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OCZ to Unveil Z-Drive R4 Series PCI-Express SSDs Today

Discussion in 'News' started by btarunr, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. btarunr

    btarunr Editor & Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Once a PC enthusiast-centric company, OCZ is taking the solid state drive business seriously, across all market segments, consumer-thru-enterprise. The company now has SSDs in nearly all form-factors, making use of nearly all industry standard interfaces, it even has its own high-bandwidth interface modelled. Some of its highest performance SSDs are in the PCI-Express addon card form-factor, that include SSDs with transfer rates well within the gigabyte per second range.

    OCZ CEO Ryan Petersen will be holding a conference call with the press later today, in which he will be talking about the company's enterprise SSD business, and unveil a new PCI-Express SSD, called Z-Drive R4. Z-Drive is OCZ's enterprise PCI-E SSD targeted at systems in which throughput is everything. The Z-Drive R4 was spotted at this year's Computex event, it is essentially a PCI-Express 2.0 x8 addon card that has an 8-port SATA 6 Gb/s controller, driving eight, yes, eight SSD subunits in RAID 0. Each subunit consists of a SandForce SF-2281 controller with its own NAND flash memory. As with all compound SSDs, the RAID 0 volume is completely abstract to the host machine.

    The Z-Drive R4 offers transfer rates of up to 2,900 MB/s read; 2,700 MB/s write; and 350,000 IOPS 4K random write performance. It will be available in a number of NAND flash architecture options, including SLC, MLC, and eMLC. Further, it will be sold in two major variants, the C-series and R-series. The C-series will be available in capacities ranging from 480 GB to 3.84 TB; while the R-series will be available in capacities of 800 GB to 3.20 TB. The C-series uses less NAND flash overprovisioning yielding more capacity, and unlike the R-series, has lower protection from sudden power loss.
  2. Hayder_Master

    Hayder_Master

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    Lol here is crazy numbers and crazy prices.
  3. HTC

    HTC

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    Fixed that for you!
  4. Breathless New Member

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    Maybe... but I like that OCZ is so aggressive about this SSD business. In the long run, it means lower prices for us all.
  5. wrathchild_67

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    I'll take one 3.84TB SLC version for $50000 please.
  6. n-ster

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    The 480 GB version looks interesting! I wish the MLC version would be affordable... 999.99$ or less would be pretty nice
  7. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    Can't wait to see more about these things.
  8. WarraWarra New Member

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    As long as you can replace the ocz ssd's with something that is stable and works then this should be a decent piece of hardware.

    350,000 IOPS 4K that's a bit low maybe it is a typo or something.
    Kingstons HyperX ssd runs at Max 4KB random read/write of 95,000 / 70,000 IOPS and this is for 1 ssd. This is not even the normal avg, think 120k is normal avg. for ssd's at this time.

    8x 70k = 560k ??
    6x 70k = 420k ??
  9. [H]@RD5TUFF

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    Your missing the point, because it's controller is built in it can support TRIM, where as internal SSD's on a controller card can't. This can, and likely will, which is good, as TRIM is necessary for SSD's. Your also assuming that the scaling would be perfect, which it wouldn't because the controller couldn't handle the speed.
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2011
  10. 1c3d0g

    1c3d0g

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    Those numbers are INSANE! :eek:

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