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Old laptop internet question

Discussion in 'General Hardware' started by Krazy Owl, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. Krazy Owl

    Krazy Owl New Member

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    Hi.

    I have a Compaq Evo N610C with 100Mbits/s lan and a PCMCIA wireless lan card at 54Mbits/s.

    Both connected at same time and they both work I think. Does it mean my download is now 154Mbits/s ???
  2. Frick

    Frick Fishfaced Nincompoop

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  3. CrackerJack

    CrackerJack

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    Just cause your wireless card is 54Mbit, doesn't mean your gonna get it. Same as the 100Mbit card. Still limit to your ISP speeds. Either way your not gonna fully utilize those devices. Even with LAN transfers!
  4. scoutingwraith

    scoutingwraith

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    Also you just cant combine connections like that. Not sure how windows will handle it but it will set the faster one by default i think. (Personally i have never tried it)
  5. 95Viper

    95Viper

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    That is a loaded question... they are separate connections. It is possible, in some cases, to make them work as one or be redundant.

    However, the 100Mb/s you are are looking at is, probably, your NIC to router negotiated speed... not, necessarily, what your isp is giving you or the plan you have.
    The wireless lan card's 54Mb/s is, probably, your connection speed to the isp provider's site.
    Not, necessarily, the speed you are downloading from the field side of your router/wlan card.

    You don't state your isp's plans speeds, so it hard to say on that side, but your router/wlan to the NIC/PCMCIA bus... you have those negotiated speeds.

    The bandwidth is, possibly, there (depends on your plans from the isp you have)... just not in one huge pipe or combined in one connection.
    There are ways to utilize the two connections... there is teaming, bridging, or bonding.
    But, there is nothing better than a more bandwidth. The software below and all the little tricks will either ending up costing more or being more trouble than they are worth.

    I remembered hearing of Connectify a while back and found this info... ain't free and I personally haven't tried it.

    Connectify Dispatch Merges Your Available Internet Connections into One Fat, Super-Fast Pipe

    Connectify Dispatch is easy-to-use Windows software that lets you combine multiple Wi-Fi, 3G or 4G, and Ethernet connections into one super-fast connection. Try Dispatch along with our software router, Connectify Hotspot PRO, absolutely risk-free!

    To me, it seems to use some form of hybrid load balancing and download prioritizing.

    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  6. Guitarrassdeamor

    Guitarrassdeamor

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    Not sure if serious...but no, not even close.
  7. ueutyi New Member

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    No.
    That speed shown is only a possible speed, like its maximum, it does not mean ur connected to a network that is 100Mbit/S
  8. Jetster

    Jetster

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  9. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    Another Krazy Owl question that could have been answered by making a quick Google search.

    Most people try researching a question before asking it. :wtf:

    This can be done, but usually when you're considering this you have a router (not a home router in most cases,) that connections different networks together (on the internet,) and will use routing tables to determine how to get somewhere. It's not usually used to increase bandwidth but rather to satisfy more connections with different (or similar,) endpoints.

    Even if you were to do that, routing does it's magic based on the destination of the packet. So if the destination is always the same it is very likely it will get routed to the same path. It's how packets get routed but you can't split them up (easily,) like you suggest.

    Here is an example off my gateway of the routing table it has. As you can tell (if you can read it,) You can only route packets by the time they get to the router, not before.
    [​IMG]

    Pardon the webmin output. I figured it would be easier to read than console output.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  10. Geofrancis

    Geofrancis

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    I dont think they will understand that lol
  11. Aquinus

    Aquinus Resident Wat-man

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    Well, that alone is a reason to not even try. :p

    Understanding routing tables is essential to do this.

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