm heatpipes is that a majority of them buy the heat columns from other manufacturers. These are standard sizes and fit in standard manufacturing processes and the machines they use to shape and place the heatpipes.

    Failure rates in working with 10mm and above size heatpipes are higher, the unit costs are higher and nobody has the tools to work with them.

    These companies like Nexus, Gelid, Xigmatek, and Noctua don't own the factories that produce their coolers. They just spec the fans and have another company stack the fins and bend the heatpipes. They use ODMs who save costs by using readily available technology with different heatsink stacks etc.

    There are only a few companies with their own factories that can produce the fans and the coolers in large enough scale to be cost effective for most people. For example Cooler Master who have these kind of factories and technology, I am sure they would build your dream cooler with 16mm heatpipe.

    All you have to do is invest in the tooling, presses and assembly line. It's a good deal if you have $2 million dollars or so. Since we aren't talking about parts for the space shuttle, so this kind of CPU cooler will never be built. That is unless you have 2 million to invest.:D
  20. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    They just need to adjust the manufacturing technique, send a liquid or a gas through the pipe at high pressure in order to reduce the chance of crumpling.

    Won't cost the OEMS all that much.

    I've managed to bend and flatten copper pipe of that diameter by hand by the by.

    Just took time, a machine could do it much faster.

    Hells they could even just sandwich two separate bars of copper together and then then solder down both sides . then its only a case of sealing the ends after adding the gas.



    I've put a lot of thought into it : ]


    Aswell as that I've seen one cooling company specialise in larger heatpipes, I'm sure they could easily adapt the process.

    I imagine they'd be the first to do it as well.

    They only make coolers for servers mind you.
  21. Phxprovost

    Phxprovost Xtreme Refugee

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    i see a whole lot of fail in this design
  22. sneekypeet

    sneekypeet Unpaid Babysitter Staff Member

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    I like it, well sort of...

    The fins are fine, the fan postition is fine, and the shroud should help performance (and the flames mean...u know it, its gotta be faster...lol)

    It does seems to have some issues though, at least I think it might.
    Staggering the fins is nice, but how much surface area is lost?
    Is the fan incredibly loud to make up for this loss, or is the cooler an undeachiever?
    Then the offset worries me.... the direction of airflow, normally pointing at the rear exhaust, leaves the offset of the pipes right into competition with room from the motherboard caps(potentially).
  23. Icejon New Member

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    No Cooler Master makes all the CPU coolers they sell. That's why there are no "copies" of coolers for example like:
    - V8, V10
    - Hyper N520, Hyper N 620
    - Hyper 212 Plus

    When you see a company like Xigmatek selling the 1283, and another company selling the exact same thing like an OCZ Vendetta 2, either they both buy it from the same company or one of the companies selling it makes it. The thing about copies is that the factory selling to Xigmatek can also sell the model to others. It isn't only Cooler Master that has the tools, if you want you could pitch your cooler to Zalman.

    Back on topic, there are some typos on the press release quote here on TP. Also the Nexus cooler seems more designed by marketing people than engineers. Most of the airflow is not going to change direction and blow through the stacked heatpipes. The air is just going to follow the paths of least resistance and go around or down.
  24. pantherx12

    pantherx12 New Member

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    What did that have to do with anything! :laugh: I said nothing about that.



    I know for example the 1283 was actually originally designed by the company Zaward.
  25. Icejon New Member

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    I misunderstood the "They only make coolers for servers mind you." part. Oh well, I am trying to find you some pictures of a new heat column cooler. I've lost them but I think you would like it.

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